PBS’ New Nature DVD Is One Of The Series’ Best Episodes So Far This Year

Courtesy:  PBS/PBS Distribution

Courtesy: PBS/PBS Distribution

Every year thousands of students at schools across the country are taught that humans are at the top of the evolutionary ladder. They are taught that humans sit atop that ladder because of their ability to differentiate right from wrong, to feel emotions, and so many other reasons. However anyone that has watched PBS’ hit wildlife series Nature knows that humans may very well not be the top of the evolutionary chain. Now PBS has proven this yet again with the new Nature episode Natural Born HustlersNature’s Best Con Artists. This new episode of Nature will be available on DVD tomorrow, March 8th. This episode is yet another “wildly” engaging presentation. It is another presentation that proves why Nature is television’s best wildlife series and why PBS is the last bastion of truly worthwhile programming on television. The main reason for this is the breadth of information that is shared over the course of the program’s roughly three-hour run time. Just as important to note of the program is the fact that it is clearly divided up into three separate segments. This includes not just internally but in terms of its menu, too. That will be discussed later. Last but hardly least of note in this episode of Nature is its cinematography. The venues chosen for the feature are stunning to say the least and the animals often times exotic. The way in which it was all captured makes it all worth the watch. Each element is in its own right important to the program’s overall presentation. Altogether they make Nature: Natural Born HustlersNature’s Best Con Artists one of the series’ best episodes so far this year and yet more proof of why the series is television’s best wildlife series. It also serves to once again show why PBS remains today the last bastion of truly worthwhile programming on television.

Nature: Natural Born HustlersNature’s Best Con Artists is one of the best episodes of Nature that PBS has turned out so far this year. That says quite a bit considering the quality episodes that have already been turned out so far this year. It shows this in a number of ways, the main one being the breadth of information shared throughout the episode. Over the course of its roughly three-hour run time viewers learn about the different methods that animals use for offense, defense, and for the survival of their respective next generations. Audiences will be surprised at times and shocked at others to learn about the ways in which they do that. From disruptive camouflage to sexual dimorphism (essentially the animal kingdom’s version of cross dressing, only genetically) to sleight of hand (yes, even magic so to speak) animals use a number of methods in order to survive in their given ecosystems. Audiences will be shocked to learn that some animals even resort to criminal behavior of sort in order to survive. For instance, sea otters will use what is called “ransom behavior” in order to obtain food. It is exactly what it sounds like. The males will actually kidnap young otters in order to make their mothers come for them. The mothers will then come and drop food that they have found thus allowing the males to steal said food. There is also a bird in Africa that cons other birds by acting as a watch-out for them and building their trust that viewers will learn about. Think that’s bad? Well how about kangaroos in Australia? It turns out that some kangaroos will actually resort to cheating in order to avoid conflict with larger male kangaroos. And according to the presentation, the females often even let the smaller males inseminate them. And in the realm of crustaceans apparently size does matter to some female crabs as viewers will learn. That will be left for viewers to find out for themselves along with all of the other cons that animals around the world use in order to survive. All things considered here, the cons that animals use for their survival are numerous. What’s more they show an extremely high level of intelligence; much higher than most humans might have otherwise thought. Whether one is a student of the biological sciences or just a lover of all things animals, audiences of all types will find plenty here by which to be surprised and shocked. Keeping that in mind, audiences will agree in watching this program that its wide expanse of information is more than enough reason to watch the program. It isn’t the only reason that audiences will want to see this episode of Nature, though. The program’s separation both internally and in its menu is another reason for viewers to pick up this episode of Nature.

