Peter Cincotti successfully re-invents himself again on new lp

Peter Cincotti is quite the interesting artist.  Audiences and critics alike likened him to the next Harry Connick, Jr. on the release of his first two records.  Then on his third full length release, “East of Angel Town”, Cincotti surprised everybody by re-inventing himself in a more pop sense.  Now with his fourth full length release, “Metropolis”, Cincotti has re-invented himself yet again.  “Metropolis” is an interesting mix of pop sensibility and borderline techno that even brings along some elements of “East of Angel Town.”

The album’s opener/title track is a techno-esque piece is unlike anything that Cincotti has recorded before.  But it’s a fitting open as it lets audiences know right up front that this is an entirely different record from his previous releases.  He follows that up with a straight forward rock style song in ‘My Religion.’  He sings of how he simply can’t get a certain woman out of his mind in this piece.  He sings, “I’m making you my religion.”  That’s not to mean he’s obsessed with said woman.  Rather, he’s just all about her.  The dance/rock combo style makes for a really interesting listen.

The first two songs on “Metropolis” are quite the change from the sound on Cincotti’s first three albums.  And just when listeners think that Cincotti can’t change things up any more, he switches gears again on ‘Do or Die.’  This song is an excellent radio friendly single that could help to springboard Peter Cincotti to major mainstream fame.  In ‘Do or Die’, Cincotti sings about trying to figure out how to talk to a woman in whom he’s interested.  He sings, “It’s do or die\for you and I\I can’t let it just pass me by\without knowing\if we’ll ever get together…I need a topic of conversation\Something a little more than\ hi, how ya doin’ laet me get your number\Don’t wanna be that guy.”  He goes on about what he’s thinking in his head what he could say to strike up a conversation with the woman in question.  The catchy little keyboard riff near the song’s end adds a little “spice” to the song.  It makes it that much catchier and poppier. If ever there were a lead off single for this album, ‘Do or Die is it. 

‘Do or Die’ isn’t the only radio ready single on “Metropolis.”  ‘Nothing’s Enough’ is another great song.  It comes across as social commentary of sorts on our obsession with excesses. Hee sings, “I’m on by blackberry while I’m running on the treadmill/on my bluetooth talkin’/trying to keep my head still/Got the tv on/flippin’ through the channels browsin’/Why stay on one when ya got 2,000.”  He also makes mention of people that don’t stay faithful in their relationship because they just have to have more than that one person.  As poppy as the song is, it comes across as a scathing indictment of our culture of excess, warning of the dangers of it.  The combination of the catchy music and the hard hitting lyrics makes this another of the highlights of “Metropolis.” 

Speaking of relationships, another of the album’s highlights is another relationship based song in ‘Fit You better.’  Cincotti sings on this song, “We’re the perfect opposites\When you gonna see?\No one goes with you better or gets you better\No one’s ever gonna fit you better than me.”  The funny thing of this song is that it’s in direct contradiction to ‘Do or Die.’  With ‘Do or Die’, listeners got a glimpse of someone who was really nervous aroudn a certain female character.  ‘Fit You Better’ presents a male lead who is much more self confident.  And he lets his female interest know it.

While ‘Do or Die’ and ‘Fit You Better’ show two entirely different sides of a certain individual, there’s one more song that shows a wholly different side in itself.  That song is ‘Forever and Always.’  Cincotti sings on this track, “I tried like hell to fight this feeling\told myself, it’s nothing more\than just another phase I’m going through\I tried to keep it nice and simple\be the guy I was before\And not do anything he wouldn’t do\But everytime I’d pull in the reins\go back to short term me I used to call it\it’s not the same.”  This isn’t the first song of its style.  But there’s a certain catchiness to the music that makes it another great, catchy up-tempo radio ready single. 

“Metropolis” is quite the change for Peter Cincotti from his self titled, jazz themed debut record that was released over nine years ago.  In all the changes that he’s shown from that debut to where he is now, Peter Cincotti has proven why he is the great artist that he is.  He reinvents himself, rather than taking the easy way out and being redundant with his sound.  If the key to comedy is timing, then he has proven that the key to sucess in the entertainment business truly is originality.  He has taken risks over and over.  And every risk has proven a good one.  This time is no different.  Even if it doesn’t break him out to mainstream pop success, “Metropolis” has proven Peter Cincotti to be not only one of the best jazz or pop artists of the current era, but one of the greatest artists period of his time.

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