Blue Wild Angel Is A Fitting Memorial To Hendrix’s Legacy

Courtesy:  Experience Hendrix, LLC/Legacy Recordings

Courtesy: Experience Hendrix, LLC/Legacy Recordings

Sony Legacy and Experience Hendrix, LLC released their latest archived live Jimi Hendrix performance this week.  Jimi Hendrix Live at the Isle of Wight: Blue Wild Angel was released on DVD and Blu-ray earlier this week.  The latest archived concert to be released by Sony Legacy and Experience Hendrix, LLC, this archived concert is one more wonderful addition to the ongoing series of archived concerts that the companies have released in recent years.  The first reason for that is the concert’s set list.  Included in this concert are some familiar pieces.  There are also some not so familiar pieces included in the show’s set list, too.  Those songs are a great addition to the concert in whole.  Just as worth noting in this new concert recording is the show’s collective audio and video mix. The recording’s bonus material—primarily the interview with director Murray Lerner and the bonus live footage of ‘Hey Joe’—completes the presentation, making Jimi Hendrix Live at the Isle of Wight: Blue Wild Angel a definite candidate for a spot on this critic’s list of the year’s best new live recordings.

Jimi Hendrix Live at the Isle of Wight: Blue Wild Angel is one of the most important live recordings that any Jimi Hendrix fan and music historian alike should add to their own collection. The reason for that is that while it wasn’t his last concert, it was his final full official performance before his untimely passing in late 1970. One of the key reasons that viewers will enjoy this concert recording so much is that it includes more than the typical Hendrix hits. He pays homage to The Beatles with a performance of the title track from the band’s 1967 alum Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band early on. Before the concert begins, there is a near fifteen-minute documentary of sorts that sets the stage so to speak, for the concert. During the course of the documentary, Hendrix notes in some of the footage that he was in fact a fan of The Beatles. Taking this into account, that comment makes Hendrix’s performance of the Beatles’ hit all the more special. Audiences will agree that Hendrix does the song justice even with his rendition. Just as intriguing is the juxtaposition of Jimi, Mitch [Mitchell] (drums) and Billy [Cox] (bass) performing ‘God Save The Queen.’ It is intriguing in that also included in the pre-concert mini-documentary” is a clip of Jimi discussing his performance of the National Anthem at Woodstock and the reaction to said performance. He also discusses his military service with Cavett during said clip. It makes the group’s performance of ‘God Save The Queen’ almost a response of sorts to those that came out against him for his rendition of the National Anthem even after the fact. Add in performances of ‘Dolly Dagger,’ ‘Freedom,’ ‘Spanish Castle Music,’ and others that are less commonly seen in previous Hendrix live recordings alongside Hendrix’s standards, and audiences get a set list that by itself, makes plenty of reason to check out this new live recording.

The set list that Jimi and his band mates had assembled for what would be their last full official concert is in itself reason enough for audiences and music historians to want to purchase this recording. The collective audio and video mix of this recording makes it even more of a success. Almost forty-five years (that’s almost three quarters of a century) later, the footage looks and sounds just as good as it did in its original recording. That is a testament to those charged with bringing the concert back to life for audiences of all ages. The footage looks and sounds especially good in its transfer to Blu-ray. The grainy quality of the original recording is still there. So that vintage feel was not lost in the transfer. It just looks more well defined for lack of better wording. And the audio is just as impressive. It sounds impressive on an HDTV. But those with home theater systems will truly appreciate the quality of the audio in the original concert audio’s re-mastering and transfer to Blu-ray. Making the experience even more special is the inclusion of extra camera angles on specific songs as bonus material. It adds even more to the overall experience, especially being that they largely come from the stage.

Speaking of bonus material, the bonus performance of Jimi and company performing ‘Hey Joe’ puts the final piece in place for this recording. The performance had not been included in the original concert recording. So having it included this time gives audiences the full experience in terms of the show’s set list. The bonus interview with director Murray Lerner rounds out the presentation. His insight and behind-the-scenes tidbits regarding the pre-show preps and reaction by the fans shows a troubled show that seemingly came close to not happening. And even when it did happen, it wasn’t without its share of problems. But because it did happen, audiences today get what is a fitting final end to a career that would ultimately be cut far too short.

