Ozomatli Debuts More New Music From Its Forthcoming Album

Courtesy: Blue Elan Records

Ozomatli is going the reggae route with the latest single from its forthcoming album, Marching On.

The band premiered its new single, ‘Sunsets‘ Friday. The song is the fourth single from the band’s forthcoming record, which is scheduled for release July 15 through Blue Elan Records. Its release follows those of the record’s other singles, ‘Sacude,’ ‘Mi Destino,’ and ‘Fellas’.

As noted, the musical arrangement featured in ‘Sunsets’ is a light, reggae-tinged composition. It is completely unlike the arrangements featured in the record’s current singles in that nature. It will appeal easily to fans of Sublime, Jack Johnson, and The Dirty Heads.

Front man Raul Pacheco talked about the song’s positive lyrical message in a prepared statement.

“’Sunsets’ is about the city of LA, traveling from the east side to the beach and all of those special moments in between,” Pacheco said. “We wish they could last forever but even beautiful sunsets have to end sometime. The inspiration came from the ending of beautiful things, sometimes it’s relationships, sometimes it’s important parts of your life. When you’re looking at a sunset, it’s just for a moment – you really have just a few minutes to capture this image because then it’s gone. For me, there’s something about that – about life, about how we live, there are beautiful things everywhere but they might not be permanent and you might as well enjoy it while you can.”

In other news, Ozomatli is scheduled to launch a tour in support of its new album May 15 in Redondo Beach, CA. The tour is scheduled to run through Sept. 18 in Long Beach, CA and includes stops in Pelham, TN; Taos, NM and Fort Collins, CO.

The tour’s schedule is noted below.

Ozomatli on tour
5/15/22 – Redondo Beach, CA – BeachLife Festival
5/16/22 – Los Angeles, CA – The Venice West (BeachLife afterparty)
5/22/22 – Los Angeles, CA – Getty 25 Celebrates Lincoln Heights/East L.A.
5/29/22 – Taos, New Mexico – Kit Carson Park
5/30/22 – Pelham, TN – Dia de Los Muertos in the Caverns (A PBS Television Event – with Los Lobos)
6/17/22 – Menlo Park, CA – The Guild Theatre
6/18/22 – Mammoth Lakes, CA – The Village at Mammoth
6/19/22 – Ukiah, CA – Todd Grove Park (Sundays in the Park)
6/23/22 – Fullerton, CA – Craig Regional Park (OC Parks Summer Concert Series)
7/16/22 – Ventura , CA – Ventura Pier (Surf Rodeo)
7/28/22 – Ridgway, CO – Hartwell Park
7/29/22 – Fort Collins, CO – Washington’s
7/31/22 – Carbondale, CO – Sopris Park (Carbondale Mountain Fair)
9/02/22 – Silverthorne, CO – Rainbow Park
9/15/22 – Long Beach, CA – The Old School Cruise
9/16/22 – Long Beach, CA – The Old School Cruise
9/17/22 – Long Beach, CA – The Old School Cruise
9/18/22 – Long Beach, CA – The Old School Cruise

More information on Ozomatli’s new album and tour is available along with all of the group’s latest news at:

Websitehttps://ozomatli.com

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/ozomatli

Twitterhttps://twitter.com/ozomatli

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Ozomatli Debuts New LP’s Third Single

Courtesy: Blue Elan Records

Ozomatli is scheduled to release its latest album this summer, and in anticipation, released the album’s latest single this week.

The band is scheduled to release its new album, Marching On July 15 through Blue Elan Records. In anticipation of the record’s release, the band premiered its latest single, ‘Sacude’ Thursday through radio station KCRW in Los Angeles, California.

The song’s musical arrangement is everything that audiences have come to expect from the veteran collective, complete with all of the Afro-Latin percussion and familiar Cuban style piano licks and vocal styles. There is even a touch of a hip-hop vibe about the arrangement, too, that is so subtle, but still evident in a close listen. That, too, is familiar for longtime fans. The whole is a composition that will appeal to a wide range of audiences.

Front man Asdru Sierra said the song’s lyrical theme is meant to deliver a positive message to listeners.

“’Sacude’ is a song about shaking off toxicity,” he said. “Poetically it describes how the guy in the band that plays maracas has something strange in his instrument that rattles funny and throws off his groove.  The maracas are like an extension of our souls in this case. At first a guy in the band that’s his friend tells him there’s something off with him. He points out that he is sick with toxicity and he’s worried. But he needs to deal with it.  Then during the chorus, the pregones are the maraca player expelling his toxicity.”

Sierra continued, “We all have toxicity in our lives, whether it’s from other people or our own addictions or insecurities, everyone has experienced toxicity. So, we all aim to clean out our maracas to get rid of whatever makes it sound bad to continue grooving.”

Ozomatli debuted two other singles from the album in 2021. One of those singles was ‘Mi Destino, which features guest appearances by Cypress Hill/Prophets of Rage’s B-Real and vocalist Gaby Moreno. The other single produced from the album is ‘Fellas,’ which features a guest appearance by Lisa Lisa (Cult Jam) and the ladies of J.J. Fad.

