‘Green Acres: The Complete Series’ Is A Must Have For Any Classic TV Fan

Courtesy: Shout! Factory

Shout! Factory is going “Green” next month.  That is because for the first time ever, the renowned home entertainment company will release to the masses Green Acres: The Complete Series.  The six-season set is currently expected to be released in stores and online Tuesday, Oct. 17.  Those fans who have waited for so long for its release will be happy to know that with this forthcoming release, the wait was well worth it.  That is due in no small part to the episodes.  This will be discussed shortly.  The set’s packaging is another important part of its presentation that cannot and should not be ignored, and will be discussed later.  The bonus material included in this package rounds out its most important elements. Each element is important in its own right to the set’s presentation.  All things considered, the first-ever run of Green Acres: The Complete Series proves, again, to have been well worth the wait and one that is easily one of this year’s best new box sets for grown-ups.

Shout! Factory’s forthcoming release of Green Acres: The Complete Series is a set that fans of the classic sitcom will find was well worth the wait.  That is especially the case considering that its release next month will mark the first time that the show has ever received a full-series treatment.  That is due in part to the episodes presented here.  From start to finish, audiences get all 170 episodes of the classic series, including the series’ rare pilot episode, which even has its own audio commentary track featuring thoughts from pop culture historian Russell Dyball.  That commentary is just one of the bonuses included in the set that will be discussed later.  Getting back on the subject, this set marks the first time that all 170 episodes of the largely family friendly series have ever been released together or otherwise.  What’s more, each episode looks and sounds just as good as they did in their original broadcasts if not better.  This is a real tribute to the series’ fans on the part of Shout! Factory and MGM, and both companies are to be commended for those efforts.  That is just one of the reasons that both companies should be commended here.  The set’s packaging is deserving of just as much praise as the episodes and their presentation.

The packaging used for Green Acres: The Complete Series is once more everything that audiences have come to expect from box sets released via Shout! Factory.  All six seasons of the classic sitcom are set in their own cases with the discs themselves being placed on their own plates inside the boxes.  Even with four discs being placed inside each case (for a total of 24 discs), the cases are still standard single-disc DVD size cases, showing once again how much thought was obviously put into the set’s packaging.  While separating the seasons out into separate cases might have expanded the set’s overall packaging, it is a sacrifice worth having to make in order to preserve the discs, and in turn, the series.  What’s more, even while this method might expand the packaging, it still in essence doesn’t expand it too much.

The physical aspect of the set’s packaging is only one part of what makes this element stand out.  Once again, Shout! Factory has included inside each season’s case, a chronological episode listing for audiences that includes a short but concise summary for each episode, the episode’s original air date and title.  The result here is two-fold.  One on level, the episode title and summary helps audiences decide which episode(s) they want to watch at one point or another.  On another level, the air date serves as its own starting point for perhaps a history lesson on the episode and even the series.  In other words, the set’s packaging is pleasing not just for its physical aspect but for its aesthetic aspect, too.  Keeping all of this in mind, it becomes clear why this collection’s packaging is just as important as its episodes, if not more important.  Of course it is not the last of the set’s most important elements.  The set’s bonus material forms the set’s cornerstone.

The bonus material included with Green Acres: The Complete Series offers just as much entertainment as the series’ episodes if not more.  That is because of its quantity and quality.  As previously noted, the series’ pilot episode can be viewed both by itself and with an isolated audio commentary track from pop culture historian Russell Dyball.  Dyball’s commentary both entertains and informs audiences of all ages with his insight.  The Granby’s Green Acres radio broadcasts, which are also briefly discussed in the bonus featurette Green Acres Is The Place To Be.  Audiences get to experience for themselves here just some of the episodes from the short-lived radio broadcast series, which was the foundation for Green Acres.  After taking in those broadcasts and learning about them through the aforementioned bonus discussion with author Stephen Cox, audiences gain a whole new respect and appreciation for the series in both incarnations.  Speaking of Cox’s discussion, his discussion about Green Acres’ radio roots is just one of so many topics that he covers in his featurette. Along with that discussion, he also touches on the series’ connections to I Love Lucy, The Beverly Hillbillies, Petticoat Junction and other series through casting, production and other topics.  That is just the tip of the iceberg, too.  He also goes into depth about the off-screen friendship between the series’ stars, Eddie Albert and Eva Gabor—there was nothing romantic there, so no one should get their hopes up for any gossip—the fact that Albert and Gabor were not the original picks for the show’s leads and why, the series’ animal stars and their training and even the importance of the series’ theme song as a scene setter for the show among so much more.  Between his in-depth discussions and those from Dyball, audiences get more than they could have hoped for in terms of engagement and entertainment.  The radio broadcasts and Merv Griffin Show appearances starring Albert and Gabor collectively add even more entertainment.  From one item to the next, it is clear that the bonus material included with Green Acres: The Complete Series is pivotal to this set’s presentation.  It collectively succeeds, too.  When it is considered alongside the series’ full 170-episode presentation and the continued standard-setting packaging, all three elements join to make this first-time release one that was well worth the wait and the money.  They join to make the set one of the year’s top new box sets for grown-ups.

