Pareidolia’s New LP Should Not Be “Denied” The Attention That It Deserves

Courtesy: Chipster PR

Courtesy: Chipster PR

Early this summer underground hard rock act Pareidolia released its latest full-length studio recording Denied Truths.  The album, released independently by the New York-based quartet, is a good effort.  It is a presentation that shows real promise for the band given the right support and the right amount of support.  That is due in part to the variety of arrangements presented throughout the record’s 13 tracks.  That will be discussed shortly.  The lyrical themes that are presented throughout the record are just as important to note in the album’s presentation as its musical arrangements.  That will be discussed later.  Last but hardly least of note in the album’s presentation is its sequencing.  Each element is obviously important in its own right.  All things considered, Denied Truths proves to be an album that should not be denied the coverage that it deserves.

Pareidolia’s new album Denied Truths is a record that should not be denied the coverage that it deserves.  That is due in no small part to the variety of arrangements that are exhibited throughout its 13-song body.  The album opens with a metalcore arrangement in ‘Quench The Fire’ before turning to a more early 90s rock vibe in ‘Leave Me Alive.’  From there, the album moves to a more modern hard rock style arrangement in the album’s third song, ‘Betrayed Within.’  The album’s next trio of tracks instantly conjure thoughts of In Flames, Alter Bridge, and certain power rock bands respectively with even a certain lick that would make Tom Morello proud in ‘Die Living.’  The record’s next grouping of songs presents elements of Evergrey, Joe Satriani, and certain modern hard rock acts.  The album closes out with four songs that show just as much variety between them as that which is displayed among the rest of the record’s arrangements.  There are elements of Dragonforce and so many other acts displayed through the record’s last four songs.  Simply put, the variety of arrangements exhibited from the beginning of this record prove to be hugely important to the record’s presentation.  It forms a foundation that is certain to keep listeners engaged.  The band builds on that foundation with lyrical themes within each song that are just as certain to keep listeners engaged as the album’s musical arrangements.

The musical arrangements that are exhibited throughout the course of Denied Truths are hugely important to the record’s presentation.  That is due to the fact that they display so much variety yet a certain sense of focus throughout the album’s 56-minute run time.  As important as the album’s musical arrangements prove to be to the album’s presentation, they are not the album’s only important collective element.  The lyrical themes that are presented throughout the album are just as important to note in examining the album’s presentation as its musical arrangements.  That is because they are just as varied as the album’s arrangements.  ‘Leave Me Alive’ is just one example of that variance in the songs’ lyrical themes.  The song comes across lyrically as a piece that takes on the time honored topic of a broken relationship.  That is inferred as front man Chandler Mogel sings, “Wanted/One chance/To leave all the lies where we died/Instead you left me haunted/In one glance/So why did you leave me alive.”  The odds are that he is not talking about someone dying, but speaking metaphorically.  He closes the song, asking the addressed subject, “Is this what you wanted/One chance/To keep all the lies locked inside/Instead you left me haunted/In one glance/So why did you leave me alive.”  It is definitely an interesting way to address what seems to be a song about a broken relationship, if that is indeed what Mogel is addressing.  It is just one of the songs that proves the diversity within the album’s lyrical themes.

‘Leave Me Alive’ is a clear example of the diversity exhibited throughout Denied Truths.  That is due both to the song’s lyrical content and approach to that content.  ‘Quench The Fire’ is another song that exhibits that diversity among the albums’ lyrical themes.  The song presents a much more positive, driven message in its lyrical content.  That is evident right from the song’s opening lines in which Mogel sings, “I was a lost machine – on shattered streets I washed my visions clean/Now it’s adrenaline that makes me see what I need to believe/Life on the fast train/Steal away – they’ll try to find a way to douse my flame/My dying day’s not just a breath away/This is what I’ve become/I play the real game.”  He goes on in the song’s chorus to sing, “Comin’ down hard on me/My burning heart’ll set me free/You can call me a liar/But you’ll never quench the fire.”  The message presented in that first verse and chorus is pretty clear.  It is a message of positivity; a message of determination.  That message is delivered just as strongly throughout the remainder of the song’s verses, too.  It is the polar opposite of the theme presented in ‘Leave Me Alive,’ again exhibiting that diversity in the album’s lyrical themes.  It still is not the last song that exhibits that diversity either.  ‘All As One’ is yet another example of the diversity exhibited in the album’s lyrical themes.

‘Leave Me Alive’ and ‘Quench The Fire’ are both clear examples of the diversity exhibited in Denied Truths’ lyrical themes.  Both songs stand out against one another (and the rest of the album’s songs) in their lyrical themes.  ‘All As One’ stands out in its lyrical theme from its counterparts just as much as ‘Leave Me Alive’ and ‘Quench The Fire.’  Mogel leaves listeners really thinking and talking here as he sings in the song’s chorus, “The lights are gonna fade/And the nights are gonna stay/The fire burns away in time/I don’t wanna wait to fall and pray/Til the flowers turn to gray/All as one I say.”  This is an interesting statement.  Mogel comes across as saying while things will end, he doesn’t want to wait for things to end to take advantage of a situation.  That is just this critic’s own take on these lines.  It should not be taken as gospel.  The song’s verses add even more interest.  Case in point the song’s second verse in which Mogel sings, “I’m out in the fields tonight/Drifting between all of the memories/Teardrops and rain now collide/It’s part of a newborn journey/Even in dreams we still try/To reach for the one who can make it alright.”  Whether or not Mogel is addressing a certain statement about personal faith is anyone’s guess.  But considering the song’s other verses, one can’t help but wonder.  Regardless of the message being sent here, it is clear that the song’s lyrical theme again stands on its own merits and is nothing like that of the album’s other songs, including the songs directly noted here.  When that is taken into consideration, it is one more way in which the diversity in the album’s lyrical themes proves to be just as important to the album’s presentation as the diversity in the album’s musical arrangements.

The diversity in Denied Truths’ musical arrangements and lyrical themes is hugely important to each matter and collectively.  That diversity establishes a foundation that is rock solid (bad pun fully intended).  As important as the diversity in the album’s musical arrangements and lyrical themes is to the album’s presentation, it is not all that should be noted of the album’s presentation. The album’s sequencing is just as important to note as its collective diversity.  Listeners will note that from the beginning of the album to its end, the album switches gears constantly.  It does so without ever missing a step either.  It keeps its energy up throughout each song and keeps listeners just as engaged with its varied lyrical themes as with its musical arrangements.  Considering this, the album’s sequencing was well thought out.  When this is set against the distinct diversity exhibited in both the album’s musical arrangements and lyrical themes, it makes even clearer why this record is one that should not be denied the coverage that it deserves.

Denied Truths is a good effort from Pareidolia.  It is a record that shows real promise for the upstart New York-based four piece band.  That is because of the diversity that is exhibited both in the album’s musical arrangements and its lyrical content.  The album’s well-thought out sequencing is the finishing touch to the foundation formed by that previously noted diversity.  Each element is clearly important in its own right to the album’s presentation.  All things considered, Denied Truths proves to be a record that should not be denied the attention that it so rightly deserves.  It is available now online.  More information on Denied Truths is available online now along with all of Pareidolia’s latest news and more at http://www.facebook.com/thePareidoliaBand.

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