The vast amount of information provided in Nature: Natural Born HustlersNature’s Best Con Artists is more than enough reason for audiences to see this episode of Nature. It is hardly the only reason for audiences to add this episode to their home DVD libraries. The program’s segmentation both internally and externally it is separated out rather than presented as one extended three-hour episode. The first segment presents the cons that animals use in order to evade predators. The second turns the tables and shows how predators fool their prey. The third and final segment shows the cons that animals use in order to ensure the survival of the next generation of their species. Audiences will be glad to know that should they start on the first or second segment neither segment will auto run the next segment once it is over. This is helpful for audiences whether in a classroom setting or a living room. It gives each segment a fully defined start and end versus leaving audiences feeling that they will miss anything in those programs that run continuously. Said programs do sadly exit. And audiences will agree just how aggravating said programs can be because of that continuous structure. What’s more narrator Kevin Draine gives a clear transition at the end of all three programs, setting up the second and third segments clearly and even rounding out everything at the end of the episode’s final segment. Some will take this aspect of the program for granted. But in the grand scheme of things such clear and precise separation of segments both internally and externally makes for a viewing experience that is certain to keep viewers engaged from beginning to end of each segment. It is one more way in which this episode of Nature proves itself to be one of the series’ best episodes so far this year and why, again, PBS is the last bastion of truly worthwhile programming on television.

Both the information presented in Nature: Natural Born HustlersNature’s Best Con Artists and the episode’s structure are key to its overall presentation. Both play their own important part in ensuring that audiences will remain fully engaged in the program from one segment to the next. Of course they are not the only elements that make this episode such a hit for the series and for PBS. The program’s cinematography rounds out its most notable elements. Over the course of the program’s three-hour run time audiences are taken from the cities of North America to the jungles of South America and even to different African countries well beyond. It takes audiences to nearly every corner of the globe, even beneath the waves of the Great Barrier Reef to examine how sharks use camouflage to hunt their prey. Each journey presents beautiful footage of the presented regions. There are stunning aerial shots that take viewers over waterfalls and jungles at some points. At others audiences are presented with equally breathtaking undersea footage of different aquatic ecosystems and back on land of the African plains just to name a few examples. Regardless of which region and ecosystem is displayed it can be said that those behind the lens captured footage that will leave viewers transfixed thanks to the rich colors of the given regions and the equally powerful juxtapositions of the animals to their surroundings. That is just the tip of the iceberg, too. The footage of the animals themselves is just as impressive. Audiences actually get to get up close to a lizard to discover how it keeps itself from casting a shadow in order to hide itself from predators in one segment. In another audiences actually get to stand (figuratively speaking) along with researchers as they watch how capuchin monkeys react to the sound of invaders. And as it sits, waiting to strike its prey viewers even get to see an orchid mantis at work. These are just a few more examples of how this episode of Nature’s cinematography plays a role in the episode’s overall presentation. It is an important part, too needless to say. It also rounds out the episode’s most important elements. Together with the program’s broad swath of information and its clear and precise segmentation, all three elements work together to show yet again why this episode of Nature is one of its best episodes so far this year. They also work together to prove yet again why PBS is the last bastion of truly worthwhile programming on television.

Nature: Natural Born HustlersNature’s Best Con Artists is one of the best episodes of Nature’s best episodes to be turned out so far this year. This is thanks in large part to the breadth of its sometimes surprising and sometimes shocking information about animal behaviors. The information in question shows that despite what people want to think humans might not be the top of the evolutionary ladder. That is because their cons show quite a bit of intelligence—an almost human level intelligence (not always for good, either). It is something that will most certainly keep viewers engaged from beginning to end. The program’s segmentation both internally and externally is just as important to its presentation. They are clear and precise both within the episode and in the episode’s menu and in turn are just as certain to keep viewers fully engaged. The program’s cinematography rounds out its presentation. Between the footage of the different ecosystems and the animals that inhabit said ecosystems, those behind the lens are to be hugely applauded for their work. If for no other reason than the cinematography audiences will want to see this three-part episode of Nature. Each element, as it can be seen now, plays its own important part in the presentation of Nature: Natural Born HustlersNature’s Best Con Artists. Altogether they make Nature: Natural Born HustlersNature’s Best Con Artists one of the best episode of Nature to be turned out so far this year and even more proof of why PBS remains the last bastion of truly worthwhile programming on television today. It will be available Tuesday, March 8th and can be ordered direct online via PBS’ online store at http://www.shoppbs.org/product/index.jsp?productId=85258466&cp=&kw=nature+natural+born+hustlers&origkw=nature+natural+born+hustlers&sr=1. More information on this and other episodes of Nature is available online now at:

 

Website: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/PBSNature

Twitter: http://twitter.com/PBSNature

 

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