More information on Ozomatli’s new album is available along with all of the group’s latest news at:

Website: https://ozomatli.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ozomatli

Twitter: https://twitter.com/ozomatli

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Soul Asylum’s New EP Is An Enjoyable Companion Piece To ‘Hurry Up And Wait’

Courtesy: Blue Elan Records

When veteran rock band Soul Asylum released its new album Hurry Up and Wait in April, the record was the band’s first new album in four years.  It was a record that proved worth the wait, too.  Now ironically thanks to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, audiences are not having to wait nearly as long for its follow-up.  The band released its new EP Born Free Friday, less than six months after Hurry Up and Wait’s release.  The four-song record is an interesting presentation in large part because of its musical arrangements.  This aspect will be discussed shortly.  The record’s production is just as important to note as its arrangements and will be addressed a little later.  The EP’s sequencing rounds out its most important elements and will also be discussed later.  Each item noted is important in its own way to the whole of the record.  All things considered, they make the EP another positive offering from Soul Asylum that audiences will be glad they did not have to wait such a long time to receive.

Soul Asylum’s new EP Born Free is a pleasant follow-up to the band’s latest album, Hurry Up and Wait.  It is a record for which audiences will be glad came sooner than the noted album.  That is due in part to its musical arrangements.  The arrangements in question are acoustic takes of four songs featured in Hurry Up and Wait – ‘If I Told You,’ ‘The Beginning,’ ‘Here We Go,’ and ‘Got It Pretty Good.’  The musical arrangement featured in the acoustic take of ‘Got It Pretty Good’ stays true to its source material.  Obviously being acoustic, it doesn’t have all of the production that was used in the original song, such as the choral effect used in the choruses or the bombast of the drums and bass.  The distortion isn’t there and the guitar solo in the bridge is more simplistic, yet still so infectious in its own right.  The whole of the arrangement may not be as intense as its source material, but still is fully engaging and entertaining in its own right.  It is just one of the EP’s most notable arrangements.  The arrangement featured in the acoustic take of ‘If I Told You’ is notable in its own right.

The musical arrangement featured in the acoustic take of ‘If I Told You’ is so important to examine because in this case, it is so starkly different from its source material.  Whereas the arrangement featured in the original composition is a moving, emotional work in its own right, with all of its clean production, the song’s acoustic arrangement deepens that emotional impact even more.  That is because the acoustic take is so simplistic in its approach.  Instead of the full compliment of electric guitars, drums, and bass, this song is just front man Dave Pirner (and possibly band mate guitarist Ryan Smith) and a pair of guitars.  The harmonies in the vocals and the simplicity in the instrumentation reaches a new place in every listener’s heart and ears.  It is proof that every now and then, a song’s acoustic take actually can and does improve over its source material because it is so simple in its approach and sound.  It’s just one more way in which the EP’s musical content proves so important to its presentation.  The arrangement featured in ‘The Beginning’ is another way in which the EP’s musical content proves its importance.

The acoustic take of ‘The Beginning’ is a lighter take on the original work, which is itself an instantly radio-ready work that lends itself to comparisons to some of Foo Fighters’ early works.  To another extent, one could even argue comparisons to early works from Smashing Pumpkins, believe it or not.  That is proven through its guitar-driven, mid-tempo presentation.  By comparison, the noted acoustic take does have its own energy, even in its far more simplistic approach.  What is interesting is the unique impact that it will have on listeners because of that noted instrumentation.  The emotion that is exhibited in the acoustic take’s instrumentation is excited, given, but is also more tentative than that of the song’s full take.  It is just one more way in which the EP’s musical arrangements prove their value.  What’s more, it adds even more to the discussion on the impact of acoustic takes of songs versus their full counterparts.  Taking into consideration that impact featured here, in the other noted songs and the EP’s one other work, ‘Here We Go,’ no doubt is left as to the importance of the record’s musical content.  It collectively is just part of what makes Born Free stand out, too.  The record’s production builds on the foundation formed by the arrangements and enriches the record’s presentation even more.

Born Free’s production is just as important to examine as its arrangements because it is that work that brought out all of the record’s nuances.  Since ‘Here We Go’ was not addressed in the arrangements’ examination, it will serve as the starting point here.  The vocal layering that was used alongside the dynamics in the instrumentation is an example of the positive result of the production.  That layering balances the vocals of Priner (and apparently Smith) expertly.  The dynamic changes that are used throughout the song are so subtle, and captured just as expertly behind the glass, and are just noticeable enough.  Considering that the arrangement here is so much more reserved than its source material, that attention to detail here is key in its own way.  This is just one way in which the EP’s production proves important.  That of ‘If I Told You’ does its own share to show the importance of the record’s production.

