80s New Wave, Electronica Fans Will Appreciate Moscow Noir’s New Self-Titled EP

Courtesy: Aurealis Records/Tutone Entertainment

Courtesy: Aurealis Records/Tutone Entertainment

Late this past July, Moscow Noir released its latest recording to the masses.  The self-titled, seven-song record is the Canadian outfit’s debut offering. It goes without saying that the record, with its hugely synth-driven songs, is a good fit for anyone that is a fan of Daft Punk or the 80s new wave acts that clearly influenced the duo’s own sound.  One of the songs that most well represents what this record has to offer is its instrumental opener ‘Odisea.’  That will be discussed shortly.  ‘Stars,’ the record’s third track, is another one of its key compositions.  That will be discussed later.  ‘Control’ is one more example of what makes this record stand out for 80s new wave fans.  It is not the last song that could be cited to support that argument either.  There are four other songs included in this record that could just as easily support that statement, too.  This song and the other two noted here are just the three songs that this critic feels best represent the record.  All things considered, Moscow Noir’s new self-titled EP proves in the end to be an offering that 80s new wave fans will appreciate just as much as modern electronica fans.

Moscow Noir’s self-titled debut EP is a record that 80s new wave fans will appreciate just as much as modern electronica fans.  It shows this clearly throughout the course of its seven songs. One of the songs that serves to best exhibit this is the record’s opener ‘Odisea.’  The song runs a little more than two and a half minutes and is a fully instrumental offering.  The song’s arrangement instantly conjures thoughts of Daft Punk and the work that the electronica duo composed for the soundtrack to Disney’s Tron: Legacy.  That is evident in the arpeggios that make up the base of the arrangement. The ethereal feel of the song’s harmony adds even more depth to its arrangement as do the breathy random vocals that are added in to the song as a finishing touch.  Each part plays its own important role in the song’s overall arrangement.  They are just part of what makes the song stand out, though.  The manner in which each part was incorporated into the arrangement makes it stand out even more.

The musical elements that were incorporated into ‘Odisea’ (likely pronounced Odyssey) are in themselves important pieces of the arrangement’s presentation.  While they are integral in their own way to the song’s presentation, they are not the only important piece of the song’s whole.  The manner in which each element was incorporated into the song makes the song stand out even more.  Listeners will note in listening to the song from start to finish that the group didn’t just toss the noted elements in freely.  Rather, the song builds on itself and grows over the course of its 2:33 run time.  That growth doesn’t just happen either.  It is a gradual growth.  That makes the song even more interesting to take in.  When that is considered, it becomes clear why this song was chosen to be the band’s first impression on this record and why it was included in the record’s overall body, too.  It is just one of the record’s most significant compositions, too.  ‘Stars’ is another of the EP’s most notable compositions.

‘Odisea’ is one of the most notable compositions included in Moscow Noir’s new self-titled EP.  That is exhibited through the clearly well-arranged composition and its elements.  It is just one of the songs that make the record stand out, though.  ‘Stars’ comes early in the record’s run.  It is another of the record’s most significant songs.  The song stands out in part through its musical arrangement.  The song’s arrangement stands out right out of the gate (so to speak) due to its solid 2/4 beat and its guitar line. The pairing of the two elements conjures thoughts of The White Stripes’ ‘Seven Nation Army.’  When front man/guitarist Lesther Gutierrez adds in his vocals, things become even more interesting.  His vocal delivery style, when set against the song’s musical arrangement brings about thoughts of Muse.  It’s quite the juxtaposition of sounds.  But it is that juxtaposition that really makes the song’s musical arrangement stand out, and in turn the song in whole.  Of course its arrangement is just one part of the song that makes the song stand out.  Its lyrical content is just as important to note as its musical arrangement.

