Wood’s Latest LP Is Caught Between Good And Great

Courtesy: HOLMZ Music/Andy Wood Music LLC

Courtesy: HOLMZ Music/Andy Wood Music LLC

Guitarist Andy Wood is most widely known for his work with Creed front man Scott Stapp when Stapp is not recording with his band mates in Creed.  Wood has displayed his own share of talent in his work with Stapp.  With the release of his latest solo album Caught Between The Truth and a Lie, Wood has displayed even more talent.  Throughout the course of the double-disc record, Wood displays his chops as a rock guitarist once more.  That is not the most interesting aspect of this record.  It is his talent within the worlds of country and bluegrass that will really catch audiences’ ears on this new release.  That span of musical talents is the key to the enjoyment of Caught Between The Truth and a Lie.  Throughout the course of the album, Wood mixes things multiple times, throwing instrumentals alongside full compositions.  That stylistic mix of music makes this record even more enjoyable for audiences whether or not said audiences are familiar with Wood’s solo work.  Last but not least worth noting in the album’s success is its sequencing.  Wood doesn’t just go from one genre to another.  He actually slowly transitions from bluegrass to rock to country and back to rock again.  The end result is a work that proves music truly is the universal language as it will most certainly bring together so many different audiences throughout the course of its twenty-four tracks.  By the end, audiences will agree that Between The Truth and a Lie is somewhere between good and great.

Andy Wood’s latest full length solo record Between The Truth and a Lie is, as noted, an album that sits somewhere between good and great. The main reason for this is the range of talent displayed throughout the course of the double album’s twenty-four total tracks.  Wood, who is known largely for his work with rocker Scott Stapp, displays expert bluegrass and country chops right alongside his talents as a rock guitarist throughout the course of the album.  Bluegrass fans will enjoy the old school style of ‘How Mountain Girls Can Love’ and the album’s opener ‘Everybody Loves You.’  Those whose leanings are more in the country realm will enjoy ‘The Ballad of Ricky and Cal’ and the album’s closer ‘the Cowboy Rides Away.’  There was nowhere for this song to go than at the album’s end considering its title.  And Wood’s gentle, bluesy guitar work shows why, too.  Rock fans aren’t left out, either.  Wood offers his rock fans ‘Of Elf and Man’ (perhaps paying homage to Metallica’s ‘Of Wolf and Man?’), ‘Got A Light’ and the toned down cover of Led Zeppelin’s ‘Fool in the Rain.’  There’s even a jazzy piece thrown in for good measure in the form of ‘Dracula and His Cooky, Spooky Band.’  The use of the horns and Latin percussion alongside Wood’s own talents will have audiences up and dancing on this track, especially with Halloween now just around the corner.  The songs noted here are just some examples of Wood’s versatility on this record.  It goes without saying that said versatility is displayed quite well.  The enjoyment doesn’t end there, either.  The sequencing of the songs throughout the record makes the journey from start to finish all the more enjoyable.

The variety of sounds that Wood includes throughout the course of new record is in itself more than enough reason for audiences to give this album at least one listen.  If audiences aren’t convinced by that aspect, then perhaps the stylistic differences in the songs will convince audiences.  Stylistically speaking, the songs that make up Between The Truth and a Lie are both full compositions complete with vocals and instrumental tracks.  Wood balanced that mix quite well, too making sure not to stay on the full compositions or the instrumental pieces for too long.  It shows that he and all involved behind the glass put a lot of thought into the album’s overall presentation.  Speaking of that thought, the mix of musical genres and styles together make for plenty of reason for audiences to check out Andy Wood’s new album.  If there is still anyone not convinced as to why they should check out Between The Truth and a Lie by now, then perhaps an examination of the album’s sequencing will convince said audiences.

The musical mix of genres and styles that make up Between The Truth and a Lie are equally important to the album in terms of its enjoyment.  They would be nothing without the album’s sequencing, though. It would have been so easy for Wood and those behind the glass to randomly toss the album’s songs in throughout the record.  But that didn’t happen.  Rather, the album gradually progress from Wood’s bluegrass sound to a more rock oriented sound and then back to a country sound.  It is done with such precision that the progression is almost unnoticeable to the untrained ear. Those that listen closely though, will hear the slow change.   It’s especially nice to hear that change happen gradually instead of suddenly.  That is because it makes the album in whole all the easier on the ears.  Combined with the songs themselves and their difference in style, it makes the album one that will bring audiences of all ages and interests together, proving true once more the adage that music truly is the universal language.  And that language is sure to bring together every person that gives this record a chance.

Caught Between The Truth and a Lie is available now in stores and online.  More information on the album, Wood’s tour dates and latest updates is available online at:

Website: http://www.andywoodmusic.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Andy-Wood/123741651016472

Twitter: http://twitter.com/awoodshreds

Myspace: http://www.myspace.com/awoodshreds

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