The production of ‘If I Told You’ shines again through the balance in the vocals.  At the same time, the balance of what sounds like that of the guitar and bass against the vocals adds even more emotional impact to the song.  All things considered here, the dynamics are made so clear, and the emotional impact is just as strong as at any other point in the record.  It’s yet another way in which the record’s production proves so pivotal to its whole.  Simply put, everything is clear and balanced, and well arranged.

Much the same can be said of ‘Got It Pretty Good’ and ‘The Beginning’ as has already been noted of ‘Here We Go’ and ‘If I Told You.’  It would be redundant to repeat everything already noted.  To that end, the production plays into the EP’s overall impact just as much as the arrangements.  It succeeds just as much, too.  Keeping that in mind, the production and arrangements go a long way to make the record an overall success, and are still not the last of the its most important items.  Its sequencing rounds out its most important items.

The sequencing of Born Free is important to examine because it brings everything full circle.  As has already been noted, the arrangements have their own unique impact on listeners.  The production is to thank in its own right for helping to make the arrangements sound so impressive.  For all that they do, the sequencing of any record plays its own part in any record’s general effect.  The EP starts off subtly with ‘If I Told You.’  That subtle, reserved sense continues on through into ‘The Beginning.’  However, it does hint at a slight increase in the record’s energy.  ‘Here We Go’ maintains the record’s reserved nature before the EP goes out on a high note in ‘Got It Pretty Good.’  Simply put, the EP spends most of its time keeping listeners in a controlled mindset and ultimately rewards listeners in its finale with the noted upbeat ‘Got It Pretty Good.’  Keeping that in mind, it leaves listeners feeling good as it subtly builds over the course of its 14-minute run time.  To that end, the sequencing joins with the arrangements and their production to ultimately put the finishing touch to the presentation and prove one last time what makes the EP so enjoyable for audiences. 

Soul Asylum’s new EP Born Free is a work that the band’s most devoted fans will appreciate.  That is proven in part through its arrangements.  They give new identities to the songs, whose source material was released in the band’s latest album back in April.  The arrangements’ production adds its own impact to the record as it is that work that brings out the best in each arrangement.  The record’s sequencing rounds out its most important elements, as it plays into the record’s general effect by impacting listeners’ moods.  All three noted elements are key in their own way to the EP.  All things considered, they make the record a work that continues to prove Soul Asylum still very much has a place in the rock community today.  The EP is available now.

More information on Soul Asylum’s new album, tour and more is available online now along with all of the band’s latest news and more at:

Websitehttp://www.soulasylum.com

Facebookhttp://www.facebook.com/SoulAsylum

Twitterhttp://twitter.com/soulasylum

To keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Soul Asylum Announces Livestream Details

Courtesy: Blue Elan Records

Soul Asylum will hold a new livestream performance next month.

The band made the announcement Friday.  The concert, dubbed “Hurry Up and Wait: Some More,” is scheduled to take place at 10 p.m. ET on Oct. 10 at Creation Studios in Minneapolis, MN through the band’s official website.  Local H will provide support for the ticketed event.

The band’s upcoming livestream is in support of its most recent studio recording Hurry Up and Wait and its forthcoming EP Born Free.  Born Free is scheduled for release Oct. 16 through Blue Elan Records.

More information on Soul Asylum’s new livestream concert is available online now along with all of the band’s latest news and more at:

 

 

 

Websitehttp://www.soulasylum.com

Facebookhttp://www.facebook.com/SoulAsylum

Twitterhttp://twitter.com/soulasylum

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Soul Asylum Announces Release Date, Cover Art For New EP

Courtesy: Blue Elan Records

Soul Asylum will release its next record this fall.

The band is scheduled to release its new digital EP Born Free Oct. 16 through Blue Elan Records.  The record featured acoustic re-imaginings of songs from the band’s latest album Hurry Up and Wait.  The album was released April 17 through Blue Elan Records.

The songs featured in the forthcoming recording were produced shortly after the release of Hurry Up and Wait while front man Dave Pirner and his band mates were forced to stay indoors due to the “safer at home” orders passed nationwide.  Pirner and Soul Asylum guitarist Ryan Smith’s streaming quarantine sessions, which took place live from Pirner’s living room, were what led to the creation of the acoustic takes.

One of the acoustic takes featured in the forthcoming EP, ‘If I Told You‘ is streaming now.

Pirner talked about the creative process in a recent interview.

“After I get the main idea for the song and have roughly figured out how to play it I show it to Ryan and then we play it together,” he said. “So, in a way, this is kind of showing how the songs were before we added the rhythm section. It’s fun to cut live in the studio; there’s no going back and you can’t fix it. It’s unembellished, therefore hopefully interesting.”

In other news, Pirner and Smith are scheduled to perform live at 9 p.m. ET tonight on American Songwriter’s Instagram.  Additionally, the band will take part in this year’s rescheduled Record Store Day, which is scheduled to take place Oct. 24.