Shout! Factory’s upcoming release of Green Acres: The Complete Series is definitely one that was well worth the wait.  It is also one of the year’s top new box sets for grown-ups (and maybe even families in whole, which the world needs more of in this day and age).  From the presentation of its full 170-episode run to its continued bar-setting packaging to its equally entertaining and engaging bonus material, it offers plenty for audiences to appreciate.  Considering that, audiences will agree when they experience it for themselves–once more-that it was well worth the wait and the cost.  It can be pre-ordered online now via Shout! Factory’s online store.  More information on this and other titles from Shout! Factory is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.shoutfactory.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/shoutfactoryofficial

Twitter: http://twitter.com/ShoutFactory

 

 

 

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‘Under Cover’ Will Appeal To Motorhead, Rock Fans Alike

Courtesy: Motorhead Music

Almost two years ago, the rock world lost one of its great icons when Motorhead front man Lemmy Kilmister died from cancer.  When he died, that effectively put an end to one of the musical universe’s greatest acts.  That meant no more new Motorhead music.  Earlier this month though, Motorhead Music–the band’s own label–released a new collection of covers from the band to satiate audiences in the form of Under Cover. The 11-song record presents a rarely heard side of Motorhead that itself is certain to entertain listeners.  This is just one of the compilation’s key elements and will be discussed later.  The acts whose songs are featured here are collectively just as important to discuss as the songs themselves and will be discussed later.  The album’s sequencing rounds out its most important elements.  Each element is important in its own right to this compilation’s overall presentation.  All things considered, Under Cover proves to be a record that is an entertaining new offering for Motorhead’s most devout fans.

Motorhead, with the passing of front man Lemmy Kilmister almost two years ago, may not be actively recording new music anymore.  With the release earlier this month of the band’s new covers compilation Under Cover, the band’s most devout fans were given an entertaining new release from Motorhead even if it is not a collection of new Motorhead music.  That statement is supported in part through the songs that make up the collection.  Considering that Motorhead, throughout the course of its life, was known for up-tempo blues-based rock that was tinged with some punk elements, the songs featured in this compilation show that the band was just as talented handling other styles of rock as its own brand.  That is proven clearly in the band’s cover of David Bowie’s hit song ‘Heroes,’ which comes early in the record’s run. Bowie’s original work bears more similarity to works from perhaps Paul McCartmey than Motorhead.  Yet, even in its slightly amped up take on the classic tune, Motorhead does Bowie’s classic justice while adding its own rock touch that is certain to get praise even from Bowie’s most devout fans.  The band’s take on The Rolling Stones’ ‘Jumpin’ Jack Flash’ is yet another song featured in this record that shows the real reach of the band’s abilities.  Once again, the band largely stays true to its source material, while also adding its own respectable hard rock elements.  The expert balance of those two elements here will put a smile on any longtime Rolling Stones fan just as much as any Motorhead fan.  Much the same can also be said in examining the band’s take of another Rolling Stones standard, ‘Sympathy For The Devil.’  Those three songs alone show clearly the band’s reach.  Of course that is not to discount the band’s covers of Ted Nugent’s ‘Cat Scratch Fever,’ Rainbow’s ‘Starstruck,’ and The Ramones’ ‘Rockaway Beach’ as well as the album’s other songs.  Those covers show in their own way the band’s reach, though they are much closer to Motorhead’s style than the previously noted works.  Keeping this in mind, the bands whose works are featured here are just as important to note as the songs themselves.

