Record Kicks’ New Compilation Record Is A Strong Introduction To The Label And Its Acts

Courtesy: Record Kicks

Independent record label Record Kicks is closing out 2020 in an intriguing fashion.  The label released a new compilation record Friday to finish out the year.  Dubbed Breaks and Beats: Funk Breaks & Hot Instrumentals, the 12-song collection is composed of 48 minutes worth of instrumentals from some of the biggest hits of the acts signed to the label.  The record’s makeup – in regards to its featured songs — is itself a key aspect to the compilation and will be discussed shortly.  The sequencing of the record’s songs also plays into its interest.  This aspect will be discussed a little later.  The songs’ production rounds out the record’s most important elements.  Alongside the noted aspects of the songs and their sequencing, the compilation in whole proves itself an interesting new presentation from Record Kicks that is worth the occasional play.

Record Kicks’ newly released compilation record Breaks and Beats: Funk Breaks & Hot Instrumentals is an interesting new offering from the independent record label.  It is a presentation that audiences will find well worth taking in at least once if not more.  That is proven in part through its featured songs.  The songs themselves are works from a handful of the more than 30 artists and acts who are signed to the label.  Some of the featured artists and acts have released new material in the past year or so, too.  That might be why they were featured here.  Among those featured are the likes of Calibro 35, Hannah Williams and the Affirmations, Marta Ren, and The Tibbs, each of whom has released new music this year.  Between those noted acts and the others featured in the record, what audiences really get here is not only a sampling of new music from many of the featured acts, but also an introduction to those acts for those audiences who might be less familiar with the noted acts.  To that end, having so many acts and so much music to introduce to so many listeners forms a strong foundation for the compilation.  With any luck, the introduction to all of that music will encourage listeners to discover even more music from those acts.  This is just one aspect of what makes Breaks and Beats: Funk Breaks & Hot Instrumentals such an interesting collection of songs.  The sequencing of the record’s songs adds to that interest in its own right.

Thee sequencing of Breaks and Beats: Funk Breaks & Hot Instrumentals is important because of the clear attention paid to the record’s energy exhibited in this aspect.  The album starts off on a mid-tempo fashion in its first half before gradually starting to pick up just before its midway point.  From there, the energy gradually pulls back in ‘Soul Run.’  It starts out higher energy but then starts to gradually ease back as the song progresses.  From there, the compilation’s energy picks back up again gradually to a steady, mid-tempo feel right to the record’s end.  The short and simple is that the compilation’s energy is well-balanced throughout even with the stylistic approach and sounds staying relatively similar from one song to the next.  The changes in the energy are so subtle throughout, but just noticeable enough in that subtlety.  The result is that the record will ensure listeners’ engagement and entertainment through its overall feel as much as for its content.  Keeping all of this in mind, it still is not the last of the compilation’s most important elements.  The record’s production rounds out its most important elements.

Funk as a genre typically presents arrangements that typically are very busy.  Between guitars, drums, horns, (and vocals), most funk songs feature a wide range of instruments and lines.  The songs that are featured in this compilation are no exception to that rule.  Whether it be the combination of keyboards, drums, guitars and horns in Calibro 35’s aptly titled ‘CLBR 35,’ the more laid back but still rich mix of instruments in The Devonns’ ‘Tell Me’ or even the mix of instruments in The Liberators’ ‘Episco,’ the fact of the matter is that each of the songs featured in this compilation was precisely produced.  No one instrument outdid the others at any point in any song.  The dynamics overall were perfection, bringing about so much great emotion from listeners.  To that end, this aesthetic element of Breaks and Beats: Funk Breaks & Hot Instrumentals cements the engagement and enjoyment for the record.  In turn, it will no doubt encourage plenty of listeners to discover even more music from the record’s featured acts.  Considering that along with the compilation’s content and sequencing thereof, the whole of this compilation proves to be a positive presentation from Record Kicks that audiences will enjoy.

Record Kicks’ new compilation record Breaks and Beats: Funk Breaks & Hot Instrumentals is an interesting new offering from the label.  Usually, compilation sets are thrown out during the summer as mid-year space fillers rather than at year’s end.  That aside, the record is still a presentation that will entertain and engage listeners.  That is proven in part through its featured songs, which give audiences a nice introduction to just some of the label’s many acts.  The sequencing of the compilation’s featured songs adds its own element of enjoyment and engagement to the record.  The production presented in each song puts the final touch to the record’s presentation, bringing everything full circle.  Each item noted here is important in its own way to the whole of the compilation.  All things considered, they make Breaks and Beats: Funk Breaks & Hot Instrumentals an enjoyable last offering from Record Kicks for 2020 and gives hope for what 2021 has to bring from the label.  Breaks and Beats: Funk Breaks & Hot Instrumentals is available now digitally.

More information on this and other titles from Record Kicks is available online at:

Website: http://www.recordkicks.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/recordkicks

Twitter: http://twitter.com/RecordKicks

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.  