The band will re-issue Hurry Up And Wait on a 2LP vinyl set with bonus 7-inch vinyl that features two previously unreleased songs — a cover of the timeless country song ‘Rhinestone Cowboy’ and an acoustic take of the band’s hit song ‘We 3.’  That song originally appeared on the band’s 1990 album And The Horse They Rode In On, and then later on the soundtrack for the 1997 movie Chasing Amy.

More information on Soul Asylum’s new album, tour and more is available online now along with all of the band’s latest news and more at:

 

 

 

Websitehttp://www.soulasylum.com

Facebookhttp://www.facebook.com/SoulAsylum

Twitterhttp://twitter.com/soulasylum

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Audiences Will Agree Soul Asylum’s New LP Was Worth The “Wait”

Courtesy: Blue Elan Records

Soul Asylum is proof that a band doesn’t have to be a superstar act in order to be successful.  The Minneapolis, Minnesota-based indie rock act has, for more than three decades, sold thousands of records worldwide, built a fan base just as large, if not larger, and even seen two of its albums go platinum.  For all of that success, the band has remained largely just under the mainstream radar.  Now this spring, the little band that could will continue its success when it releases its new album Hurry Up And Wait.  Set for release April 17 through Blue Elan Records, the 13-song record will come more than four years after the band released its most recent album, 2016’s Change of Fortune.  The band’s 12th album, the 46-minute record proves to be a work that fans will agree was worth the “wait.”  That is proven through the album’s musical and lyrical content, as is proven in part through the album’s opener, ‘The Beginning.’  It will be addressed shortly.  ‘Got it Pretty Good,’ which also comes early in the album’s run, is another way in which the record’s overall content makes the album work.  It will be addressed a little later.  ‘Silly Things,’ the album’s closer is one more way in which the album’s collective musical and lyrical content comes together to show why the album is an interesting new offering from Soul Asylum’s latest lineup.  When these songs are considered along with other entries featured in the album, such as ‘Social Butterfly,’ ‘Freezer Burn’ and the album’s lead single ‘If I Told You’ and the rest of the album’s offerings, the whole of this record makes it another work that Soul Asylum’s longtime fans will assuredly enjoy

Longtime fans of Soul Aslyum and indie rock fans alike will all agree that it was a good thing Dave Pirner – one of the band’s founding members – and his latest lineup of musicians did not “hurry” to make the band’s 12th full-length studio recording.  Coming more than four years after the release of its 11th album Change of Fortune, this latest album from the indie-rock darling gives listeners plenty to appreciate both musically and lyrically.  The album’s opener, fittingly titled ‘The Beginning,’ is just one of the songs that serves to support these statements.  The song’s guitar-driven, mid-tempo arrangement is an instantly radio-ready work that lends itself to comparisons to some of Foo Fighters’ early works.  To another extent, one could even argue comparisons to early works from Smashing Pumpkins, believe it or not.  Between the guitar and bass line, which form the song’s foundation and the time keeping, which builds even more on that foundation, the whole of the arrangement gives the album a solid start.  The music’s companion lyrical content shows even more, what makes the song such a strong start to the record, and notable entry to the album.

The lyrical content at the center of ‘The Beginning’ is a very positive presentation that any listener will appreciate.  Pirner sings in the song’s lead verse, “Everyone’s waiting/To see if you’re coming/Out of your shell for a while/Cupid and Casper are asking about you/You used to be so wild/I know how it is/You’d be drunk at a party/It seems there’s someone you should call/Then the cycle begins/You decide to stay in/You don’t talk to anyone at all/Never know what you might find/You never know what you leave behind/This is the beginning/Of a great adventure/No’s not the time, not the time to step aside.”  He continues in the song’s second verse, “I’ve had my share of missteps and delusions…Every conclusion/Is better than never/Happily after all/Dig yourself out of the tangled up barbed-wire/Fighting over every wall/Then you get over/And pull yourself/Pull yourself up by the straps of your overalls/Never know what you might find/You never know what you leave behind/This is the beginning of a great adventure/Leaving with you/This is the beginning/Of a great adventure/Now’s not the time, not the time/To leave it behind/I’m right behind you/Behind you all the way/When I find you/We’ll be on our way.” Pirner leaves little doubt as to the central theme of this song with these relatively accessible lyrics.  The whole thing comes across as a song that encourages listeners to move forward in life and put the past behind them, thus the phrasing in the song’s chorus about the great adventure and it not being the time to step aside.  That positive, uplifting message, coupled with the song’s equally accessible musical arrangement, makes the song in whole both a strong start for Soul Asylum’s new album and just one example of how the album’s collective content makes it so enjoyable for the aforementioned audiences.  It is just one of the songs featured in the album that serves to exhibit the album’s appeal.  ‘Got It Pretty Good’ is another example of the album’s positive impact.

