Corinth Films’ PBS Doc Presentation Is A Mostly Successful Offering

Courtesy: Corinth Films

Franklin D. Roosevelt’s famous New Deal Program is one of the most pivotal government efforts in America’s history.  The program puts thousands of Americans who were left jobless and penniless due to the Great Depression back to work.  As a result, it led to one the nation’s greatest economic recoveries if not the greatest.  Fro all that the program did to benefit Americans and the nation, there are parts of the program that are lesser-known than those infrastructure jobs, etc.  One of those programs, the Works Progress Administration, helped put just as many to work as it addressed the arts.  Thanks to Corinth Films, the documentary, which originally aired on PBS in April 1981 received renewed attention in July with a first-ever DVD release.  The story that makes up the 90-minute program is the presentation’s heart.  It will be examined shortly.  The booklet that accompanies the DVD adds some interest to the presentation, too and will be discussed a little later.  The DVD’s pricing is its own important element, content considered.  It will also be addressed later.  Each item noted is its own important part of the whole here.  All things considered, they make the DVD an interesting addition to this year’s field of new documentaries.

Corinth Films’ presentation of the vintage PBS documentary, The New Deal for Artists is an intriguing presentation.  Despite what its title infers, the documentary will appeal to more than just artists and people with any interest in art.  That is because of its story.  The story, which is narrated by famed actor Orson Welles, explains how FDR’s New Deal Program aided not jut the nation’s infrastructure, but its culture, too.  It points out that the program and its WPA Arts Project put artists and photographers back to work as well as actors.  They were put back to work as the program created for instance, the model for what would have otherwise become the first federal theater program.  It also led to artists creating murals and paintings that mirrored the nation’s people at the time.  What’s more, it also balked at segregation, so to speak, as it even gave African-Americans work in theater on stage and behind the scenes of so many plays.

As the program progresses, it delves even deeper in its second half.  Audiences learn along the way, that politics (specifically conservatives) led to the eventual demise of the short-lived WPA Art Programs.  That is due in part to the fact that said conservatives did not like that many of the pictures, murals, and plays crafted through the programs were very socially conscious.  Additionally, some of those who were put back to work through the programs admitted through archived interviews that, yes, they were Communist sympathizers, which played right into the hands of congressional members who were already looking for any reason to cut the programs since their products made them so uncomfortable.  That duality exhibited here – the efforts by Roosevelt to preserve the arts and the efforts by his Conservative detractors to shut down the programs just because they hated him – and the way in which it is all presented makes the story in whole fully engaging and entertaining.  Keeping all of that in mind, the story featured in this documentary is itself surprisingly interesting.  It is just too bad that the doc’s title is so misleading, which is very likely to deter many from otherwise watching.

While there is no denying that the title of The New Deal for Artists is problematic, it is not enough to make the presentation a complete failure.  That is proven through the program, as audiences will see when they actually give the documentary a chance.  Once audiences realize just how surprisingly intriguing the documentary’s story is, the next thing they will appreciate is the information provided in the documentary’s companion booklet.  That information in question comes through a pair of essays written separately by Armond White and Ed Rampell.  The essays are for all intents and purposes really just two other reviews of the documentary.  What makes them stand out is the additional background that they put into the mix along with their personal opinions.  White for instance, explains how the WAP Arts Programs benefited Americans and the nation because it helped improve Americans’ morale.  Additionally, he points out Welles’ role as narrator, and its importance even though he is that third person observing it all.

Rampell meanwhile, points out how many people in the nation’s arts community were put back to work.  On the surface, the thousands noted seems like it is not much.  When that number is considered along with the other thousands returned to payrolls in general, it makes for an even bigger number, showing just how important how the New Deal was.  Additionally, he adds his own statement about the impact of those noted Conservatives in Washington, D.C. who worked so hard to shut down the programs just because they did not like that they pointed out how much Americans were struggling.  That and so many more from Rampell and White offers audiences plenty to appreciate from the program’s overall presentation.  Considering that content and the program’s primary content in whole, it collectively makes the documentary worth watching at least once.  It is still only part of what makes the documentary worth seeing.  Its pricing rounds out its most important elements.

The average price point for The New Deal for Artists is $21.81.  That price is obtained by averaging prices listed through Amazon, Walmart, Best Buy, Barnes & Noble Booksellers, and Books-A-Million.  It was not listed through Target at the time of this review’s posting.  While the average breaks the $20 mark, only Barnes & Noble Booksellers and Books-A-Million break that point from the get go.  B&N lists the DVD at $24.99 while Books-A-Million is slightly less expensive at $24.95.  So for all intents and purposes they are roughly the same, especially when shipping and handling is added to the mix.  Walmart actually lists the least expensive price at $19.28.  Amazon and Best Buy each list the DVD at $19.99.  So while they will break the $20 mark when shipping & handling are added, they will still be far less expensive than ordering it through the other noted retailers.  To that end, the price in general is still not that bad especially comparing the separate listings to the DVD’s average price point.  Keeping that in mind along with the positives put forth through the DVD’s primary and secondary content, the whole comes together to make the DVD overall a mostly successful presentation that will appeal to a wide range of audiences.