Listeners will note that of the album’s 11 total songs, seven were crafted by British acts—Judas Priest, The Sex Pistols, The Rolling Stones, David Bowie, Rainbow and Ozzy Osbourne.  The other four songs come from American acts—Ted Nugent, Metallica, Twisted Sister and The Ramones.  That in itself is certain to create its own share of discussion.  Obviously Motorhead was itself a British outfit, but it could easily be argued that such an emphasis on its counterparts presents its own history lesson to listeners.  It shows the reach of the British hard rock scene between the 1960s and 1990s versus that of the American hard rock scene.  To that end, the acts featured here in themselves serve as a starting point on rock’s history on both sides of the Atlantic.  That might not have been the manifest intent with such a lineup, but it definitely will create those discussions.  On another level, it shows the band’s interest in so many different parts of the rock community at the time. Judas Priest was hard rock while the Sex Pistols were more punk (again, showing Motorhead’s roots). Rainbow was more of a progressive style hard rock while The Rolling Stones were that blues-based influence that Motorhead always added to its own music, too.  In the same breath, Metallica’s Whiplash shows where Motorhead perhaps got its harder almost thrash elements.  When this is all taken into account along with the influences from the other featured bands, Motorhead’s roots become even more evident.  In other words, the bands and songs featured in this compilation form a solid foundation for the record.  They collectively serve as a starting point for discussions about music history and about Motorhead’s history.  Both by themselves and together, they do plenty to make this record enjoyable and are not the record’s only key elements.  The album’s sequencing adds its own enjoyment to its presentation.

Under Cover’s sequencing is an important to note in examining this record because of its ability to maintain the album’s energy from beginning to end.  The album starts out full throttle with the band’s cover of Judas Priest’s ‘Breakin’ The Law’ and keeps the energy flowing just as highly as it launches into its cover of The Sex Pistols’ ‘God Save The Queen.’  Even as the album progresses into the band’s cover of ‘Heroes,’ the energy still maintains itself even here.  Given, it isn’t as high as in the album’s first two entries, but still keeps moving.  The energy picks right back up as the album takes listeners through the band’s covers of Rainbow’s Starstruck’ and Ted Nugent’s ‘Cat Scratch Fever’ before pulling back again with two straight Rolling Stones covers.  From there on out, the energy picks right back and stays stable right to the album’s end even with the change in the songs’ styles.  Keeping this in mind, it is clear that plenty of time and thought was put into the record’s sequencing.  That time and thought ensures listeners’ engagement from beginning to end here.  That is because the record’s energy never lets up too much at any one point or even gets too high.  When this is taken into account along with the collective value of the record’s songs and their associated bands, it adds that much more depth to the collection.  That being the case, the whole of those elements make Under Cover a collection that will appeal not only to Motorhead’s fans from start to finish but to rock fans in general.

Motrhead’s recently released compilation record Under Cover is a collection of songs that will appeal both to Motorhead’s fans and to rock fans in general.  This is the case even though being a compilation record, it does not necessarily break any new ground in the way of compilation records.  The songs and bands featured on this record serve collectively as a solid starting point for plenty of discussions both on Motorhead’s history and on rock history.  They also do plenty to ensure listeners’ maintained engagement and entertainment.  The record’s sequencing does much the same.  All things considered, these elements make Under Cover a collection that while not exactly new to the compilation realm, is still entertaining in its own right.  It is available now in stores and online.  More information on Under Cover is available online now along with all of the latest Motorhead news at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.motorhead.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/OfficialMotorhead

Twitter: http://twitter.com/myMotorhead

 

 

 

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‘The Art Of The Possible’ Proves True Art Is Possible Even In Its Simplest Form

Courtesy: Limbo Music/Metamusic

Big things often can and do come in small packages.  Everyone has said or heard that adage (or some variant thereof) plenty of time throughout life.  It is an adage that means exactly what it states.  Something doesn’t have to be big to be “big.”  Musician/producer Fer Isella’s brand new full-length studio recording The Art of the Possible is proof positive that sometimes, big things truly can and do come in small packages.  Officially released in stores and online today, this Argentine’s nine-song album is an effort that is excellence in its simplest form as is evidenced in the songs themselves.  This will be discussed shortly.  The songs’ arrangements support that statement just as much as the songs themselves.  The record’s sequencing is a fine accent point to the album, too.  When it is considered along with the simplicity of the album’s songs and their arrangements, the whole of the album proves to be one of this year’s biggest and best surprises.