‘Got It Pretty Good’ is another work whose musical arrangement takes audiences back to the early 1990s with its bluesy-mid-tempo 4/4 construction.  The simple, guitar-driven work has plenty of infectious hooks and choruses that will stick in listeners’ minds long after the song (and album) ends.  While the song’s arrangement does more than enough to keep listeners engaged and entertained, it is only one part of what makes the song another notable addition to HUAW.  The song’s lyrical content adds its own share of interest to its whole.

Pirner sings in this song’s lead verse, “Well I went to the doctor/I was feeling bad/I got it pretty good/I went to the church/Try to see what they had/I got it pretty good/The psychiatrist sent me back to the priest/He just said keep your childhood Christian/Yes I got it/Yes I got it pretty good/I tried being mean/I tried being mean/I tried taking all of your advice/It’s time to shine/A fine time to remind me/I’m just fine/A fine time to unwind/Now’s your time to shine.”  He continues in the song’s second verse, “I got it/I got it/I got it pretty good/About to choke/I’m on my knees/Yes I got it pretty good/Well I tried being nice/I tried being mean/I live my life just keeping it clean/I got the fever/I got the fever/And I got it pretty good/Well I need a good hammer/And A couple of nails/Gonna build me a boat/Gonna set my sails/My time to shine/It’s a fine time to remind me/I’m doing just fine/If I can find the time/Now’s your time to shine.”  Pirner leaves little doubt at this point as to the song’s central lyrical theme.  This is a song that centers on people trying to tell us how to live, and that it is more important for us to live our own lives as we see fit.  If any doubt was left by now, Pirner eliminates it even more in the song’s third and final verse, singing, “It ain’t good or bad/Ain’t wrong or right/But I got it pretty good/I ain’t giving up/No I stay in the fight/’Cause I got it pretty good/I’m unraveling/I’m gonna unwind/I’m winding down if I can find the time/’Cause I got it pretty good/I tried being mean/I tried being nice/I tried taking all your advice/It’s time to shine/Fine time to remind me/Live your life…now’s your time to shine.”  Again, this is a reminder to take life at our own pace and live our lives for us, not based on what others tell us we should do.  In other words, it is a work that promotes individuality, a classic theme of so much rock music.  When this message is considered alongside the song’s musical arrangement, with its solid energy and positive sound, it becomes even clearer why this song is such an enjoyable addition to the album’s whole.  The two elements together do a lot to make the song stand out, and in turn, serve to show that much more why the album in whole is another positive offering from Soul Asylum.  While this song is clearly notable in its own way to the whole of HUAW, it is not the last of the album’s most notable entries.  ‘Silly Things,’ the album’s closer is one more example of what makes this album a welcome return for Soul Asylum.

‘Silly Things’ stands out from the previously discussed songs in that its musical arrangement is much more reserved.  It isn’t the album’s only reserved arrangement, but still maintains its own unique identity.  The simplicity of the semi-acoustic work, is its real draw.  Audiences get here, Pirner’s vocals alongside a very simple percussion line and equally simple guitar and bass, the whole lending itself to comparisons to so many classic honky-tonk country music from the late 80s and early 90s.  That semi-country sensibility couples with the song’s lyrical theme of life and love to make the whole that much more accessible to listeners.

Pirner sings in the song’s lead verse, “I’ve done a lot of silly things/I’ve found out just what trouble brings/You used to wear my silly ring/While I listened to my ears ring/I’ve done a lot of silly things/I used to think that I was cool/Break each and every rule/Now all the rules are just the same/It’s just a silly game/I used to do a lot of things/And when I fail/I will fail without you/And my mistakes/I’ll always answer to…I’ve done a lot of silly things/I know just what trouble brings/I’ve done a lot of silly things.”  He continues in the song’s second verse, “I used to like the way you walked/You used to like the way I talked/I used to do a lot of things/I used to think that I could see/I’ve done a lot of silly things/You used to like the way I move/You used to think that I was smooth/And if I ever had a chance/I would ask you out again/I’ve done a lot of stupid things/And when I fail/I will fail without you/I’ve been let down/Lord, so many times/No one to blame/But myself/To keep from getting down/I’ve done a lot of stupid thing/And I know just what trouble brings/I’ve done a lot of silly things.”  Here is someone who obviously is at the end of a relationship and is looking back at that relationship, even admitting that perhaps he was the one who has lost, as he notes he would ask out the woman again.  The story is furthered in the song’s third and final verse, in which Pirner sings, “When I play/I will play without you/It’s every man and woman for themselves/I feel I’ve learned the hard way/To put you before myself/I’ve done a lot of silly things/I’ve done a lot of stupid s***/I’m still trying to deal with this.”  Once again, here listeners have a person who is looking back at a broken relationship, realizing it is his fault that the relationship ended.  The thing is that to a point, he wishes he had that second chance.  Of course this is nothing new to the music industry, but Pirner and company have delivered a unique take on such a theme, both musically and lyrically here.  It is quite the contrast, both musically and lyrically, to the album’s opener, but still is an interesting work nonetheless.  When the song is considered along with ‘The Beginning,’ ‘Got It Pretty Good’ and other songs featured in the album, such as ‘Social Butterfly,’ ‘Freezer Burn’ and the album’s lead single ‘If I Told You’ and the rest of the album’s offerings, the whole of this record makes it another work that Soul Asylum’s longtime fans will assuredly enjoy.