Corinth Films’ presentation of the vintage PBS documentary, The New Deal for Artists is a surprisingly engaging and entertaining work.  It is a doc that will appeal to a wide range of audiences, from history buffs, to art history lovers and students, to even those of theater and photography.  The title just does not make that clear enough, though it is really the program’s only shortfall.  It does show, though, the importance of proper titling for marketing purposes.  The secondary content featured in the presentation that is exhibited in the DVD’s companion booklet adds to the interest.  This even though that content is really just a pair of other reviews marketed as essays.  Considering the amount of content and the depth thereof, the DVD’s general pricing proves positive in its own right.  That is because it is relatively affordable.  Each item examined is important in its own right to the whole of the DVD.  All things considered, they make this DVD a mostly successful presentation.

The New Deal for Artists is available.  More information on this and other titles from Corinth Films is available at:

Websitehttps://corinthfilms.com

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/corinthfilms1977

Twitterhttps://twitter.com/corinthfilms

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

‘The Interrogation’ Gets Everything Right About Historical Dramas The American Studios, Filmmakers Get Wrong

Courtesy: Corinth Films

Movies that are based on actual events are a dime a dozen here in the United States. Hollywood’s “Big Six” studios have made a habit of making them into their own genre ever since the golden age of cinema. The problem is that the movies that have and continue to fill out that genre are largely forgettable since they are more spectacle than actual history. This has made the genre and its movies anything but credible. Thankfully in 2016, the foreign historical drama The Interrogation came along and shook things up in that genre. Directed by Israeli director Erez Pery and released in Israel through a partnership between various Israeli firms, the 85-minute presentation was re-issued this summer on DVD through Corinth Films. Its release this year marked the fourth time it has been released to DVD since its theatrical release, having most recently been released on DVD in 2017 through Film Movement. The movie, in its presentation here, succeeds in large part because nothing was added or removed in terms of bonus content. So keeping that in mind, the most important of the movie’s aspects is its story and how it is presented. This element will be discussed shortly. The work of the movie’s two lead actors also plays into the presentation and will be discussed a little later. The cinematography puts the finishing touch to the whole, showing once more how much this simple story has to offer audiences. It will also be discussed later. Each item noted is important in its own way to the whole of The Interrogation. All things considered, they make this movie a near perfect example of how to properly make a movie that is based on actual events.

Corinth Films’ recent DVD re-issue of the Israeli independent movie The Interrogation is among the most unique of this year’s field of new DVD/BD re-issues. While its release this summer marks at least the fourth time that it has been re-issued since its theatrical debut in 2016, there are still plenty of audiences who have yet to see the movie. To that end, the re-issue proves just as welcome as its predecessors. The movie proves worth seeing in large part through its story. The story in question follows the interrogation of Nazi SS officer and Auschwitz Commandant Rudolf Hoss by Polish investigation judge Albert. Hiss is played here by Romanus Fuhrmann while Albert (no last name is given to Albert) is portrayed by Maciej Marczewski. The interrogation takes place in an interview room at the prison where Hoss was taken following his arrest in 1946 by British troops in Germany. Hoss recounts through the story, how he came to join the Nazi military regime and eventually become the longest serving Commandant at the infamous Auschwitz death camp. Throughout each interview that Albert holds with Hoss, Hoss remains so cold, so straight forward even as he attempts to paint himself as a victim, someone afraid to stand up to his own Nazi superiors. It is difficult to believe that Hoss was really a victim in any of what he oversaw despite his straight forward responses, and Albert does not buy into Hoss’ lamentations, either, as he shows more than once. This will be addressed later in the discussion on the acting. What is really interesting here is that Pery and co-writer Sari Azoulay Turgeman could have easily gone the typical historical drama route during these sessions and used flashbacks within the story, presenting re-enactments of the atrocities over which Hoss saw. Thankfully they did not go that route. Nor did they incorporate any grand soliloquies or over the top dialogue between Albert and Hoss. It actually enhances the story because it is that straight forward and simple. What’s more, there is no soundtrack at any point. Audiences only hear the sound of the two men talking and the whir of the tape recorder as it captures Hoss’ confession. There are also natural sounds as Hoss recalls his life before becoming part of the Nazi death machine, such as horses and birds as footage of calm, quiet countryside is shown. It all really makes everything seem so cold, almost as if to reflect the cold, callous nature of Hoss and what he did during his time at Auschwitz. It all makes the story itself so powerful and that much more engaging and entertaining. To that end, the story and its presentation is something from which so many American studio executives and filmmakers should and could learn. The story and its presentation are just part of what makes The Interrogation so gripping. The workd put in by Marczewski and Fuhrmann is also of note here.

