Audiences Of All Ages Will Enjoy The Deedle Deedle Dees’ Latest Musical History Lesson

Courtesy: Sugar Mountain PR

Courtesy: Sugar Mountain PR

Late last month, veteran family music act The Deedle Deedle Dees released its latest full-length studio recording Sing-a-Long History, Volume 2: The Rocket Went Up to the masses.  The record is the follow-up to the group’s 2009 album American History + Rock and Roll = The Deedle Deedle Dees.  Regardless of whether or not audiences are familiar with this New York-based outfit, audiences will agree in experiencing this new record that is has plenty to offer listeners beginning with its musical diversity.  That will be discussed shortly.  The album’s lyrical topics are just as diverse as its musical arrangements.  That will be discussed later.  While it may sound far-fetched, the record’s track listing is also important to the record’s presentation believe it or not.  Each element plays its own important part to the record’s presentation.  All things considered, Sing-a-Long History, Volume 2: The Rocket Went Up proves to be a record that is invaluable both in a classroom and in the living room.

Sing-a-Long History, Volume 2: The Rocket Went Up is an invaluable addition to any elementary level classroom and to any living room.  That is due in no small part to the record’s musical diversity.  From its beginning to its end the album reaches into sixteen different genres as it entertains and educates its young listeners beginning with a double presentation in the album’s opener ‘Houdini.’  The song opens with a few bars of light ragtime before switching very quickly to a more rockabilly feel as front man Lloyd Miller sings about trying to recreate one of escape artist Harry Houdini’s great escapes.  That’s only the beginning, too.  ‘Super Strong’ presents something of a neo folk/pop sound.  On the exact opposite end of the spectrum is the 80s-influenced arrangement at the center of ‘Tesla vs. Edison’ and the Beastie Boys style arrangement at the base of ‘Ada Lovelace.’  These are just some of the examples of the musical diversity that is exhibited throughout The Deedle Deedle Dees’ new album.  If that isn’t enough for listeners, the country/bluegrass foundation of ‘Take My Hand,’ the laid back, almost reggae-infused arrangement of ‘Dissolve,’ and the early 90’s r&b-influenced arrangement presented in the album’s closer, ‘I Remember You, Lucy,’ will most certainly entertain audiences across the board.  Between those arrangements, the previously discussed arrangements, and those that form the foundation of the album’s other songs, the musical diversity exhibited throughout this record is clear.  It shows just as clearly why it is so important to the record’s overall presentation, too.  Of course as important as the record’s musical diversity proves to be, it is not the album’s only notable element.  The diversity of the album’s lyrical topics is just as important to note as its musical diversity.

The musical diversity that is exhibited throughout Single-a-Long History, Volume 2: The Rocket Went Up is in its own right, an undeniably important element in the record’s presentation.  It is not the album’s only important element either.  The album’s lyrical diversity is just as important to note as its musical diversity.  That is because the band—Lloyd H. Miller (vocals, rhythm guitar, bass), Chris Johnson (piano, keyboards, synth, drum machine, bass, vocals) and Ely Levin (drums, percussion, marimba, synth, electric piano, drum machine, vocals)—covers so many of the world’s most notable people and eras throughout the course of this album.  The first half of the album addresses escape artist Harry Houdini, computer programmer Ada Lovelace, and even the doctors who work so hard to fight ebola among much more.  There is even a piece in ‘This Is For You’ that teaches about self-confidence.  Sure, it breaks the mold established for the majority of the album.  But it is still an extremely important piece of the whole in its own right.  The second half of the album takes on Charles Darwin, Nikolai Tesla and Thomas Edison, Typhoid Mary, and just as many other topics including Nobel Prize winners in ‘Dissolve.’  From beginning to end, the band covers so much lyrical ground that there is not a single dull moment for listeners.  The band offers material that will appeal to educators from grade three through even six.  Sixth grade might be pushing it a little bit.  But one could argue its viability even at that point.  Considering this, the lyrical diversity that is exhibited throughout the course of this album proves in the end to be just as important to the album’s presentation as its musical diversity.  It sill is not the last of the album’s most important elements to note either.  The album’s track listing is just as important to note as its musical and lyrical diversity.

The musical and lyrical diversity that is exhibited throughout The Deedle Deedle Dees’ new album is big part of what makes this record so invaluable both in the classroom and in the living room.  Even with its importance it is not the only important part of the album’s presentation.  The record’s track listing is important, too.  It may sound a bit far-fetched, but it does play its own important part in the album’s presentation.  That part is one of a guide of sorts.  Not only does the album’s track listing guide listeners through the album song by song, but it also provides a very brief yet concise explanation of the subject presented in each song.  Case in point ‘Tesla v. Edison.’  The track listing points out the conflict between the two inventors, which is typically not even taught to students either in the lower grades or high school.  It is nice to see that pointed out and it makes for a great starting point for a classroom discussion on the subject.  The summary provided with ‘Ada Lovelace’ clearly points out that she was the first female computer programmer.  In an age when there is so much emphasis on getting young women interested in such matters as computer science, having this introduction is another great discussion starting point.  It shows just how far back women have been involved in a S.T.E.M. related field.  The short, four-word summary of ‘This Is For You’ says so much in such a small space.  It tells listeners that it is a motivational piece, point-blank.  It is just one more way in which the track listing proves to be just as important to this record as the album’s musical and lyrical diversity.  When it is joined with that diversity, the combination of those elements makes perfectly clear why Sing-a-Long History, Volume 2: The Rocket Went Up is an invaluable addition to any classroom and to any family’s living room.

Sing-a-Long History, Volume 2: The Rocket Went Up is an invaluable addition to any classroom and to any family’s living room.  That is due to its musical and lyrical diversity and to its track listing.  Each element, as discussed previously, is important in its own right to the album’s presentation.  All things considered, the album proves to be a presentation that audiences of all ages will enjoy and one that is, again, invaluable to educators and families alike.  It is available now in stores and online. More information on Sing-a-Long History, Volume 2: The Rocket Went Up is available online along with all of The Deedle Deedle Dees’ latest news and more at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.lloydhmiller.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/thedeedledeedledees

Twitter: http://twitter.com/lloydhmiller

 

 

 

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