Fer Isella’s latest full-length studio recording The Art of the Possible is a work that shows great art is possible even when the smallest, simplest approach is taken in creating said art.  That is made clear in part through the nine songs presented in this pleasantly surprising new offering from the Argentine artist/producer.  The piano-driven songs presented here are fully instrumental works.  There are no vocals. There is no overdubbing.  There is nothing but Isella, a piano and a room.  Suffice it to say that this minimalist approach led to the creation of a group of heartfelt songs that will touch listeners more deeply than even the most saccharine sweet songs ever created both mainstream and otherwise.  This is proven clearly in the songs composed for Isella’s family—‘Dan,’ ‘Sof’ and ‘Cin’—just as much as in ‘Pendulum,’ ‘Conversation’ and the album’s other works.  Each song evokes a different emotion and tells a different story, with the end result being listeners’ ensured continued engagement.  Of course that engagement is only assured because of the time and thought put into the songs’ arrangements.

The arrangements that are presented throughout this record show great thought and consideration in each work.  The time and effort put into each arrangement creates a different musical tapestry in each work.  From perhaps two people walking and talking in an early fall mountain setting in the album’s opener ‘Conversation’ to someone perhaps sitting and wishing for that special someone alone in a park in ‘Desire’ to something far more frantic in ‘Pendulum,’ and plenty of other musical mattes, the pictures that Isella paints through his songs are certain to be different for every listener. These interpretations are only those of this critic. That aside, Isella’s clear ability to paint such vivid pictures through his simple arrangements (which at times feel like they could be used for some major big budget drama’s soundtrack) and evoke such deep emotion in the process shows once more the importance of the album’s arrangements.  It shows from start to finish that arrangements don’t have to be big productions in order to be themselves big.  Keeping this in mind, the show why the simplicity in the songs’ arrangements is just as important to this record’s success as the simplicity in Isella’s approach to the songs themselves.  Even with this in mind, the songs’ arrangements are collectively just one more way in which TAOTP impresses.  Its sequencing serves to make it impressive just as much as its arrangements and its songs.

The sequencing of TAOTP plays its own part in the album’s enjoyment because it shows, too, a certain amount of thought and consideration.  Over the course of the album’s first three songs, Isella keeps the album’s energy relatively gentle and smooth while still managing to evoke, again, so many different emotions through each work’s arrangement.  That energy audibly changes even more as he takes listeners through two of the album’s three songs that pay tribute to his family—‘Dan’ and ‘Sof.’  The energy exuded in ‘Dan’ is slightly higher than that of the album’s first three songs, yet is still controlled for lack of better wording.  In the same breath, ‘Sof’ is the polar opposite of ‘Dan.’ It somewhat continues the musical theme presented in ‘Dan,’ yet is so much more reserved than that song. It echoes the gentility exhibited in the album’s first three songs.  ‘Pendulum’ switches things up yet again with its energy of someone confused and almost frantic in his or her mindset about something.  That change of pace from the energies in the song’s predecessors is certain yet again to keep listeners engaged.  The record’s last three compositions—‘Cin,’ ‘Story’ and ‘Farewell’—pull the record’s energy back once more, depositing listeners gently on the same shore from whence they were lifted in the album’s opener, leaving them feeling wholly fulfilled.  That emotion, when considered with the other emotions generated throughout the rest of the album, reminds listeners once again of the time and thought obviously put into the album’s sequencing.  That effort, when considered along with the effort put into the album’s songs and their arrangements, creates an album that in whole is one of the year’s biggest musical surprises; a record that is in this critic’s view, one of the year’s best new album’s overall. It shows that true art is possible even with the simplest approach.  More information on The Art of the Possible is available online now at http://www.ferisella.com.