As already pointed out, Marczewski and Fuhrmann are the main actors in The Interrogation. Yes, there are a few extras in the form of a few Russian guards at the prison where Hoss is held, and a woman (It is unknown if the woman is Albert’s wife or another woman), and two other men held at the prison. Their roles are secondary, but add their own importance as to how Albert handles the emotional and mental strain of dealing with Hoss. Marczewski, in his declarations that he does not belief Hoss’ attempts to make himself a victim, is so professional. He easily could have chewed the scenery so to speak, but instead the control that he gives Albert as Albert goes toe to toe with Hoss is so powerful in itself. In the same vein, seeing how Albert handles the strain of it all, even reaching a shocking breaking point in the story’s end, is just as powerful. It makes him even more relatable for audiences. That is because of the subtle way in which Hoss’ confessions impact him. We are all impacted mentally and emotionally by various situations, and we let those impacts build until they reach a boiling point. That is exactly what happens with Albert here.

Focusing on Fuhrmann, his cold, straight forward demeanor is just as powerful in its own way. The way in which Fuhrmann emotes throughout evokes so much power, especially as he tells Albert about his past. There seems to be no sense of remorse in any of Hoss’ discussion on that point. Albert even makes note of it, as already discussed. It leaves one really not believing that Hoss was that unwilling of a participant in what happened at Auschwitz. That makes the performance all the richer on the part of Fuhrmann. When Fuhrmann and Marczewski’s performances are considered together, their collective makes for even more reason for audiences to watch this movie. When their work is considered along with the very story featured in this movie, that reason to watch increases even more. Keeping all of that in mind, it is only a part of what makes the movie worth viewing. The movie’s cinematography rounds out the movie’s most important elements.

The cinematography presented in The Interrogation is important in that it is just as simple as everything else. The various angles and lighting used in the prison sets (Hoss’ cell and the interview room) are prime examples of the cinematography’s impact. The cold white-painted cindeblock of the interview room is its own echo of the coldness from Hoss. One can even argue that the industrial sense that it enhances the sense of hopelessness that perhaps Hoss has in knowing what lies ahead. The way that the lighting was used here gives the noted scenes such a grim feeling that viewers will fully experience.

The lighting that is used as Hoss sits in his cell, writing his memoir is an important part of the cinematography because it serves to help translate Hoss’ own darkness as he awaits his fate, knowing he has no chance of escaping what is coming. That lighting, as he looks outside his cell does much the same. By contrast, those rich meadow scenes that are presented as Hoss recalls his youth and civilian adult life make for even more power against the cold, industrial feeling established by the prison walls and lighting. It leaves one wondering for just a moment, if in fact Hoss’ might have actually regretted taking part in the Holocaust, but that wonder lasts only a second. It is just one more example of the importance of the cinematography to this presentation. When the overall work behind the lens is considered along with the movie’s story and the work of Fuhrmann and Marczewski, the whole comes together to make The Interrogation a historical drama that is done right. Maybe just maybe one day American movie makers and studio heads will take a movie such as this as a guiding point when they make their next historical drama(s).

Corinth films’ recent re-issue of the independent Israeli historical drama, The Interrogation is a welcome addition to this year’s field of DVD and BD re-issues. That is because it is such a stark contrast to all of the movies based on actual events that are churned out by American studios every year. It is a welcome cinematic breath of fresh air in that genre. The story is simple. It follows the interrogation of one of the most notorious members of the Nazi party, ironically, by a Polish interrogation judge. For those who don’t know, Poland is one of the nations that was ravaged by the Nazis, so that very aspect makes for its own interest. There are no overblown flashback scenes, no unnecessary dialogue and soliloquies, or anything else that is so common from American studios in the genre’s movies. The acting is also simple, making it that much more engaging, again so counter to that of so much American cinematic drama. The cinematography puts the finishing touch to the presentation, as it plays into the movie’s overall mood in its own unique way. It brings everything together, completing the presentation. Each item examined here is important in its own way to the whole of this movie’s presentation. All things considered, they make The Interrogation one of this year’s top new DVD and BD re-issues.