Soul Asylum’s 12th full-length studio recording Hurry Up And Wait is another positive offering from the band.  That is due to the musical and lyrical content presented throughout the course of its 46-minute run time.  All three of the songs examined here do their own share to support that statement.  The same can be said of any of the album’s other featured works.  From start to finish, the musical arrangements will take listeners back to the 90s while the songs’ lyrical themes will reach plenty of listeners, too.  All things considered, the record’s combined musical and lyrical content makes Hurry Up And Wait a record that listeners will agree was worth the “wait.”

Soul Asylum launched a tour in support of the forthcoming record on Feb. 11.  The tour is scheduled to run through March 20 in Austin, TX and to feature performances in cities, such as Nashville, TN; Phoenix, AZ and Portland, ME.  The tour’s schedule is noted below.

 

SOUL ASYLUM ON TOUR – Local H supports all dates except where noted:
2/17 – Boston MA – Paradise
2/18 – Portland ME – Port City Music
2/19 – New York NY – Bowery Ballroom
2/21 – Philadelphia PA – TLA
2/22 – Leesburg, VA – Tally Ho Theatre
2/24 – Atlanta, GA  – Center Stage
2/25 – Nashville, TN – The Cowan
2/26 – Louisville, KY – Mercury Ballroom
2/28 – Kansas City, MO – The Madrid
2/29 – Colorado Springs, CO – Sunshine Studios Live
3/01 – Denver, CO – The Bluebird
3/03 – Billings, MT – Pub Station
3/05 – Salt Lake City, UT – Metro
3/07 – Reno, NV – Boomtown Casino *
3/08 – San Francisco, CA – Slims
3/11 – Los Angeles, CA – Teragram Ballroom
3/13 – San Diego, CA – Belly UP
3/14 – Las Vegas, NV – Silverton Casino *
3/15 – Phoenix, AZ – Marquee
3/16 – Albuquerque, NM – Sunshine
3/18 – Oklahoma City, OK – Diamond Ballroom
3/20 – Austin, TX – SXSW official showcase *

*Local H not appearing on these dates

 

 

More information on Soul Asylum’s new album, tour and more is available online now along with all of the band’s latest news and more at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.soulasylum.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SoulAsylum

Twitter: http://twitter.com/soulasylum

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Soul Asylum Debuts New LP’s Lead Single; Announces LP Release, Tour Dates

Courtesy: Blue Elan Records

Soul Asylum debuted the lead single from its new album this week.

The band debuted the song ‘If I Told You‘ Thursday.  The song is featured in the band’s forthcoming album Hurry Up And Wait.  The song’s steady, mid-tempo arrangement is comparable to some of the band’s older works, but is still catchy and original in its own right.  Its lyrical content will connect with listeners just as easily as its musical content, with the song’s subject grappling with his/her personal mixed thoughts and emotions.

Hurry Up And Wait is scheduled for release April 17 through Blue Elan Records.Front man Dave Pirner talked recently about the album’s creation, saying it was less stressful than making past Soul Asylum records.

“There was nothing, pressure-wise that was making it less of a smooth creative process — if there is such a thing,” he said.

Soul Asylum will launch a tour in support of Hurry Up and Wait Feb. 11 in Milwaukee, WI.  The tour, which will feature support from Local H, runs just over five weeks, with its finale planned for March 20 in Austin, TX.  The tour also features performances in cities, such as Billings, MT; New York, NY and Phoenix, AZ.  The tour’s schedule is noted below.

SOUL ASYLUM ON TOUR – Local H supports all dates except where noted:
2/11 – Milwaukee, Wi – Turner Hall
2/12 – Detroit MI – St Andrew’s Hall
2/14 – Chicago, IL  – Metro
2/15 – Cincinnati, OH – Riverfront Live
2/17 – Boston MA – Paradise
2/18 – Portland ME – Port City Music
2/19 – New York NY – Bowery Ballroom
2/21 – Philadelphia PA – TLA
2/22 – Leesburg, VA – Tally Ho Theatre
2/24 – Atlanta, GA  – Center Stage
2/25 – Nashville, TN – The Cowan
2/26 – Louisville, KY – Mercury Ballroom
2/28 – Kansas City, MO – The Madrid
2/29 – Colorado Springs, CO – Sunshine Studios Live
3/01 – Denver, CO – The Bluebird
3/03 – Billings, MT – Pub Station
3/05 – Salt Lake City, UT – Metro
3/07 – Reno, NV – Boomtown Casino *
3/08 – San Francisco, CA – Slims
3/11 – Los Angeles, CA – Teragram Ballroom
3/13 – San Diego, CA – Belly UP
3/14 – Las Vegas, NV – Silverton Casino *
3/15 – Phoenix, AZ – Marquee
3/16 – Albuquerque, NM – Sunshine
3/18 – Oklahoma City, OK – Diamond Ballroom
3/20 – Austin, TX – SXSW official showcase *

*Local H not appearing on these dates

 

Courtesy: Minnesota Historical Society Publishing

Along with its upcoming album and tour, Pirner is also preparing to release a new book, Loud, Fast, Words.  The book, an annotated collection of lyrics from the band’s albums, is scheduled for release in February through Minnesota Historical Society Publishing.

