eOne’s WWI Mini-Series Is A Must See For History Buffs Of All Kinds

Courtesy:  Entertainment One/American Heroes Channel

Courtesy: Entertainment One/American Heroes Channel

World War II, Korea, and Vietnam are the most talked about conflicts in military history.  The trio has been fodder for more movies and television specials than can be counted on two hands alone.  They aren’t the only conflicts that have shaped the history of world, though.  As many stories have come from these conflicts, there is one conflict in particular that has never fully received the attention that it deserves.  The conflict in question is the First World War.  Much like World War II, WWI started in Europe.  But it started for a much different reason than did World War II as audiences will learn in watching this in depth-reissue of the Military Channel mini-series.  The information shared throughout the program’s eight-plus hours is just a single part of what makes this re-issued mini-series well worth the watch.  The accompanying vintage footage of pre-wartime Europe and Europe during the war is another positive to the presentation as a whole.  Last but most definitely not least, the entire program is singularly narrated.  The people behind the documentary didn’t rely on celebrity “experts” to help move the program along. That final factor makes this three-disc set one more that both history buffs and military history buffs will appreciate.

The First World War is an important presentation both for history buffs in general and more specifically for any military history buff. That is because of the amount and depth of information shared throughout the course of its eight-plus hours. It doesn’t just breeze over the war’s history with a few handfuls of highlights. Rather it traces the history of the war going beyond the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria that is said to have started the war. It goes all the way back to racial and political tensions between the various groups of the area that would eventually lead to said assassination. Audiences learn how the British actually used the Japanese to take over certain regions of China and so many other facts that aren’t taught in public schools or even in college level courses. That explains why the entire mini-series runs just over eight hours across three-discs. And it’s just the tip of the proverbial iceberg that makes this set worth the watch.

The in-depth content that makes up The First World War is a solid foundation to the mini-series in whole. It presents to audiences far more information than could be presented over the course of an academic year in public schools.   It presents even more than could be presented over the course of a semester in a college level course, too. Audiences will also appreciate the use of the vintage pictures and footage incorporated into the mini-series, too. Footage from the days of World War II is far more plentiful (or so it would seem) than from the days of World War I. It makes the footage presented here all the more valuable and important in understanding what was going on in the world in the days and months leading up to the start of World War I and even during the war itself. And along with the diary readings offered throughout the program, It makes the presentation as a whole even more interesting for any history buff in general and military history buff. That leads to one more point of equal importance in this mini-series. The point in question is the lack of “expert” and celebrity guests to discuss the events of the war.

Most specials, series, and mini-series centered on the world’s various important historical events that air on television are accompanied by “expert” and celebrity guests. The “expert” guests all have their share of valuable information. But the inclusion of celebrity guests to narrate, do readings and otherwise just make appearances is little more than a marketing ploy used to get eyeballs. And being that this mini-series originally aired on the American Heroes Channel (formerly Military Channel), it’s rather interesting to note that those behind this program didn’t employ such a marketing ploy. It’s interesting because programs run on other Discovery Communications networks do in fact use that angle. It’s nice to sit back and watch this program without some celebrity or alleged “expert” adding his or her own two cents every few minutes or so. It’s just one narrator, vintage footage, and a straight, pure history of a war that deserves far more coverage than it has ever received from any network or filmmaker. It collectively makes The First World War a must see for anyone that has any interest at all in history in general and in military history.

The First World War is available now. It can be ordered now online via Amazon at http://www.amazon.com/First-World-War-Woodrow-Wilson/dp/B00IS6WPT2/ref=sr_1_1?s=movies-tv&ie=UTF8&qid=1401566849&sr=1-1&keywords=The+First+World+War. More information on this and other programs from American Heroes Channel is available at http://www.ahctv.com. To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.