The Interrogation is available now. More information on this and other titles from Corinth Films is available at:

Websitehttps://corinthfilms.com

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/corinthfilms1977

Twitterhttps://twitter.com/corinthfilms

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Corinth Films’ Ghanaian Import, ‘Nakom’ Is An Imperfect But Engaging Story

Courtesy: Corinth Films

The independent movie community has, over the course of recent years, done a lot to offer audiences worthwhile alternatives to the nonstop barrage of prequels, sequels, reboots, and movies based on actual events being constantly churned out by Hollywood’s major studios.  The recent release of the period dramedy Scenes From an Empty Church proof of that.  Much the same can be said of Corinth Films’ British import, The Carer and Film Movement’s German import, Bye, Bye Germany.  These movies, and indie flicks, such as Butter, Shanghai Calling, and The Decoy Bride are even more proof of how much the indie film community has offered audiences in the way of real, and real entertaining options.  Of course even in the indie community, not every movie can be a success.  Corinth Films’ Ghanaian import, Nakom is one of those lesser movies.  Now that is not to say that the movie is a total failure.  It does have at least some positive, that being its story.  The story will be discussed shortly.  While the story is reason enough to watch, the pacing thereof is problematic, taking away from the presentation to a point.  This will be discussed a little later.  Luckily it is not enough to completely doom the presentation.  The cinematography also plays into the movie’s appeal, too, and will also be discussed later.  Each item noted here is important in its own way to the whole of the presentation.  All things considered, Nakom ultimately proves itself to be a presentation that is worth watching at least once.

Corinth Films’ recent Ghanaian import, Nakom — released to Western audiences Aug. 17 on DVD – is an imperfect presentation, though is still worth watching at least once.  The movie’s appeal comes in large part through its story.  The story in question centers on its lead character, Iddrisu.  Iddrisu is a young, soon-to-be doctor who is doing quite well in his medical studies.  Out of the blue, one day, he receives a call from his sister informing him that his father has been killed in a motorcycle wreck in Iddrisu’s home village of Nakom.  At first Iddrisu reluctantly stays, though he aims to return to his studies.  He ends up staying much longer than he originally planned.  That is partially of his own doing and partially due to pressure from his family and those in the village.  Eventually the pressure from self and from others becomes too much and Iddrisu reaches a breaking point.  How it all ends will be left for audiences to discover for themselves.  The thing is that this is a story that will connect easily with audiences because it is that believable.  It is not some over-the-top tale.  Many if not all people have been in the position of being torn between a sense of self and a sense of duty, whether in the sense of this story or another.  That in itself and the way in which the story is executed ensures viewers’ engagement and entertainment from beginning to end of the 90-minute movie.

On a related note, Jacob Ayanaba (who plays Iddrisu) does so well in his performance.  He comes across as such an “everyman” in his subtle performance throughout.  It makes suspension of disbelief in the story that much easier.  Whether trying to comfort his cousin at the area hospital after learning of her pregnancy or handling the mental and emotional stress of taking on his father’s financial debt, or even trying to encourage another young, female member of his family to go to school, his performance is so genuine.  It makes it so easy for audiences to relate to him.  Taking that into account along with the story, the bigger picture here is solid proof of why the story featured here works so well.

For all that the movie’s featured story does to appeal to audiences, it is not perfect.  The story’s one sole flaw comes in its pacing.  The runs approximately 90 minutes, which is really not that long.  Even in that time, there are some moments throughout in which the story tends to drag.  Those moments are multiple, too.  Some of those moments come as Iddrisu is studying and finds himself distracted by something.  They also come at times as Iddrisu is eating meals with his family and little else is going on except for some dialogue.  Those and a handful of other moments will tend to leave the movie feeling far longer than its run time.  In turn, it will leave audiences feeling the desire to fast forward through the movie more than once.  Even with that in mind, the story is still not a total failure, but also not a total success.

Keeping in mind everything noted here, Nakom proves to be an imperfect presentation, though still worth watching at least once.  Making the movie more worth the watch is its cinematography.  Audiences will be pleased to know that the entire presentation was filmed on-site in Ghana.  So all of the stunning sunrise and sunset footage was really captured in the nation’s countryside.  The footage of Iddrisu selling onions in the area markets is actually that of markets in the nation.  The rural roads which he travels are also real.  It might not seem like much on the surface, but the reality is that it actually adds to viewers’ ability to suspend their disbelief.  The colors are so rich both in the daytime and even at night.  What’s more, knowing that the scenes are in fact real instead of CG will encourage audiences to remain engaged even more.  Again, it is an aesthetic element, but it plays so much into the presentation.  Keeping that in mind along with the impact of the story and the acting (and even the pacing thereof), the whole makes the movie that much more worth watching, if only once.