More information on Soul Asylum’s new album, single an tour, Pirner’s new book and all of Soul Asylum’s latest news is available online at:

 

Website: http://www.soulasylum.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SoulAsylum

Twitter: http://twitter.com/soulasylum

 

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Janey Street’s New EP Is Not The Kind Of Record That Listeners Know

Courtesy: Blue Elan Records

Courtesy: Blue Elan Records

Singer/songwriter Janey Street released her new EP I’m Not the Girl I Used to Know last Friday, March 18th.  The five-song, eighteen-minute record is an interesting new effort from the veteran New York-based artist.  That is due to a number of factors, not the least of which being the songs included in the record.  While there are only five songs featured in this disc they cover quite a bit of ground both in regards to their lyrical themes and musical arrangements.  In the same vein, the songs’ sequencing over the course of the record’s run time is just as important to its presentation.  That will be discussed later.  Last but hardly least of note in this EP is the songs’ production.  Thanks to their production, each song is expertly balanced, thus leading to the fullest emotional impact for listeners.  It brings everything full circle and in turn shows Street’s new EP to be anything but the kind of record that listeners know.  It is better.

Janey Street’s new EP I’m Not the Girl I Used to Know is anything but the kind of record that listeners know.  That is due in part to the songs that are featured in this record.  The songs that make up the EP’s body will keep listeners engaged both because of their lyrical themes and their musical arrangements.  In regards to the songs’ lyrical themes, the songs touch on a number of topics to which any listener will be able to relate.  Case in point the record’s opening number.  It is also the EP’s title track.  This bittersweet opus focuses on a figure (obviously a woman) that has gone through some really tough times in her life.  The difficult situations come across largely as relationship situations.  Street successfully translates the figure’s pain in her delivery of the song’s lyrical content, too.  The song’s musical arrangement adds even more interest to the song.  Its musical arrangement conjures thoughts of the power ballads that were so commonplace in the 1980s.  That is especially the case in the song’s bridge and its chorus.  Street’s work on the piano in the song’s verses makes the song just as moving.  The whole of the composition is a work that even as bittersweet as it is, is still a solid opener for Street’s new record.  That is especially when examining the whole of the EP in regards to its sequencing.  That will be discussed later.  Staying on the topic at hand the EP’s opener is just one example of how its songs play an integral role in its presentation.  ‘Situation’ is another important addition to the record’s body.

‘I’m Not the Girl I Used to Know,’ the opener and title track to Janey Street’s new EP is a solid opener to the disc.  It is also a prime example of the importance of the record’s songs both in regards to their lyrical themes and their musical arrangements.  It is just one example of what makes the record’s songs important.  ‘Situation’ is another example of what makes the record’s songs so important.  In regards to its lyrical theme, Street comes across as trying to say to listeners that tough times happen in life.  They happen to everybody and in every way regardless of a person’s age.  From difficult relationship situations to something as general as a child trying to make friends, she notes that there are many different tough situations in life.  She approaches this theme with the utmost gentility, reminding listeners that everybody goes through those varied difficult situations (thus the song’s title).  It is a reminder to listeners for when they begin to feel like the world is against them or even coming down around them that they are not the only ones that are going through something difficult or even have ever done so.  The song’s musical arrangement is just as gentle in its approach.  It isn’t the painful sound established in the EP’s opener.  But there is a certain element about it that while bittersweet helps illustrate the hopeful message presented in the song’s lyrical content.  Keeping that in mind, the two elements join together to make this motivational piece another prime example of what makes the album’s songs so important to its overall presentation.  It isn’t the last example either.  ‘My Side of Paradise,’ which allegedly is a biographical piece, is another key example of what makes this record’s songs so important to its overall presentation.

‘I’m Not the Girl I Used to Know’ and ‘Situation’ are both key examples of what makes the songs in this new EP so important to its presentation.  They are both worth noting because of their lyrical themes and accompanying musical arrangements.  Both elements work together in each song to give each work the fullest impact on listeners.  ‘My Side of Paradise’ is one more example of what makes the EP’s songs so important to its presentation.  The song is allegedly autobiographical.  In comparison to the EP’s first three songs it takes a much happier tone.  This is important to note.  That is because of the role that it plays into the EP’s sequencing.  Street sings about seeing the sun and people walking around with radios 80s style on their shoulders.  What’s really interesting here is that even with that throwback reference the song doesn’t boast an 80s sound.  Rather it’s more modern sounding than anything from that era.  That is at least this critic’s take on the song.  In general, the song a direct contrast to the record’s first three offerings.  It is also the beginning of a noticeable change in the record’s overall, tone.  Again, that is a reference to the record’s sequencing.  The EP’s closer ‘Bring It On’ completes that change in attitude that begins on the exactly opposite pole in its opener.  It presents Street’s subject with a cautious optimism in her attempt to give love a second chance.  Together with the rest of the EP’s featured songs it finishes off the record and shows once more exactly why the EP’s songs are in themselves important to the disc’s presentation.  As important as they are to the record they are not the record’s only important elements.  The EP’s sequencing is just as important to its presentation as the songs themselves.

