‘SOTD: Teotihuacan’s Lost Kings’ Is Another Enjoyable Discovery From PBS

Courtesy:  PBS/Public Media Distribution

Courtesy: PBS/Public Media Distribution

The ancient Mexican city of Teotihuacan has for centuries been a source of mystery and intrigue for people around the world.  That is because of how little has been known about the city including how it came to be built, its people and their culture and even what happened to the people who once called it home.  That was until 2003 when a rainstorm revealed a long-hidden tunnel that some surprising finds.  Late last month PBS presented a new episode of its hit history based series Secrets of the Dead that was centered on that find in Secrets of the Dead: Teotihuacan’s Lost Kings.  Now audiences can own that episode for themselves on DVD.  There is a lot to appreciate about this DVD beginning with the story at the episode’s center.  The information that is provided within the story is just as important to note as the story.  It is just another of the program’s most important elements.  The footage that is used in order to tell the story rounds out its most important elements.  It brings the program’s presentation full circle and shows together with those previously noted elements why this episode of Secrets of the Dead is yet another enjoyable experience for educators and history buffs alike.

Secrets of the Dead: Teotihuacan’s Lost Kings is yet another enjoyable installment of PBS’ hit history-based series Secrets of the Dead. This is proven in part through the story presented at the heart of the episode.  The story at the heart of the episode follows archaeologist Sergio Gomez as he searches long-hidden tunnel that lies below the Temple of the Plumed Serpent.  The tunnel was discovered after heavy rains uncovered it in 2003.  As Gomez and his team of researchers dig through the site, surprising theories and revelations are made about not just the tunnel and the temple under which it runs but also about the city and its history.  The theories and revelations come from evidence uncovered in the operation including what looks like a hand print that had long been preserved and stones found at the heart of the tunnel among other items.  Throughout it all the ancient city and its central temple are put in a whole new light thanks to the story.  It is thanks to all of this that the episode’s central story will keep audiences of all ages engaged and informed from beginning to end.  Of course even as informative and engaging as the story proves to be in the long run, it is just one part of what makes this episode of Secrets of the Dead so enjoyable.  The information that is shared throughout the course of the episode is just as important to its presentation as its story.

There is no question that the story at the center of Secrets of the Dead: Teotihuacan’s Lost Kings is an important part of the episode’s presentation in its new home release.  The episode’s central story is just one part of what makes this episode so enjoyable.  The information that is included in the story is just as important to its presentation as its story.  The most important information presented in the episode is the factual historical information.  That information includes not just the city’s (and temple’s) known history but also the theories and revelations made through the group’s work.  Among that material is the belief that the ancient city was built by people who came from its surrounding areas.  It is theorized that the very first people to settle the city did so after fleeing their own former homes, which were destroyed by a volcano.  As the city grew and thrived, it is said that it grew outward, with its growth even being compared to that of Rome. That comparison comes from the belief that the city’s people spread out into its surrounding regions and conquered those regions, thus expanding its empire.  Perhaps most intriguing of the provided information is the belief of how the city met its end so to speak.  It is speculated by researchers that a natural disaster dramatically impacted the area and that the city was unable to fully recover from that disaster, thus leading its inhabitants to simply leave the city and search for a safer area.   This is so interesting to learn because of the belief that the city’s original inhabitants had themselves ironically fled another natural disaster before founding Teotihuacan.  These are just some of the interesting pieces of information that are shared over the course of the program.  There is much for audiences to take in over the course of its roughly hour-long run time.  They will discover it all when they order the DVD themselves via PBS’ online store.

Both the story at the center of Secrets of the Dead: Teotihuacan’s Lost Kings and its information are key elements in the program’s presentation.  The pair works hand in hand to make this episode of Secrets of the Dead well worth the watch both by educators and history buffs alike.  They are not the program’s only key elements.  The footage that is used to help tell the city’s story rounds out the episode’s most important elements.  It brings the presentation full circle. The footage that is used throughout the episode includes both actual footage of the dig and computer animations to help tell the episode’s story.  There are even some re-enactments that are incorporated into the story alongside the dig footage and computer animations.  Audiences will be glad to see that throughout the course of the movie all of these elements are expertly balanced.  No one piece of footage is ever used more than another at any one point in the story.  Each piece of footage is used at just the right moment and in just the right way.  The end result is a story that is just as visually entertaining as it is educational and informative.  When that balanced footage is set against the episode’s central story and the information provided through the story, all three elements work together to make the episode in whole, again, well worth the watch among educators and history buffs alike.  They combine to make Secrets of the Dead: Teotihuacan’s Lost Kings one more of 2016’s top new documentaries.

Secrets of the Dead: Teotihuacan’s Lost Kings is yet another impressive episode of PBS’ hit history-based series Secrets of the Dead.  It is also one more of 2016’s top new documentaries.  That is proven in part through the story at the heart of the episode.  The story focuses not just on the legendary city’s history but also uses actual evidence to make educational theories about the city’s foundation and the fate of its people.  It doesn’t even try to tackle the countless conspiracy theories that abound in regards to both topics.  Audiences will be especially appreciative of that.  Speaking of those conspiracy theories (and the lack thereof), the information that is provided throughout the course of the story adds to the episode’s interest.  The information presented includes factual information, educated hypotheses, and revelations made via physical evidence.  There are no conspiracy theories to be heard at any point.  That makes the program all the more engaging.  The footage that is used throughout the program is just as well-balanced as the episode’s information and story in general.  All three elements work together seamlessly to make this episode of Secrets of the Dead wholly engaging and entertaining for educators and history buffs alike.  It is available online now via PBS’ online store.  More information on this and other episodes of Secrets of the Dead is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://pbs.org/secrets

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SecretsofTheDead

Twitter: http://twitter.com/SecretsPBS

 

 

 

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