Corinth Films’ recently released DVD presentation of Nakom is a presentation that while imperfect, is still worth watching at least once.  That is proven in part through the movie’s story.  The story is relatable in its focus.  The situation in which Iddrisu finds himself and how he handles it will connect with most if not all viewers.  The work put in by lead actor Jacob Ayanaba interpreting the script adds to the appeal.  The subtle way in which he takes on the role throughout makes the story that much more worth watching.  While the story and the acting are both of positive note, the story’s pacing proves somewhat problematic.  That is because it tends to drag at multiple points throughout the movie’s 90-minute run time.  Luckily, that issue is not enough to completely derail the movie.  The movie’s cinematography adds its own appeal to the whole, offering even more reason for audiences to watch.  Knowing that the movie was shot entirely on site in Ghana adds a certain sense of realism to the movie, in turn encouraging audiences to watch even more.  Keeping this and everything else noted in mind, the movie proves to be a presentation that while imperfect, is still worth watching at least once.

Nakom is available now.  More information on this and other titles from Corinth Films is available at:

Websitehttps://corinthfilms.com

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/corinthfilms1977

Twitterhttps://twitter.com/corinthfilms

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

‘Mambo Man’ Is A Heavy Drama That Is Worth Watching At Least Once

Courtesy: Corinth Films

If it is too good to be true, it probably is.  Everyone knows that adage.  It is at the center of Tumi Productions’ 2020 movie, Mambo Man.  The independent Cuban flick originally premiered in June 2020 at the Crownwood International Film Festival in India and made its way to American theaters only months later in September.  That release was followed by a DVD release Feb. 16 through Corinth Films.  The movie, which runs less than 90 minutes, is worth watching at least once.  That is due in part to its story, which will be discussed shortly.  The movie’s cinematography does its own part to make the presentation worth watching, too.  It will be discussed a little later.  The movie’s soundtrack rounds out its most important elements.  When it is considered along with the movie’s story and cinematography, the whole makes Mambo Man a presentation that holds its own against other statement films.

Tumi Productions and Corinth Films’ presentation of Mambo Man is an intriguing addition to this year’s field of new independent movies.  It is a work that is worth watching at least once.  That is due in part to its story.  The story in question focuses on JC (Hector Noas – El Comisario, Corazon Azul, Terre Indigo), a farmer, promoter and all around hustler who has driven his family to the brink of financial ruin with his spending habits.  Even with the success of his pig farm and promoting, JC has spent much of his time in recent years living beyond his means.  The story opens with that behavior having caught up with him.  The thing is that the extent of his financial mismanagement is not fully revealed until he tells his wife about a scheme presented to him by his old friend Roberto (David Parez).  The scheme involves JC buying some jewelry from a woman who wants to allegedly raise money to join her family in the United States.  JC’s wife reveals to audiences in the discussion with him, that the majority of his ventures have failed and that if his plan in this case fails, it means complete bankruptcy for the family and having to sell their house.  All of this sounds like it could be used for a comedy.  As a matter of fact it has been used for a comical take on the familiar theme.  In this case though, the featured story is much heavier emotionally.  This is where the movie becomes somewhat difficult to watch.  Rather than taking a light hearted approach, the writing team of Mo Fini and Paul Morris has crafted a story that leaves viewers feeling so uncomfortable throughout.  Even when the story reaches its bittersweet ending (no, the ending will not be spoiled here), it tugs at viewers’ heartstrings.  The result of all of this is that viewers will find that they have to really be in the right mindset in order to really enjoy the story.  That means it is not one of those stories that audiences will find themselves willingly watching any time.  Of course that is not to say that the movie is a failure.  It just is not a presentation that viewers will find themselves watching a lot.

While the story featured in Mambo Man is something of a mixed bag in terms of its  presentation, the movie’s cinematography works well to make up for the story’s shortcoming.  According to information provided through IMDB, Mambo Man was filmed entirely on site at locations throughout Cuba.  This means that the lush countryside locations and the busy city streets of Santiago de Cub and Bayamo are in fact those locations.  The vast differences in the settings and the rich colors and general appearance of each location make for so much visual engagement and entertainment.  What’s more, the angles and simple shot styles bring out the best of those settings.  Case in point is the roadside café at which JC stops late in the story.   .  The almost primitive roadside café in one shot – which is essentially a series of thatch huts – looks so wonderful thanks to the angles and lighting.  On another hand, the streets of Santiago de Cub are so rich in their color, from the streets themselves to the colors of the store fronts and houses.  It is all captured and highlighted so well through the work of those behind the lenses.  If for no other reason than the ability of those behind the cameras to so effectively capture the natural beauty of Cuba, viewers will want to watch this movie.  Just as enjoyable to take in throughout the movie is its soundtrack.

The soundtrack to Mambo Man is important to address because of the aesthetic enjoyment that it additionally brings to the movie’s presentation.  Music from the likes of Afro-Cuban All-Stars, Arturo Jorge, and Candido Fabre highlights the music that has become synonymous with the island nation throughout its history.  The catchy rhythms of the sambas and jazz-tinged sounds of other songs work with the soundtrack’s other sounds, and the movie’s wonderful cinematography to even more bring the movie to life.   When those aesthetic elements are joined with the story, whose basis is itself believable enough, the movie in whole proves itself worth watching at least once.