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‘Prophets Of Rage’ Is A Solid Effort For RATM 2.0

Courtesy: Fantasy Records

Rage Against The Machine is back again…sort of.  Tom Morello, Tim Cummerford and Brad Wilk joined forces with longtime friends B-Real (Cypress Hill) and Chuck D (Public Enemy) some time ago following the dissolution of Audioslave to form the super group Prophets of Rage, which is for all intents and purposes Rage Against The Machine 2.0.  The only real difference between this “new” group and RATM—as is clear in listening to the group’s brand new self-titled debut album, is the fact that Morello, Wilk and Cummerford are joined this time out by the aforementioned superstar hip-hop front men.  Musically and lyrically speaking, the fruits of the group’s efforts make this 12-song album everything that Rage Against The Machine fans have come to expect from that band.  Even with that in mind, that return to musical and lyrical form makes this record a welcome effort from the second coming of Rage Against The Machine.

Prophets of Rage’s brand new self-titled debut album is a welcome effort from what is for all intents and purposes the second coming of Rage Against The Machine.  That is due in part to the musical arrangements presented throughout the course of the album’s 12-song, 39-minute run time.  From start to finish, listeners get here 12 arrangements that are a full return to form for Morello and his RATM band mates—Brad Wilk (drums) and Brad Cummerford (bass).  Morello’s heavy riffs and guitar-based special sound effects lift from all three of RATM’s full-length studio efforts and even from the trio’s work under the Audioslave moniker.  That balance of sounds throughout this record makes it enjoyable enough even despite the arrangements not exactly being anything groundbreaking.  Keeping this in mind, the album’s collective arrangements are collectively just one of the album’s elements to examine.  Its lyrical content is just as important to note here as those arrangements.

The lyrical content presented throughout Prophets of Rage is important to note here because it is just as familiar to RATM fans as the album’s musical arrangements.  What is important to note here is that while being as socially conscious as the lyrics in RATM’s previous albums, the topics tackled here are timely.  They do not just rehash the topics taken on in those records.  Case in point is the album’s opener ‘Radical Eyes.’  This song clearly takes on the misconception that just because someone might read one religious book or another that said person has become radicalized.  It is a response, basically, to the close mindedness that so many people have primarily against the Muslim community in this nation.  Its follow-up, ‘Unf*** the World’ stays on a similar mindset as it takes on the issue of racism that is still so alive in America.  The group also takes on the issue of poverty in America and the struggle to fight the issue due to politicians who seemingly don’t care to fight that battle in ‘Living on the 110.’  The group even takes on the issue of personal privacy invasion of sorts in ‘Take Me Higher,’ which addresses law enforcement’s use (and possible misuse) of drones in their daily duties.  The group even goes so far as to address the tensions between police and the people that have risen in recent years over allegations of police brutality in ‘Hands Up.’  This is all just a glance at the way in which Prophets of Rage manages lyrically to impress listeners with its timely lyrical content.  The other songs not noted here all present lyrical content that is just as timely as the material noted here.  Keeping all of this in mind, the lyrical content presented throughout this record proves to be POR’s cornerstone.  It is just one more of the album’s most important elements, too.  The album’s sequencing puts the final touch to its overall presentation.

Plenty of time and thought was obviously put into Prophets of Rage’s sequencing.  From start to finish, the album never lets its fire burn out.  Even as the group gets a bit funky in ‘Take Me Higher,’ it still doesn’t let up in its energy.  The up-tempo arrangement is instantly infectious thanks to all involved, ensuring listeners’ engagement just as much as the album’s much heavier arrangements.  Much the same can be said of ‘Counteroffensive,’ the 38-second interlude which lifts more from Public Enemy and Cypress Hill than RATM.  Even as short as it is and stylistically separate from its counterparts, its arrangement still is entertaining.  Its placement almost halfway through the record is just as smart, as it gives listeners a short break and some variance to the record in whole.  Considering this, the energies exhibited in each song and the fact that no one song directly repeats the other (in regards to their arrangements), it becomes even clearer why the album’s sequencing is so important to the album’s whole.  The energies never vary even as the familiar arrangements do vary.  When this is considered along with the arrangements themselves and the album’s timely lyrical content, the end result is an album that proves to be a solid first effort from Prophets of Rage and an equally solid new effort from what is for all intents and purposes Rage Against The Machine 2.0.  More information on Prophets of Rage is available now along with Prophets of Rage’s latest news and more at:

 

 

 

Website: http://prophetsofrage.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/prophetsofrageofficial

Twitter: http://twitter.com/prophetsofrage

 

 

 

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Arrow Academy’s ‘Terror In A Texas Town’ Re-Issue Is Anything But A Terror

Courtesy: Arrow Academy/United Artists

Late this past July, independent movie company Arrow Academy re-issued the little-known classic Western flick Terror in a Texas Town on Blu-ray.  While perhaps not the most well-known offering from the “Western World,” it is in fact a movie that Western fans and cinephiles alike will appreciate.  That statement applies regardless of audiences’ familiarity with the movie.  This is due in part to the movie’s central story, which will be discussed shortly.  The work of the movie’s cast plays its own part in the movie’s enjoyability and will be discussed later.  The bonus material included in the movie’s recent re-issue rounds out its most important elements.  Each element is important in its own right to the re-issue’s overall presentation.  All things considered, they make Arrow Academy’s re-issue of Terror in a Texas Town anything but a terror.

Arrow Academy’s recent re-issue of United Artists’ 1958 Western Terror in a Texas Town is a work that is anything but a terror.  Yes, that awful pun was fully intended.  That statement is supported in part through the movie’s story.  Written by Dalton Trumbo, the movie’s story follows a relatively familiar plot yet does so with a few alterations to that all too familiar plot.  Trumbo’s story follows protagonist George Hansen (Sterling Hayden—The Godfather, Dr. Strangelove, The Asphalt Jungle) as he sets out to avenge his father’s death.  In the way of that vengeance is the standard evil businessman/landowner McNeill (Sebastian Cabot—The Many Adventures of Winnie The Pooh, The Jungle Book, The Sword in the Stone) and his henchman, Johnny Crale (Nedrick Young—Inherit The Wind, The Defiant Ones, Jailhouse Rock).  One of the most notable variations incorporated into this story is that Hansen comes in not as the incoming Sheriff who typically fights the bad guys, but a man from another land.  This element is discussed more in-depth in the bonus material and will be touched on later.  In other words, this story isn’t the standard man in white versus the man in black story.  It is just a man who wants justice and (not to give away too much here) gets it without going around the town shooting all the bad guys.  That in itself is another variant that can’t be ignored here.  Along with those variants, audiences will also notice that the underlying romance subplot that is all too common in so many other is absent from this story, too.  Its absence here makes the story all the more engaging for audiences, proving even more that a good story doesn’t necessarily need all of the clichés of a genre to be enjoyable.  The fact that Trumbo left so many Western clichés out of this story, opting instead for something more directed and focused also played positively into the movie’s roughly 80-minute run time, ensuring even more audiences’ maintained engagement.  What’s more, the lack of those clichés also is obviously what led to the movie’s 80-minute run time.  If all those unnecessary items had been added to the story, it likely would have been far longer in terms of its run time and even less well-known.  Keeping all of this in mind, it becomes clear why the story at the center of Terror in a Texas Town is such an important part of the movie’s whole.  It also becomes clear why the story is so entertaining and engaging from start to finish.  With this in mind, the movie’s story is only one of its most important elements.  The work of the movie’s cast is just as important to discuss as its story.

The work of the cast in Terror in a Texas Town is so critical to the movie’s overall presentation because the cast’s work is just as simple as the story.  This is not a bad thing, either.  From Hayden’s confidence as George Hansen to Cabot’s diabolical McNeill and even to Young’s work as Johnny Crale, and beyond, every cast member here does just enough to make their characters believable.  Audiences will be especially moved by the subtlety in Young’s portrayal of Crale as Crale clearly is struggling internally with who he is and was.  The way that Young handle’s Crale, there almost seems to be a hint that Crale doesn’t like being a hired gun anymore and has second thoughts about what he is doing despite convincing himself in the end of his place.  Even in the case of Cabot and Hayden, their performances are spot on.  Cabot, even in his few on-screen appearances still manages to make audiences know McNeill is the evil businessman without going over the top in doing so.  Hayden echoes hints of Gary Cooper (which is also discussed in the re-issue’s bonus material) in his simplistic approach.  Between all of this and the work of the rest of the movie’s cast, so much can be such of the cast’s work, all of it positive.  Audiences will see that for themselves when they check out this movie for themselves.  Keeping this in mind, it becomes clear why the work of this movie’s cast is just as important to its presentation as the movie’s story.  It still is not the last of the movie’s most important elements.  The bonus material included in its recent re-issue rounds out its most important elements.