Jimi Hendrix Live at the Isle of Wight: Blue Wild Angel is available now on DVD and Blu-ray in stores and online. It can be ordered directly from the official Jimi Hendrix website, http://www.jimihendrix.com/us/home. More information on this and other Hendrix releases, as well as the upcoming 2014 Experience Hendrix Tour and more Jimi Hendrix news, is available via the official Jimi Hendrix website and Facebook page, http://www.facebook.com/JimiHendrix. To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at http://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Experience Hendrix, Legacy Announce New Hendrix Live Recording

Courtesy:  Experience Hendrix, LLC/Legacy Recordings

Courtesy: Experience Hendrix, LLC/Legacy Recordings

Officials with Experience Hendrix, LLC and Legacy Recordings announced Tuesday that the companies will release one of the last live performances of Jimi Hendrix’s career next month.

Blue Wild Angel: Jimi Hendrix Live at the Isle of Wight will be released on Tuesday, June 17th on DVD and Blu-ray. The recording captures what would be his last full performance before his death eighteen days later on September 18th, 1970. His last live performance before his death was an impromptu set at Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club in Soho less than a month later. The concert presented on Blue Wild Angel: Jimi Hendrix Live at the Isle of Wight documents Hendrix’s headlining performance at the hugely revered festival on August 31st 1970. Hendrix performed to an audience of 600,000 at the festival. It was the largest audience before which he had ever performed. It was also the first time that his new band, rounded out by bassist Billy Cox and drummer Mitch Mitchell, had played together in the UK.

The concert’s presentation on both DVD and Blu-ray will contain the same features including new footage of ‘Hey Joe’ that was not part of the concert recording’s original release. There is also a bonus interview with director Murray Lerner, reproductions of the original Isle of Wight Festival tickets, festival posters and even a copy of Hendrix’s own hand-written directions to the festival. The recording features both a stereo sound mix and ad 5.1 audio surround sound track mixed by Eddie Kramer. Eddie Kramer was Jimi Hendrix’s original recording engineer. The complete track listing for Blue Wild Angel: Jimi Hendrix Live at the Isle of Wight is noted below.

TRACKLIST

  1.      Blue Wild Angel: Jimi Hendrix Live At The Isle Of Wight (Main Film) (Live At The Isle Of Wight)
  2.      Introduction (Live At The Isle Of Wight)
  3.      God Save The Queen (Live At The Isle Of Wight)
  4.      Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (Live At The Isle Of Wight)
  5.      Spanish Castle Magic (Live At The Isle Of Wight)
  6.      All Along The Watchtower (Live At The Isle Of Wight)
  7.      Machine Gun (Live At The Isle Of Wight)
  8.      Lover Man (Live At The Isle Of Wight)
  9.      Freedom (Live At The Isle Of Wight)
  10.  Red House (Live At The Isle Of Wight)
  11.  Dolly Dagger (Live At The Isle Of Wight)
  12.  Foxey Lady (Live At The Isle Of Wight)
  13.  Message To Love (Live At The Isle Of Wight)
  14.  Ezy Ryder (Live At The Isle Of Wight)
  15.  Purple Haze (Live At The Isle Of Wight)
  16.  Voodoo Child (Slight Return) (Live At The Isle Of Wight)
  17.  In From The Storm (Live At The Isle Of Wight)
  18.  Credits (Live At The Isle Of Wight)

Blue Wild Angel: Jimi Hendrix Live at the Isle of Wight will be available Tuesday, June 17th. It can be pre-ordered online now via Amazon at http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00JGD0TGC/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B00JGD0TGC&linkCode=as2&tag=legacy_recordings-20&linkId=ZIHQ4HIRI22HXDGE. More information on this and other Jimi Hendrix recordings is available online at http://www.facebook.com/JimiHendrix and http://www.jimihendrix.com. To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at http://philspicks.wordpress.com.