Tumi Productions and Corinth Films’ presentation of Mambo Man is an intriguing work that drama fans will find worth watching at least once.  That is due in part to its story.  The story, while very heavy in the manner in which it is presented, presents a matter that can and does happen in reality.  That believability makes for its own share of engagement and entertainment.  The cinematography exhibited in Mambo Man stands out throughout the story.  The use of certain angles, filters, and lighting does so well to bring to life, the sights and sounds of Cuba.  Just as the cinematography makes the viewing experience more enjoyable in this case, so does the movie’s soundtrack.  This element presents some of the modern and traditional music of Cuba in one presentation.  Each item noted is important in its own way to the whole of the movie’s presentation.  All things considered, they make Mambo Man proves itself to be not an easy movie to watch, but still worth watching at least once.  It is available now.

More information on this and other titles from Corinth Films is available along with the studio’s latest news at:

Websitehttps://corinthfilms.com

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/corinthfilms1977

Twitterhttps://twitter.com/corinthfilms

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Corinth Films Announces ‘The Interrogation’ Domestic Release Date

Courtesy: Corinth Films

Independent movie studio Corinth Films will bring a new story from WWII to American audiences next month.

The studio is scheduled to release its new movie The Interrogation on DVD on March 23. The story featured in the movie centers on the autobiography of the infamous Auschwitz camp commandant Rudolf Hoss. It follows his interrogation by Albert Piotrowski prior to his hanging for the heinous acts that he oversaw at Auschwitz.

Following the fall of the Nazi empire in 1945, Allied forces hunted down members of the party and convicted them before executing them for their crimes. Hoss was discovered by British troops, hiding out in Gottrupel, Germany, disguised as a gardener. His location was revealed by his own wife, who said she turned him in over concern over the safety of the couple’s son.

The Interrogation originally premiered in 2016 in its home nation of Israel. It was helmed by Israel-born director Erez Pery. The movie’s trailer is streaming here.

More information on this and other titles from Corinth Films is available along with the studio’s latest news at:

Website: https://corinthfilms.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/corinthfilms1977

Twitter: https://twitter.com/corinthfilms

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Corinth Films Resurrecting Einstein Documentary

Courtesy: Corinth Films

Independent movie studio Corinth Films is set to release a vintage documentary about legendary physicist Albert Einstein next month.

Einsteins Universe is scheduled for release Aug. 25 on Blu-ray/DVD combo pack and digital.  It marks the first time that the vintage documentary, based on author Nigel Caulder’s biography by the same name, has received a home release on any platform.

It originally premiered on television on March 14, 1979 in celebration of what would have been Einstein’s 100th birthday.  The broadcast was made possible through a partnership between the BBC and WGBH (America’s leading public television network).

Peter Ustinov — SpartacusLogan‘s RunDeath on the Nile — narrated the original broadcast.  As part of the documentary, Ustinov visited the University of Texas-Austin McDonald Observatory in his quest to learn about Einstein and the significance of his work.  He learns about topics, such as Einstein’s general theory of relativity, the “Doppler Effect,” and how the universe was formed.

The documentary’s run time is 118 minutes.  A trailer for the documentary is streaming here.

More information on this and other titles from Corinth Films is available at:

 

Websitehttp://www.corinthfilms.com

Facebookhttp://www.facebook.como/CorinthFilms1977

Twitterhttp://twitter.com/corinthfilms

 

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and ‘Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Dramedy, Drama Fans Will “Care” About ‘The Carer’

Courtesy: Corinth Films

Prequels, sequels, reboots, and overly embellished movies that are based on actual events are the cash crops of American cinema now days.  They have been the moneymakers for American studios for many years, too, and that is truly a sad thing.  The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has only served to make things worse for studios and audiences, as it has dramatically reduced the amount of content from which audiences have to choose.  Thankfully independent studio Corinth Films presented American audiences with an impressive new offering Tuesday in the form of the dramedy import The Carer.  This 90-minute presentation is a work that will appeal to theater lovers as well as those who have an appreciation for dramedies and just good acting.  That item – the acting – will be discussed later, as it plays its own part in the movie’s success.  The story at the movie’s heart serves as its foundation.  It will be discussed shortly.  There is only one real negative to address here, the bonus content, or rather the lack thereof.  This will be addressed a little later, too.  Each noted item is important in its own way to the whole of The Carer.  All things considered, they make The Carer a movie about which many audiences will and should care.

