Students, Lovers Of Archaeology, Anthropology Will Appreciate New ‘SOTD’ Episode

Courtesy: PBS/PBS Distribution

Courtesy: PBS/PBS Distribution

PBS Distribution is taking audiences back in time in another episode of its hit history-based series Secrets of The Dead as it opens the new year. The episode, After Stonehenge, is an interesting new look at life in one early English settlement and how the settlement met its end.  That central topic is just one of the program’s key elements.  The information provided throughout the program is just as important to note as the program’s central topic.  The program’s audio options may not seem overly important in the grand scheme of things.  But in discussing those options, audiences will see that those options are just as important to note here as the program’s main topic and associated information.  Each element is important in its own way.  All things considered, they make After Stonehenge a program that students and lovers of archaeology and anthropology will want to see time “after” time.

Secrets of the Dead: After Stonehenge is a program that students and lovers of archaeology and anthropology alike will appreciate.  That is due in no small part to the program’s central topic.  The topic in question is that of a Bronze Age settlement discovered in England in 2011.  The settlement, which was discovered at a location called Must Farm, was 3,000 years old and stood on stilts in what was then marshland. Audiences will appreciate in watching this program that while it is titled After Stonehenge, the program’s only mention of Stonehenge comes early in the program.  After that point, there is no mention of the ancient structure to be heard or seen.  This is so important to note because there have been some programs put out by PBS that, despite their titles, have not exactly followed the expected themes of those titles.  This program isn’t one of those cases.  It focuses solely on the settlement and its role in life in mainland Europe during the time in which its inhabitants lived there.  Those behind the program are to be commended for keeping that focus.  It ensures in its own right audiences’ maintained engagement from the beginning to end of the roughly hour-long program.  It is of course just one of the key elements to note in examining this episode of Secrets of the Dead.  The information that is presented throughout the program is just as important to note as the program’s central topic.

The central topic presented in Secrets of the Dead: After Stonehenge is in its own right a key piece of this program’s whole presentation.  That is because those behind the program never allow its focus to stray.  Sadly some of PBS’ programs have been guilty of allowing that to happening.  Though, that luckily didn’t happen here.  It’s just one of the elements that makes this episode of SOTD such an interesting watch.  The information provided throughout the program is key in its own right to the program’s presentation.  One of the most interesting pieces of information provided within the program is the revelation that despite their location, the inhabitants of Must Farm were not solitary people. That is made clear through the discovery of bronze swords and other items that were obviously used for defense.  The fact that the settlement was surrounded by a palisade makes even clearer the settlement’s inhabitants had reason to be concerned for their safety.  This is despite apparently being a mostly peaceful people who thrived on textiles and trade.

Speaking of trade, audiences also learn through the program that the settlement’s inhabitants’ trade routes might have reached as far inland as Italy and Germany.  That is proven through the presentation of glass beads made with items not common to Must Farm at the time.  The bronze stellar mask crafted by the settlement’s inhabitants shows just as much the group’s influence. It presents a precise measurement of the stars used to help determine harvesting and planting times; times that would have applied more to mainland inhabitants than the inhabitants of Must Farm.  It is truly an incredible presentation and just one more piece of information presented throughout the program that proves the importance of the program’s information to its overall presentation.  There is much more that audiences will appreciate than just this including an examination of how the settlement’s end might have come not externally but possibly internally and by accident no less.  All things considered, the information presented throughout this program proves to be just as important as the program’s central topic if not more important and is just one more important piece of the program’s whole.  The program’s audio options play their own integral part in the program’s presentation, too believe it or not.

The central topic of SOTD: After Stonehenge and its expansive information are both important pieces of the program’s overall presentation.  They are just two of its key elements, too.  The audio options presented in the program’s new home release are important in their own right to its overall presentation.  The audio options presented here include not just the standard subtitles for the hard of hearing but also the option of audio description for the blind, too.  This is something that has become increasingly common for PBS’ programs both on DVD and on TV throughout 2016.  It might not seem overly important on the surface.  But in the bigger picture of things, it shows an increased attention to the ADA by the people at PBS, and allows an even broader audience enjoy the program.  Audiences familiar with other older programs released by PBS Distribution don’t include the audio option for the blind community. So to see this option included in the program’s home release enhances its viewing experience and makes it just as laudable.  Again, it seems like a minor detail.  But in the bigger picture of the program’s overall presentation in its home release, it is a huge piece of the program’s whole. When it is set alongside the focus presented in the program’s main topic and interesting information, the whole of this program proves again to be one that students and lovers of archaeology and anthropology will appreciate.

Secrets of the Dead: After Stonehenge is a program that both students and lovers of archaeology and anthropology will appreciate.  It is another episode of PBS’ hit history-based series that shows why this program remains so popular.  The program never loses its focus in its main topic, mentioning Stonehenge only once in its whole length. This is important to note once again because some of PBS’ programs do fall victim to that lack of focus, though thankfully those shortcomings are rare.  Because it maintains its focus, it ensures in itself audiences’ engagement.  The information provided throughout the program ensures that engagement just as much.  The fact that the program offers not only subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing, but also audio descriptive service for the blind is important to note, too.  That is because that is not commonplace for home releases of PBS’ programs.  To see that it is becoming more commonplace is encouraging and is laudable in its own right.  Each element clearly is important in its own right to the program’s overall presentation.  All things considered, this episode of Secrets of the Dead proves itself one that both students and lovers of archaeology and anthropology will appreciate.  It will be available Tuesday and can be ordered online now via PBS’ online store.  More information on this and other episodes of Secrets of the Dead is available online at:

 

 

 

Website: http://pbs.org/secrets

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SecretsofTheDead

Twitter: http://twitter.com/SecretsPBS

 

 

 

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