McDermott Discusses Upcoming Hendrix LP

Bob Merlis/M.f.h./Experience Hendrix, LLC/Legacy Recordings

Bob Merlis/M.f.h./Experience Hendrix, LLC/Legacy Recordings

Legacy Recordings will release the brand new Jimi Hendrix rarities album, People, Hell and Angels on Tuesday, March 5th.  The anticipation is building over this upcoming compilation of previously unreleased songs.  Now thanks to musicradar.com writer Joe Bosso, audiences are able to get a glimpse into each song on the new LP.  Bosso—who previously served as editor-in-chief of Guitar World magazine and ex VP of A&R at Island Records–sat down with the album’s co-producer John McDermott and let him discuss the story behind each track in depth.  The following is what McDermott had to say about each song.  It comes courtesy of Mr. Bosso.

On 5 March, Experience Hendrix LLC and Legacy Recordings releases People, Hell And Angels, a new collection of previously unreleased Jimi Hendrix recordings culled from sessions between early 1968 and late ’69, which saw the guitarist assuming the producer role and experimenting with different groups of musicians outside of the original Jimi Hendrix Experience trio.

“It’s a really exciting and interesting album,” says John McDermott, who co-produced the set with Eddie Kramer and Janie Hendrix. “The idea on Valleys Of Neptune was to show the end of the original Jimi Hendrix Experience, and with People, Hell And Angels, we moved the timeline up some. We looked at the remaining material, and the idea was to fill in the portrait as best we could.”

The recordings on People, Hell And Angels feature the first-ever studio session by the Band Of Gypsys, along with the group that Hendrix assembled for Woodstock, and also it showcases collaborations with old friends and new friends. “He was widening the net,” says McDermott. “Once the Experience were no longer going to be an effective recording unit, he got Billy Cox and Buddy Miles, as well as additional percussion and Larry Lee on additional guitar. And there’s a track where his friend Stephen Stills bass. There’s experimentation, but it’s not in a loose, unformed way; Jimi was working with really compelling song structures, and he was playing great, too.”

During this period, Hendrix worked at various facilities – New York’s Record Plant, Hit Factory and Sound Center, along with the Fame Studios in Muscle Shoals, Alabama – and with the exception of the track Somewhere, everything was recorded 16-track onto two-inch tape. “They were mainly Scotch tapes, and they were great shape,” says McDermott. “Jimi was fortunate in that he was working at a time before tape got thinner. We didn’t have to do any baking to the recordings. Everything held up beautifully.”

Hendrix’s last official album with the Experience was 1968’s Electric Ladyland, and the tracks on People, Hell And Angels offer fascinating insights as to the musical direction he was entertaining on his planned double album First Rays Of The New Rising Sun. “Jimi was working with friends who shared a common language with him,” says McDermott. “To be able to say to people who knew Elmore James, ‘I want to get an entirely different beat to this. I want to take this somewhere new. Here’s where we’re going’ – that was exciting for him. Everybody fell right in and tore into the music.

“What’s fascinating about Jimi is that one week of his felt like a year for other artists. There was so much creativity and so many possibilities. He was really looking to challenge himself. When he had an idea, he chased it fearlessly.”

Earth Blues

 

     “This harks back to that first May 1969 session. It was one of the songs that Jimi showcased to Buddy and Billy. While they didn’t get it then, they certainly had an interesting handle on it. When things geared up in December of that year for 

      the Band Of Gypsys shows, this is one of the tracks that was not only in the set, but Jimi recorded it in the studio, as well.

 

“What’s really interesting about this one is that, unlike the version now on First Rays Of The New Rising Sun and previously on Rainbow Bridge, it shows off the stripped-down funk, without the Ronettes and a lot of the extra guitar things that were overdubbed by Jimi later. It’s a separate take entirely, and he’s got the drum break in it, which is really cool. It’s a different approach.

“There was a shared understanding between Billy and Buddy, and that made it really easy for Jimi to work with them. As great as Noel became as a bassist, I just think that the camaraderie that Jimi and Billy had was special. They worked on material before they got into the studio in ways that Jimi and Noel never did. They got together in hotel rooms or in Jimi’s apartment – they enjoyed playing together. By ’68, ’69, Jimi’s relationship with Noel was more professional.”

Somewhere

“It’s really Jimi and Buddy Miles, and then Stephen Stills joins them on bass, and it starts to come together. It’s a great track with something of a strange history: It was part of the Crash Landing album, but a different take of the song was used on that. To us, this is the version that has all the right pieces. It’s got the original instrumentation and none of the posthumous overdubbing.