The bonus material featured in Arrow Academy’s recent re-issue of Terror in a Texas Town includes an in-depth introduction to the movie and an analysis of its cinematography from author Peter Stanfield.  Stanfield, known best for his book Hollywood, Westerns and the 1930s—The Lost Trail and Horse Opera: The Strange History of the Singing Cowboy, explains what makes Terror in a Texas Town so many other Westerns and what also sets it apart from those flicks.  Audiences learn through Stanfield’s discussions that while Trumbo’s story was, on its outermost level a Western, it was on a deeper level, an allegory about personal freedoms.  This is key as he connects it to the impact of Joseph McCarthy’s witch hunt on Trumbo, Hayden and even Young.  This discussion alone adds so much more depth to the movie’s overall presentation.  Stanfield’s discussion on Trumbo’s balance of classic Western elements with his own writing style here adds yet more depth to the movie’s presentation as does his discussion on director Joseph H. Lewis’ stylistic approach to the movie behind the lens.  This is a discussion that any film production student and lover will appreciate.  When these and other discussions included in the re-issue’s bonus material is considered in whole, they prove collectively to be just as critical to the movie’s presentation as the movie’s story and the work of its actors.  Collectively, those bonus discussions, the movie’s story and the cast’s work show Terror in a Texas Town to be a work that Western fans and movie history buffs alike will appreciate.  That is even despite the movie being one of the lesser-known entries in the “Western world.”  It is available now in stores and online.  More information on this and other titles from Arrow Academy is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://arrowfilms.co.uk

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ArrowAcademy

 

 

 

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‘Take A Good Look The Definitive Collection’ Is A Must See For Any Student, Lover Of The Broadcast Arts, History

Courtesy: Shout! Factory/ABC

ABC’s classic panel game show Take A Good Look is one of the most important yet underappreciated programs in broadcasting history.  Shout! Factory will prove that this fall when it releases the program’s most comprehensive collection to date in the form of Take A Good Look: The Definitive Collection in stores and online.  The seven-disc collection presents 49 episodes from the short-lived late-night series.  The episodes presented here are collectively the set’s most important element, and for multiple reasons, too.  They will be discussed shortly.  The liner notes included with the set are just as important to the set’s presentation as its episodes and will be discussed later.  The set’s packaging rounds out its most important elements.  Each element is clearly important in its own right to the set’s overall presentation.  All things considered, Take A Good Look: The Definitive Collection proves in the end to be an important watch for any lover and student of broadcast history.

Shout! Factory’s forthcoming Take A Good Look: The Definitive Collection is an important collection for any lover and student of broadcast history to own.  It brings to light a program that is one of the industry’s most important yet underappreciated game shows as is evidenced through its episodes.  While the series ran for a total of 53 episodes over two seasons on ABC, only 49 of those episodes have ever been available, and Shout! Factory has made all 49 of those episodes available here, giving audiences here the fullest run of the show possible.  This is only one part of what makes the episodes so critical.  The show’s very format presented in these episodes is important to discuss, too.  That is because of the influence that it clearly has played on so many series since.  One part late night talk show and one part light-hearted panel show, one can easily see (and hear) the series’ influence on the likes of Whose Line Is It Anyway, National Public Radio’s Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me and even so many of today’s late night talk shows.  Even CBS’ classic Saturday morning cartoon series Garfield & Friends paid tribute to Take A Good Look in one of its U.S. Acres shorts.

On yet another level, the episodes featured here are important to note because of their historical and cultural importance.  Audiences will see here that along with the fun games, the episodes also feature the original Dutch Masters cigar ads that ran with the show in its original run.  It reminds audiences on one level of a time when tobacco companies were allowed to advertise on a wider scale than they can today.  On another level, the ads will surprise audiences in the fact that they apparently even targeted children.  One of the ads encouraged children to buy Dutch Masters cigar boxes for their fathers as Father’s Day gifts.  That in itself is certain to generate plenty of discussion as will some of the other ads featured here.