More than four years have passed since Corinth Films’ British import The Carer made its theatrical debut in its home nation of the United Kingdom.  It begs the question why it took such a long time for this successful cinematic offering to make its way to the United States.  The reason is unknown by this critic.  That aside, it is still very much a movie that many American audiences will appreciate.  That is due in no small part to the movie’s story.  The story in question finds its main characters – Golden Globe Award-winning actor Brian Cox (X2: XMen United, Adaptation, Super Troopers) and Coco Konig (Assassins Creed, To The Boats, Die Rauber) – as the pairing of Sir Michael Gifford and his live-in caretaker Dorottya respectively.  Gifford is suffering from Parkinson’s Disease, and Dorottya comes in to care for him as he is unable to care for himself.  As the friendship between the pair grows, so does the divide between Gifford and his daughter Sophia (Emilia Fox – The Pianist, Dorian Gray, Cashback).  Eventually, the father-daughter relationship is healed.  How that happens will be left for audiences to find out for themselves.  What is even better about the relationship between Dorottya and Gifford is that the writing team of Gilbert Adair, Janos Edelenyi, and Tom Kinninmont did not let that relationship become anything more than that friendship of the aged experienced person and what was essentially his apprentice of sorts.  It is no stretch to say that any American screen/script writer would have had no qualms with taking such connection and trying to turn it into an unnecessary romance story.  The noted trio of writers is to be highly commended for taking that easy way out.  It made the relationship between Gifford and Dorottya deeper and richer.   Given, the plot element of the old lion refusing to go quietly into that good night as he works to pass on his knowledge and “legacy” to the next generation is nothing new to the movie industry on either side of the Atlantic.  That aside, the approach to that familiar plot element taken here keeps it unique in its own fashion with the result that the story becomes well worth experiencing.

The relationship between Gifford and Dorottya is just one of the matters that makes the story work as well as it does.  Gifford’s relationship with Sophia and Milly, his longtime companion (Anna Chancellor – What A Girl Wants, The Hithchiker’s Guide To The Galaxy, Four Weddings and a Funeral) adds to the interest.  It is actually thanks to his friendship with Dorottya that Giifford’s relationship with Milly is strengthened.  Not to give away too much, but that story has a happy ending, too.  The emotional strain that they go through as they watch Gifford, a man who they love and respect in their own way, succumb to the ravages of Parkinson’s disease will draw in viewers just as much as the noted relationship between himself and Dorottya.  That includes anyone who has or has had a family member who suffered from the terrible neurological disease.  The way that this storyline interweaves with the central plot involving Gifford and Dorottya’s friendship makes this overall central story line such that it ensures viewers’ engagement and entertainment.

One final note in regards to the story is that the story’s end is happy, but the writers do not make it painfully obvious as to how the happy ending will happen.  Even as that ending (which will not be revealed for those who have not watch the movie) is revealed, the writers manage to largely avoid all of the tropes that so many American writers use with dramedies and dramas.  It keeps the story (and characters) endearing for audiences, ensuring that much more, viewers’ engagement and enjoyment.  Between this and the story’s other elements, the story overall becomes clearly a solid foundation for The Carer’s presentation.

The story at the heart of The Carer does a lot to make this British import well worth the watch.  Again, the story overall is not entirely unique, but does still hold its own identity against its counterparts on both sides of the Atlantic.  For all that it does to make the viewing experience here positive, the minimal bonus content proves slightly detrimental to that experience.

The only bonus content featured with the new domestic presentation of The Carer is a brief one-minute-plus look back at the movie’s premiere at the Toronto Film Festival in 2016.  A few of the people who watched that premiere were interviewed following the screening.  One of the viewers talks about the movie’s finale.  Another makes mention of the story’s depth in terms of its story.  That is the extent that audiences get in terms of anyone talking about the movie.  It would have been nice to have heard from the cast to receive their thoughts on items, such as why they chose to take part in the movie, what they thought of the final product, and their favorite part of making the movie.  Another item that would have been nice to have taken in was any discussion on the shooting locations, considering the wonderful backdrops for each scene.  Not having all of this extra does detract from the movie’s viewing experience, but it does not do so to the point that said experience fails.  It is just a negative that cannot be ignored.  Making up quite well for that one negative is the work of the movie’s cast.

Cox, whose resume is extensive in its own right, is that of a seasoned professional.  The chemistry between the himself and Konig is so obvious from one scene to the next.  The subtle way in which Cox brings Gifford around as Gifford’s relationship with Dorottya grows is so powerful in its own right.  It would have been so easy for him to just ham it up and go over the top, but he did not go that route.  That is especially considering that Cox is playing an aged thespian/actor.  Rather watching him on screen, it would be just as easy to see Cox performing this same role on a stage.  His performance is right up there with the best works of fellow famed actor Sir Patrick Stewart.  Honestly, one could see Stewart in the role just as much as Cox, all things considered.  Regardless, casting Cox was just as much the right choice as Stewart would have been had he tried out for the role.