“It’s surprising to me that Somewhere was never considered for Electric Ladyland. I don’t know whether that was because Jimi recorded it without Chas Chandler being there to supervise it – that could have been an issue. Like My Friend, it’s a really interesting look at Jimi when he was just starting to step outside the original three-man band.

“Stephen Stills was good friends with Jimi, and he was friends with Buddy, as well, so it was a great mix of personalities. Stephen acquitted himself well on the bass. I think this track was really about Jimi taking advantage of the skills his friends had and tapping into that. Today, it’s nothing to invite your friends to the studio and have them play on a track – people do it all the time, guest starring on cuts and all that. Back then, it didn’t happen so much. The Beatles, The Stones – with rare exceptions, they always kept the core.”

 

Hear My Train A Comin’

 

“One of the highlights of the record. It’s Jimi sharing a common language with Billy and Buddy. All three of them did the chitlin’ circuit together. Both this song and Bleeding Heart were right in everybody’s wheelhouse.

“Jimi’s first love was the blues, but unlike his contemporaries – Clapton or Beck or some others – who were covering blues songs that they had heard on records, he was writing new, original blues and taking it to the next level. That’s what this is – a phenomenal take on a song that he had really tried to get right with the Experience, but hadn’t been able to do it to his liking.

“Billy and Buddy understood how to set the tempo. If you listen to this recording, they play it the same way as they did on the Live At The Fillmore East album. They knew intuitively that the song should have a great, menacing groove; it shouldn’t be old-school, old-tempo, four-bar stuff. They wanted it to have a totally different feel, and that’s what makes it exciting.”

 

Bleeding Heart

“The Elmore James song. Jimi loved Elmore, of course, and he tried this one many different ways: as a 12-bar, slow, extended version with the Experience; as a version that’s on Valleys Of Neptune with Billy Cox and the Cherry People, which is really cool – a totally different vibe. He worked with it a lot.

“What’s so cool about this track is that, prior to cutting it again, he told Buddy and Billy, ‘I want to drive a whole different beat.’ Again, it’s Jimi reinterpreting the blues. Yes, there’s homage there, but he’s putting his imprint on it. He had a way about him in that, when he did a cover, be it All Along The Watchtower, Sgt. Pepper or Like A Rolling Stone, it became a Jimi Hendrix tune. This is a fresh take.” 

Let Me Move You

 

“Jimi was reaching back to old friends, including Lonnie Youngblood, and he had this idea to take what they used to do, when Jimi was a sideman for Lonnie, and bring it into the future. He was able to be free not only with his guitar part but with the tone and the attack, as well. None of that stuff had to be muted like it was going to be a little R&B recording; instead, it was a Jimi Hendrix recording.

“Given that, I think everybody stepped up. It’s a very exciting, energetic cut. Jimi put everything he had into it. If you compare it to some of the things he had done with Lonnie three years earlier, it’s like night and day.

“Guitar players should take note of him comping the changes. He really understood the value of rhythm guitar; that you really have to connect to an arrangement and bring something to it, not just for a 16-bar solo but throughout the song. He’s all over it.

“It’s really cool to hear Jimi play off Lonnie’s saxophone, and what’s especially interesting is to hear how he can add but not trample.”

Izabella

 

“What I love about this version of Izabella is that it showcases the promise of the Woodstock band. I think what Jimi saw in that, and having somebody like Larry Lee, whom he had played with on the chitlin’ circuit, was adding that rhythm guitar and connecting with it. The band had played this song two weeks earlier at Woodstock, and it came off very well. Jimi wanted to cut it in the studio while it was still fresh.

“The solo is just fantastic – absolutely scorching. Eddie Kramer and I heard it in ’95 when we were going through the tape library, and we said, ‘You know what? When the time comes, there will be a place for that.’ It’s amazing.”

Easy Blues

“Easy Blues is a favorite. There was an edited version that came out as part of Nine To The Universe, and we’ve had a lot of requests for the extended track. It really fits here because it’s from the same sessions, and it’s the same instrumentation, the same players. Contextually, we felt that this was the place to showcase the longer extract.