While the ads included with the set’s featured episodes add their own depth to the episodes’ presentation, they are not the last important part of what makes the episodes so important.  The episodes’ production values are just as important to note as the ads and the episodes’ content.  The production values (its audio and video) make watching the episodes like opening a virtual time capsule of sorts.  That is because audiences get here, the episodes’ original audio and video playback.  In other words, no effort was taken to re-master the episodes in regards to the audio or video.  In this case, this is a great thing.  That is because it shows how far television production technology has come since television’s golden age.  In turn, it shows how much production values have improved as a result of those technological advances.  Considering this element, the ads that run with the episodes, the show’s clear influence as a result of its format and the full episode listing, it becomes clear why the episodes featured here are so important to the overall presentation of Take A Good Look: The Definitive Collection.  The whole of those aspects leads the episodes collectively to form a solid foundation for the set; a foundation on which is strengthened even more through the bonus liner notes included with the set.

The liner notes included with this collection, composed by film & TV historian Ben Model, enhance the set’s presentation even more because of the depth of information provided therein.  Audiences learn through Model’s notes that apparently host Ernie Kovacs, who was known largely for other film and television work, that he apparently was not fond of Take A Good Look.  Just as interesting to learn is why exactly Kovacs even agreed to host the show and the possible reason that the show even managed two seasons.  These tidbits and so much more paint a vivid picture for the series even before audiences put in the first disc.  Keeping this in mind, it becomes clear why the set’s bonus liner notes prove to be just as important to this set’s presentation as its episodes.  The liner notes are not the last of the set’s most important elements either.  Its packaging rounds out its most important elements.

The packaging used for this set is everything that audiences have come to expect from Shout! Factory in regards to its box sets.  Each of the set’s six discs is placed on its own plate inside the set’s box, protecting the discs from each other and also minimizing the box’s size as much as possible.  The set’s episode listing is printed clearly on the inside of the box’s art, too and includes the episodes’ air date, guest name and the episodes’ specific discs.  That listing once again provides a clear guide for audiences as they select the episodes that they want to watch, proving once more why this set deserves such high praise.  When this is considered along with the set’s in-depth liner notes and just as deep episodes, it becomes perfectly clear why this set in whole is such an important collection for any lover and student of television history.  What’s more, it becomes just as clear why Take A Good Look is itself such an important part of not just television history but broadcast history in whole.  Keeping all of this in mind, one can’t help but agree that this set deserves a spot on any critic’s list of the year’s top new DVD/BD box sets for grown ups.

Shout! Factory’s upcoming release of Take A Good Look: The Definitive Collection is a must see for any lover and student of the broadcast arts and their associated history.  That is due to episodes that show their own depth and value along with liner notes and production values that are just as critical as the set’s episodes.  Keeping all of that in mind, the set in whole proves that it deserves a spot on any critic’s list of the year’s top new DVD/BD box sets for grown-ups.  It will be released in stores and online Oct. 17 and can be pre-ordered online now via Shout! Factory’s online store.  More information on this and other titles from Shout! Factory is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.shoutfactory.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/shoutfactoryofficial

Twitter: http://twitter.com/ShoutFactory

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Shout! Factory, NBC Partner To Release ‘The Good Place: Season 1’

Courtesy: NBC/Shout! Factory

Shout! Factory is taking audiences to a “Good Place” this fall.

Shout! Factory will release the first season of NBC’s hit sitcom The Good Place in stores and online on Oct. 17.  The series follows protagonist Eleanor Shellstrop  (Kristen Bell-Bad Moms, Veronica Mars, Frozen) as she navigates her unexpected afterlife following a clerical error  landed her upstairs instead of downstairs.

Bell is joined in Season One by veteran actor Ted Danson (Cheers¸ Becker, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation) and by William Jackson Harper (The Electric Company, True Story, All Good Things) among others in this surprise hit comedy’s debut season.

Along with 13 full-length episodes, the series’ lead season also comes with a handful of bonuses including a pair of audio commentaries, a gag reel, table read and more.  The Good Place: Season 1 can be pre-ordered online now via Shout! Factory’s online store.  More information on this and other titles from Shout! Factory is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.shoutfactory.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/shoutfactoryofficial

Twitter: http://twitter.com/ShoutFactory

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.