The songs that are included in Janey Street’s new EP are in their own way a collectively important part of the record’s presentation.  That is because of the ability of the songs to reach listeners with their relatable subject matter.  The music that accompanies each of the songs serves to better set the songs’ mood in each case, thus making each piece more easily reach listeners and keep listeners engaged.  As important as all of this is to Street’s new EP, they are only a portion of what makes the record stand out.  The disc’s sequencing is just as important as the songs.  As a matter of fact both elements work hand in hand.  In listening through the record, there is a noticeable change in attitude as the record progresses.  It starts out with its emotionally painful title track.  From there, Street offers a somewhat similarly bittersweet composition in ‘Tears Taste The Same’ before the mood gradually begins to change in ‘Situation.’  While still somewhat bittersweet in its approach, there is still a certain, slight sense of hope and optimism here as Street reminds listeners that everybody faces their own tough situations in life no matter age or gender.  That revelation having been made, the EP then grows even more optimistic in ‘My Side of Paradise.’  The song comes across as presenting someone on that other side of life’s tough situations.  The whole thing is rounded out in the disc’s closer ‘Bring It On.’  The song is in direct contrast to the EP’s opener.  That is because whereas the disc’s opener was sad and contemplating, this composition presents someone that has perhaps gotten over the hurdles of love’s bad side and is now facing the chance of finding love again, albeit with a certain amount of cautious optimism.  Even with that caution the song’s overall vibe comes across as being the polar opposite of the EP’s opener.  Looking back through the whole of the disc’s eighteen minutes, it is clear over that time that the disc’s sequencing presents an emotional journey that every listener will appreciate.  It’s just one more way that I’m Not the Girl I Used to Know stands out.  It still is not the EP’s only remaining important element.  The disc’s production is just as important to note as the songs and their sequencing.

Both the songs that are featured in Janey Street’s new EP and their sequencing are important elements of the record’s presentation.  The songs present five wholly different scenarios that generate five completely different moods.  The songs’ sequencing takes listeners on a musical and emotional journey that they will enjoy and appreciate after having given the record in whole a chance.  Keeping this in mind, they are not the only important elements to be noted of the record’s presentation.  Its production is just as important as its sequencing and its songs.  The record’s production is just as important as the songs and their sequencing.  That is because the songs’ production is what really brings out the emotion of each song.  The disc’s opening number is proof of this.  When Street breaks into the classic 80s power ballad style guitar solos, they don’t come across as overpowering (no pun intended).  They are expertly balanced with the song’s other elements, thus making them the song’s most notable moment.  And in ‘Bring It On’ the string arrangements are just subtle enough against Street’s guitar work and vocal delivery to give the song that full emotional impact in its case.  In a similar vein, the balance of the song’s keyboards and electronics in ‘My Side of Paradise’ give the song just enough of a playful, infectious vibe to make it a fan favorite.  Whether through this song or any of the others included in this disc, it can be said of the record in whole that its production proves just as important to its presentation as its sequencing and its songs.  All things considered I’m Not  the Girl I Used to Know proves in the end to be a record that is anything but the kind of record that listeners know.  It is better.

I’m Not the Girl I Used to Know is a record that, even being just a five-track EP, is anything but the kind of record that listeners know.  That is evident through its five songs, which present a group of compositions that will move listeners both to tears at times and to smiles at others.  Its songs even have the potential to move listeners to both at the same time.  The record’s featured songs are just part of what makes this record stand out.  The sequencing of its songs are just as important to the record as the songs themselves.  That is because of the emotional and musical journey on which it takes listeners.  The songs’ sequencing takes listeners from the depths of sadness to the cautious happiness of having beaten that sadness.  There’s no denying that the songs were sequenced in the order in which they are presented here.  That being the case it shows exactly why the record’s sequencing is so important.  The record’s production rounds out its most important elements.  Its production is what gives each song its emotional impact.  Together with the songs and their sequencing, all three elements combine to make the record, again, one that is anything but the kind of record that listeners know.  It is a record that even being an EP, is well worth the listen.  It is available now in stores and online.  More information on I’m Not the Girl I Used to Know is available online now along with all of Janey Street’s latest news at:

 

Website: http://www.janeystreet.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/janey.street

Twitter: http://twitter.com/TheJaneyStreet

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.