“It’s right in Mitch’s pocket – he plays very, very well on this. The additional percussion, the ability for everybody to add to what Jimi was doing instead of him having to carry the weight all the time – there’s a lot here, and you can hear why Jimi felt that this band had a lot of potential. It’s a shame that it wasn’t able to grow into something, but cuts like this sound great.”

Crash Landing

 

“Obviously, it was a part of the Crash Landing album. We just felt that anything that had been tinkered with should be heard in its original form. This is what Jimi was actually doing with the players, and it’s really good. There was never any need for any of that overdubbing that had gone on in ’75.

“Anybody who hears this will recognize it as a precursor of Freedom, but it still stands on its own. Jimi’s playing is great, the time signatures are unique, and Billy Cox, in one of his first sessions, is terrific. You can kind of get a sense for some of the things Billy would be doing going forward. He cemented the bottom in a way that Noel didn’t.

“There is a keyboard player on the track – somebody’s on B3 – but we don’t know who it was. They cut it all live. The session was tough for Jimi because he was struggling to get the guy to play what he wanted. A more sympathetic player like Steve Winwood might have been able to take it our further, but this is what Jimi had on this particular day.”

Inside Out

 

“A cool track. It starts to show the concept of Jimi no longer having to work with the three-man band. Actually, it’s him looking at a really unusual way of recording, where he and Mitch would work without a bass player. Jimi would overdub the bass.

“When you listen to a track as complex as this, that’s almost hard to believe. Mitch wasn’t a straight-ahead kind of drummer like Buddy Miles. While he played in time, he would certainly add a lot of amazing accents and techniques. Yet Jimi was able to pull everything off, and as a bass player he was fabulous.

“He and Eddie Kramer worked on that great Leslie guitar sound. Ezy Rider was such an important riff in his head – he doesn’t yet have it quite together, but here he’s blending it with kind of what he did with Tax Free, and that’s what makes it so interesting.”

Hey Gypsy Boy

 

“The precursor of Hey Baby from the Rising Sun album. Again, it’s one of Jimi’s first recordings with Buddy Miles. It shows the direction moving out of the Experience, and it would be a key part of Jimi’s set throughout 1970 and, of course, as the great version that’s on First Rays.”

Mojo Man

 

“A very cool track. It was cut at Fame Studios in Muscle Shoals, which was the hottest R&B studio at the time, but Jimi, just by making his additions, turned it into something that those guys never could have put together. His whole approach elevates it beyond what was then contemporary R&B.

“The groove of the Fame track – James Booker on piano – is fantastic. There was some amazing talent in the room. But what Jimi brought to it really speaks to what he could do, not only as a guitar player but as a producer, as well.”

Villanova Junction Blues

 

“The Woodstock version with Band Of Gypsys is so ingrained in people’s minds, but here is Jimi at the very front of it, kind of saying, ‘OK, I’ve got something really great, but I have to develop it.’

“We thought it was a sweet way to bring the record to a close. Like a lot of great songs in the library, it’s one that held a lot of promise, but of course, he wasn’t able to finish it.”

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it or its companion page, http://www.facebook.com/pages/Reel-Reviews/381028148587141.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at http://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Experience Hendrix Announces New Slate of Releases for 2013

Bob Merlis/M.f.h./Experience Hendrix, LLC/Legacy Recordings

Bob Merlis/M.f.h./Experience Hendrix, LLC/Legacy Recordings

The world celebrated the seventieth anniversary of the birth of the iconic musician Jimmy Hendrix this past November.  While the anniversary has passed, Experience Hendrix, LLC continues to celebrate his legacy with more new releases this winter.  The company is set to release a new compilation of previously unreleased material in March titled, People, Hell and Angels.  In anticipation of the upcoming release, the single, ‘Somewhere’ is now available online at http://www.rollingstone.com.  The song is just one of the twelve tracks that comprise the new release.  It will also be available in a variety of formats beginning February 5th.  It will be available as a CD single available only at Wal-Mart.  It will also be available as a digital single and a special double-sided vinyl single available only at independent record stores nationwide.  The vinyl single will come with a bonus B-side that is a previously unreleased recording of ‘Power of Soul’ recorded by Band of Gypsys.  The CD single will come with a bonus live recording of ‘Foxey Lady’ recorded live at the Fillmore East in January 1970.  Both the vinyl and CD singles will be limited editions.