The musical arrangement presented in ‘Stars’ is in itself a clearly important part of the song’s overall structure.  That is evident in the thought put into the arrangement.  It combines Moscow Noir’s obvious 80s new wave influences with more modern sounds for a composition that is certain to keep listeners engaged.  While the song’s musical arrangement is clearly an important part of the song’s overall structure it is not the only important part of the song that should be examined.  The song’s lyrical content is just as important to note as its musical arrangement.  That is because of the metaphorical language used throughout the song.  Gutierrez sings in the song’s lead verse, “I’m going to take it all/Paraded on a thousand walls/It’s going to make you crawl/Slipping on your tongue/Like an office run/And all the sprites/And all the lights/That dance around and delude/Are going to find their lines/Confined by the singing fool/to find a way/That I can sail it all away into the grey.”  It’s hardly certain what Gutierrez is addressing here.  On one level it could be argued that the song’s subject is openly defying public scrutiny, saying, “I’m fine with being everywhere and I don’t care what it does to you, even if you don’t like it.”  The problem with that interpretation is that later in the verse, the subject sings about wanting to sail away into the grey, or into obscurity, so to speak.  It’s as if the subject is contradicting himself, saying I don’t care if all eyes are on me, I just want to get away and be forgotten.  Listeners should be reminded that this is just this critic’s own interpretation of the song’s lyrical content.  The song’s chorus makes things even more obscure as Gutierrez sings, “And I crumble/All the stars surrounding me.”  The same can be said of the song’s second verse.  It is just as ambiguous in its use of metaphors.  That being the case, the song’s lyrical content is certain to keep listeners just as engaged as the song’s musical arrangement.  Both elements are certain to keep listeners talking well after the song ends.  When they are combined, the song’s musical arrangement and its lyrical content clearly show why it is another one of the EP’s most significant compositions.  It is not the record’s last standout song, though.  ‘Control,’ which comes late in the record’s sequence, is one more of the record’s most significant additions.

“Odisea’ and ‘Stars’ are both key compositions featured in Moscow Noir’s new self-titled EP.  That is due to the combination of the songs’ musical arrangements and the lyrical content presented in the latter composition.  Both elements are certain to keep listeners completely engaged, and even leave listeners talking.  They are not the only songs that stand out in this new offering from the Canda-based electronic outfit.  ‘Control’ stands out just as much as those songs.  Just as with the aforementioned songs, ‘Control’ stands out in part due to its musical arrangement.  The song’s arrangement is another work that conjures thoughts of Daft Punk and its predecessors due to its synth-driven presentation.  It is just one part of what makes the song stand out, too.  The song’s lyrical content serves to make the song stand out just as much as its musical arrangement.

The synth-driven musical arrangement at the heart of ‘Control’ is in itself an important part of the song’s presentation.  That is because  it is another way in which Moscow Noir exhibits the influence of Daft Punk and others of that ilk on its music.  It is just one part of what makes the song stand out. The song’s lyrical content is just as important to note in examining this song as its musical arrangement. The song’s lyrical content presents a subject addressing another person in regards to a relationship.  At least that is how the song’s lyrical content comes across to this critic.  That inference is made as Gutierrez sings in the song’s lead verse, “I want to lose control/Cause I/I can’t fool no more/You’re why I want to sell my soul/You’re why I tend to lose control/I, I’m surrounded by doors/That hide/My red light…/This high burns right out of my pores/You’re why I can’t gain control.”  It appears through this that the song’s subject is addressing someone of the opposite sex, and that subject in question has quite the impact on him or her.  He or she is saying, I lose control when I’m around you.  One must admit that’s quite a person. Considering this seeming topic and the song’s musical arrangement, both elements work together to make the song yet another composition that stands out among the record’s offerings.  It is hardly the last of the record’s songs that stands out.  It joins with the other songs noted here, and the record’s other four songs to show in whole why any 80s new wave fan and any modern electronica fan will appreciate Moscow Noir’s self-titled debut EP.

Moscow Noir’s new self-titled debut EP is a record that 80s new wave fans and modern-day electronica fans will equally appreciate.  That is due to the musical arrangements presented within each song and the songs’ lyrical themes.  The songs that are presented here are, collectively, just a small sampling of how that mix of material makes the record stand out for its target audiences.  When those songs are joined with the record’s other four offerings, the record in whole proves to be a work that, again, will reach its target audiences with ease.  Moscow Noir is available now in stores and online.  More information on the group’s new self-titled debut EP is available now along with all of its latest news and more at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.moscownoir.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/MoscowNoir

 

 

 

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