Going back to Konig, the up-and-coming actress’ own performance is enjoyable to take in, in its own right.  One moment in the story finds her having to firmly correct Gifford about her nationality.  That is a key moment as it showed her control.  Rather than doing the standard waterworks bit that so many actresses do in similar style scenes, she just stands her ground as she shows her frustration with Gifford.  It shows Dorottya as a confident woman and carer who will not let herself be bullied and pushed around.  It really is the moment when her friendship with her “mentor” really starts to grow.  Her performance in that moment is to be highly commended.  Another applause-worthy moment in which Konig shines comes as Dorottya is searching for the hospital where Gifford is being kept after his health scare.  No, that story element will not be revealed either.  Rather than doing the overly emotional, teary-eyed bit that so many actresses do in such situations, she maintains her composure and confidence, even going so far as to fake being one of Gifford’s family members.  It is just another great moment that serves to highlight Dorottya’s confidence.  The result of such performance is that she becomes a character that female viewers will appreciate just as much as any viewer who is tired of all of the tearjerker acts that so many actresses conduct in dramas and dramedies.  No doubt, such performance should help Konig as her career continues.  When her performance and that of Cox is considered along with the performances of the story’s supporting cast, the whole of those performances works with the movie’s central story to make the viewing experience that much more enthralling for audiences.  The result of that overall positive impact is a presentation that makes The Carer a welcome option for audiences.  It is a movie that audiences would welcome even if movie studios and theaters were not impacted by everything happening around the world for that matter.

Corinth Films’ British import The Carer may not necessarily be a new offering in the purest sense of the word.  It originally made its debut overseas four years ago, and only made its domestic debut this year.  To that end it is still “new” for American audiences, and keeping that in mind, it is a welcome new cinematic offering for American audiences, considering the impact that the COVID-19 pandemic has had on studios here in the U.S.  That is proven in part through its story, which while not necessarily unique at its core, is still unique in its execution.  The work of its cast works with the story to more than make up for the lack of any real worthwhile bonus content on the movie’s new DVD release.  Keeping all of this in mind, The Carer is a presentation about which any dramedy and drama fans will themselves care.  It is available now.

More information on this and other titles from Corinth Films is available at:

 

Websitehttp://www.corinthfilms.com

Facebookhttp://www.facebook.como/CorinthFilms1977

Twitterhttp://twitter.com/corinthfilms

 

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and ‘Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Corinth Films Bringing Its 2016 Dramedy ‘The Carer’ To American Audiences

Courtesy: Corinth Films

Corinth Films’ dramedy The Carer will make it domestic debut next month on DVD and digital.

The studio is bringing its movie The Carer to American audiences July 14.  The British import dramedy premiered in the United Kingdom in 2016.  It stars .Golden Globe Award winning actor Brian Cox (X2XMen UnitedAdaptationSuper Troopers) in the lead role as ailing theatrical legend Sir Michael Gifford.  Gifford is suffering from a a rare form of Parkinson’s Disease.

As a result of his condition, Gifford is in need of someone to help him on a daily basis.  Enter Dorottya (Coco Konig — Assassin’s CreedTo The BoatsDie Rauber) an aspiring Hungarian stage actress, as Gifford’s carer.  She hopes that in caring for Gifford, her career can get a boost.  Things between the pair start off rough, but their friendship eventually grows.

While the duo’s friendship grows, the around the pair become dubious of Dorottya’s real intentions.  This ultimately leads to a confrontation between Gifford and his scheming daughter Sophia (Emilia Fox — The PianistDorian GrayCashback), who is trying to keep her father from what could be his last on-stage appearance, a ceremony held by the Critics Guild of Great Britain.  The organization is set to present him with a Lifetime Achievement Award.

The sense of purpose and life that Dorottya has instilled in Gifford comes even more into play as this confrontation builds, leading to the story’s finale.

The Carer also stars Anna Chancellor (Four Weddings and a FuneralPennywothTrust) and Karl Johnson (Hot FuzzThe IllusionistThe Death of Stalin).  Sir Roger Moore (MoonrakerThe Spy Who Loved MeThe Man With The Golden Gun) also makes an appearance in the movie.

Cox was nominated for a BAFTA (British Academy of Film and Television Awards) prize for Best Actor in 2016 when the movie originally premiered in the United Kingdom for his role in the movie, which was directed by Janos Edelenyi (Prima PrimaveraThe Long ShadowKasztner’s Ark).

The Carer‘s run time is 89 minutes.  It will retail for MSRP of $24.95.  More information on this and other titles from Corinth Films is available at:

 

Website: http://www.corinthfilms.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.como/CorinthFilms1977

Twitter: http://twitter.com/corinthfilms

 

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and ‘Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.