The upcoming album and limited edition singles are just part of the ongoing celebration of Hendrix’s birth and life.  Now, Experience Hendrix, LLC has made a new announcement about even more releases.  Along with the upcoming release of People, Hell and Angels, Experience Hendrix, LLC will also release a pair of Hendrix’s classic albums on 12” mono vinyl’s for true Hendrix aficionados.   The companion releases will be re-issues of his classic albums, Are You Experienced and Axis: Bold as Love.  Both albums will be struck on 200-gram audiophile vinyl.  Each one will be individually numbered and will include original artwork and sequencing.

The track listing for each vinyl is as follows:

Are You Experienced (U.S. Sequence and Artwork)

Side 1                                                    Side 2

1.  Purple Haze                                  1.  The Wind Cries Mary

2.  Manic Depression                      2.  Fire

3.  Hey Joe                                          3.  3rd Stone From The Sun

4.  Love or Confusion                      4.  Foxey Lady

5.  May This Be Love                       5.  Are You Experienced

6.  I Don’t Live Today

Are You Experienced (U.K. Sequence and Artwork)

Side 1                                                    Side 2

1.  Foxey Lady                                    1.  May This Be Love

2.  Manic Depression                      2.  Third Stone From the Sun

3.  Red House                                    3.  Remember

4.  Can You See Me                         4.  Are You experienced

5.  Love or Confusion

6.  I Don’t Live Today

 

Axis: Bold as Love

Side 1                                                    Side 2

1.  EXP                                                   1.  You Got Me Floating

2.  Up From the Skies                     2.  Castles Made of Sand

3.  Spanish Castle Magic                                3.  She’s So Fine

4.  Wait Until Tomorrow                4.  One Rainy Wish

5.  Little Wing                                     5.  Little Miss Lover

6.  If 6 Was 9                                       6.  Bold as Love

 

For all of the latest news on the latest Hendrix releases and more, fans can go online to http://www.jimihendrix.com.

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it or its companion page, http://www.facebook.com/pages/Reel-Reviews/381028148587141.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at http://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Experience Hendrix, Legacy Recordings Offer Track-By-Track Rundown Of New Hendrix LP

Bob Merlis/M.f.h./Experience Hendrix, LLC/Legacy Recordings

The music world has spent 2012 celebrating the seventieth anniversary of Jimi Hendrix’s birthday.  And now rather than let the celebration end, Experience Hendrix, LLC and Legacy Recordings have decided to extend the celebration of the late musician’s birthday anniversary with a new release in the New Year.

Experience Hendrix, LLC and Legacy Recordings have teamed up for the release of a brand new compilation of previously unreleased Hendrix recordings title, People, Hell and Angels. The album, which shows Hendrix’s post- Jimi Hendrix Experience works, will be released March 5, 2013.  In anticipation of the upcoming release, Jimi’s sister and Experience Hendrix, LLC President/CEO commented on the new album.  “We’re thrilled to be able to release People, Hell and Angels during the celebration of the 70th anniversary of my brother’s birth.  The brilliance of the album serves to underscore what we’ve known all along: that there has never been and never will be a musical force equal to his and that we cherish and take inspiration of what he left us both now and for many generations to come…simply eternity.”

Legacy Recordings president Adam Block also shared his thoughts on the upcoming release.  “People, Hell and Angels provides us with further insight into the genius of Jimi Hendrix”, he said.  “Working with new rhythm sections and instrumentation, Jimi Hendrix was opening up the horizons of his music, creating new sounds filled with endless possibilities.”

While People, Hell and Angels won’t hit stores for at least another four months, Experience Hendrix and Legacy Recordings are offering a track-by-track rundown of the album for fans.  Each song on the album is given explanation in this new rundown.  And they are explained right here as follows:

People, Hell & Angels – Track by Track

 

Earth Blues:

Totally unlike the version first issued as part of Rainbow Bridge in 1971, this December 19, 1969 master take features just Hendrix, Billy Cox and Buddy Miles–stripped down funk at its very origin.  

 

Somewhere:

This newly discovered gem was recorded in March 1968 and features Buddy Miles on drums and Stephen Stills on bass.    Entirely different from any previous version fans have ever heard.