Calibro 35 Crosses Musical Boundaries On Its Seventh Full-Length Studio Recording

Courtesy: Record Kicks

Calibro 35 apparently is a group that does not rest easy on its laurels.  The veteran musical collective will release its latest full-length studio recording Jan. 24, less than a year after the group released its sixth album Decade.  The group’s forthcoming collection of songs, titled Momentum, is a wonderful jumping on point for any audiophile who may be less familiar with the veteran outfit’s work than its more seasoned fans.  It is a work that will easily appeal to fans of acts, such as Jagajazzist, Gorillaz and Handsome Boy Modeling School with its largely instrumental makeup.  Save for two songs, the 10-song, 38-minute record is largely composed of instrumental compositions that boast a variety of elements and styles.  One of the most notable of those instrumental compositions comes late in the album’s run in the form of the song ‘Thunderstorms and Data.’  For all that ‘Thunderstorms and Data’ offers audiences, its follow-up, ‘Black Moon (ft. Mei)’ – one of the record’s only tracks with vocals – offers its own share of entertainment and engagement.  ‘Death of Storytelling,’ which comes early in the record’s run is another of the album’s many instrumental tracks.  It stands on its own merits just as much as the other songs addressed here.  When it and those songs are considered along with the rest of the album’s entries, the record in whole proves itself to be an early candidate for a spot on any critic’s list of the year’s top new hip-hop/rap albums and best overall new albums.

Veteran music collective Calibro 35’s members recently said of the group’s forthcoming seventh album Momentum, that it “is the prequel of what you will hear in the next ten years” from the group.  If that is the case, then considering the fact that the band has already released six other albums prior to this record, it is a strong statement about where the group is headed.  That is proven in part late in the album in the song ‘Thunderstorms and Data.’  This full-on experimental opus is one of the album’s strongest points, opening with some gentle chimes that very quickly give way to a semi-brooding keyboard line that easily lends itself to comparisons to works from the likes of Daft Punk.  Those electronic elements are accompanied by – believe it or not – some distinct jazz elements and even some hip-hop elements throughout the course of the song’s nearly four-minute run.  The combination of those elements and their subtleties couples with the song’s different movements to make the composition in whole a clear example of what makes Momentum a sign of Calibro 35’s forward momentum.  It is just one of the songs that stands out in this album.  ‘Black Moon (ft. Mei)’ stands strong on its own merits just as much as ‘Thunderstorms and Data.’

‘Black Moon (ft. Mei)’ is one of only two tracks featured in Momentum that includes vocals with its musical content.  The song’s musical content, with it guitar, bass and drums, boasts some old school soul and funk influence while also presenting some more modern hip-hop and rap elements alongside those soul and funk elements.  The collective of those elements makes the song’s musical content alone more than enough reason to take in the song.  The lyrical content that partners with the noted musical content adds even more engagement and entertainment to the whole of the song.

Mei presents some distinctly positive vibes in the song’s lead verse, making statements, such as “ready more than ready for this rhythm” and “navigate these streets though they murky.”  She adds in the lead verse, “Never stop ‘cause our enemies are thirsty/Survive off the power that’s in we.”  Mei’s flow in the song’s second verse is so fluid that trying to follow her without a lyrics sheet is next to impossible.  That is meant in the best way possible.  However, what can be inferred through what can be understood, is that the song’s second verse presents more positive lyrical vibes from Mei.  That being considered along with the positive message in the song’s lead verse and the infectious grooves in the song’s musical arrangement, the whole of this work serves to show even more why Calibro 35’s forthcoming seventh album is on course to be a big hit for the group on both sides of the Atlantic.

‘Black Moon (Ft. Mei)’ goes a long way to entertain and engage audiences on Calibro 35’s latest album, just as does ‘Thunderstorms and Data.’  While the two noted songs do a lot to prove why Momentum is an enjoyable new offering from the group, they are only two of the songs featured in the record that serve to show its appeal.  ‘Death Of Storytelling,’ which comes early in the album’s run, is yet another example of the album’s strength.  The song clearly boasts its own hip-hop influence.  At the same time though, the use of the guitar to build on the song’s foundation added to that element gives the song a while new feeling and identity.  The coupling of the elements makes the song sound like something that would serve well as the music bed for a song by Eminem or Mike Shinoda.  That is meant in the absolutely most respectful manner possible toward all involved.  The feeling in the arrangement, the tempo and the balance of the elements – including the keyboards – makes the song in whole one of the record’s most moving moments and most memorable in turn.  It truly leaves a lasting impression and is deserving of being one of the album’s singles along with the other two songs addressed here.  When it is considered with those songs and the rest of the album’s entries, the end result is a work that proves without doubt, Calibro 35 still has plenty of its own momentum.

Calibro 35’s seventh full-length studio recording Momentum is a strong new offering from the veteran music collective.  One would think that seven albums in, any act would be showing some signs of wear and tear.  That is especially the case when the group has been recording and touring for a dozen years.  In the case of this group though, this record shows that the group has no plans to slow down any time soon.  The mostly instrumental compositions that make up the record’s body show that this group can easily hold its own against its American counterparts.  That is due to the diversity of the arrangements and the clear time and thought put into each arrangement.  Whether in the songs addressed here or through the record’s other entries, the album in whole proves to be an early, easy candidate for any critic’s list of the year’s top new albums overall.  More information on the album is available online now along with all of the group’s latest news at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.calibro35.net

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/calibro35

Twitter: http://twitter.com/Calibro35

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.