 

Hear My Train A Comin':

This superb recording was drawn from Jimi’s first ever recording session with Billy Cox and Buddy Miles–the powerhouse rhythm section with whom he would later record the groundbreaking album Band Of Gypsys

 

Jimi shared a deep love for the blues with Billy Cox and Buddy Miles.  Both musicians understood Jimi’s desire to create what he described as a ‘new type of blues’.   Jimi’s menacing lead guitar is the centerpiece of this dramatic addition to his remarkable legacy.

 

Bleeding Heart:

This Elmore James masterwork had long been a favorite of Jimi’s.   He had performed the song earlier that year with the Experience in concert at the Royal Albert Hall and had attempted to capture the song in New York studio sessions during the weeks that followed.

 

Recorded at the same May 1969 session as “Hear My Train A Coming,” the track conveys Jimi’s firm understanding of the arrangement and tempo he desired. Before they began, Jimi instructed Cox and Miles that he wanted to establish a totally different beat than the standard arrangement.  He then kicked off this amazing rendition that was nothing like any other he had ever attempted. 

 

Let Me Move You:

In March 1969, Jimi reached back to another old friend, saxophonist Lonnie Youngblood.   Before he was discovered by Chas Chandler in the summer of 1966, Jimi had contributed guitar as a nondescript studio sideman for Youngblood and such infectious rhythm and blues styled singles such as “Soul Food”.

 

This March 1969 session features Hendrix and Youngblood trading licks throughout this never before heard, high velocity rock and soul classic.

 

Izabella:

In the aftermath of the Woodstock festival, Jimi gathered his new ensemble, Gypsy Sun & Rainbows, at the Hit Factory in August 1969 with engineer Eddie Kramer.  “Izabella” had been one of the new songs the guitarist introduced at the Woodstock festival and Jimi was eager to perfect a studio version.    This new version is markedly different from the Band Of Gypsys 45 rpm single master issued by Reprise Records in 1970 and features Larry Lee, Jimi’s old friend from the famed rhythm & blues ‘chitin’ circuit’, on rhythm guitar.

 

Easy Blues:

An edited extract of this gorgeous, free flowing instrumental was briefly issued as part of the long-out-of-print 1981 album Nine To The Universe.  Now nearly twice as long, the track offers fans the opportunity to enjoy the dramatic interplay between Jimi, second guitarist Larry Lee, Billy Cox and drummer Mitch Mitchell.

 

Crash Landing:

Perhaps known as the title song for the controversial 1975 album that featured Hendrix master recordings posthumously overdubbed by session musicians, this April 1969 original recording has never been heard before.   Jimi is joined here by Billy Cox and drummer Rocky Isaac of the Cherry People to record this thinly veiled warning to his girlfriend Devon Wilson.

 

Inside Out:

Jimi was fascinated by the rhythm pattern that would ultimately take form as “Ezy Ryder”.  Joined here by Mitch Mitchell, Jimi recorded all of the bass and guitar parts for this fascinating song–including a dramatic lead guitar part amplified through a Leslie organ speaker.

 

Hey Gypsy Boy:

The roots of Jimi’s majestic “Hey Baby (New Rising Sun)” trace themselves to this March 1969 recording.  Unlike the posthumously overdubbed version briefly issued as part of Midnight Lightning in 1975, this is original recording that features Jimi joined by Buddy Miles.

 

Mojo Man:

Jimi would lend a hand to Albert & Arthur Allen, the vocalists known as the Ghetto Fighters, whom he had befriended in Harlem long before he achieved fame with the Experience.  When the two recorded this inspired, previously unreleased master at the legendary Fame Studios in Muscle Shoals, Alabama they took it back to Hendrix at Electric Lady Studios.  Jimi knew just what to do to elevate the recording beyond contemporary R & B to the new hybrid of rock, rhythm and blues he was celebrated for.

 

Villanova Junction Blues:

Long before his famous performance of this song at Woodstock, Jimi recorded this studio version with Billy Cox and Buddy Miles at the same May 1969 session which yielded “Hear My Train A Comin'” and “Bleeding Heart” also featured on this album.  Never fully finished, the song stands as an example of the fertile ideas he hoped to harness and bring to fruition.

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