OneRepublic Partners With Eagle Rock Entertainment For New Live Recording

Courtesy: Eagle Rock Entertainment

OneRepublic  has a new live recording on the way.

The band announced Wednesday that it has partnered with Eagle Rock Entertainment to release its next live recording Live in South Africa on Saturday, Feb. 23.  The recording will be available on Blu-ray and digital platforms.

Blu-ray pre-orders are open now here.  The recording’s teaser trailer is streaming online now here.

Live in South Africa was recorded at The Ticketpro Dome (formerly the Coca-Cola Dome) during the final leg of the band’s Native World Tour, which was in support of the band’s third full-length studio recording Native.  The concert includes a number of the band’s fan favorite songs including, but not limited to ‘Counting Stars,’ ‘Apologize,’ ‘All The Right Moves’ and ‘If I Lose Myself’ among many others.

Along with its main feature, Live in South Africa also offers audiences an all-access documentary that follows the band’s rise to worldwide fame and thoughts from the band’s members as they contemplate their futures and that of the band.  Also included as a bonus is a performance of ‘Wherever I Go,’ which was performed live at Sydney Harbour in Sydney, Australia.

More information on Live in South Africa is available online along with all of OneRepublic’s latest news and more at:

Website: http://www.onerepublic.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/OneRepublic

Twitter: http://twitter.com/OneRepublic

 

More information on this and other titles from Eagle Rock Entertainment is available online now at:

 

Website: http://www.eagle-rock.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/EagleRockEnt

Twitter: http://twitter.com/EagleRockNews

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

 

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‘Sticky Fingers Live at The Fonda Theatre 2015’ Is Sure To “Stick” In Any Rock Aficionado’s Music Library

Courtesy: Eagle Rock Entertainment

Eagle Rock Entertainment opened its “vaults” again this past September and pulled another archived concert from The Rolling Stones for audiences. The concert in question is the band’s landmark performance of its seminal 1971 album Sticky Fingers at the Fonda Theatre. Originally recorded May 20, 2015, this concert marked the first time that the band had performed the album live in its entirety. Needless to say, the concert, held in what feels like such an intimate setting, is a memorable experience. That is especially the case with its recent home release considering how much extra audiences get with the concert’s home release. That will be discussed shortly. The band’s performance of its set strengthens the recording’s presentation even more. The liner notes that come with the recording put the finishing touch to its presentation. Each noted element plays its own important part to the recording’s presentation. All things considered, they make this recording another gem from the band’s (and Eagle Rock’s) vaults.

The Rolling Stones’ Sticky Fingers Live at the Fonda Theatre 2015 is yet another welcome gem from the band’s vaults and those of Eagle Rock Entertainment, who included this concert as part of its ongoing “From The Vault” Rolling Stones concert series. The series has already seen the release of at least five previous live recordings — L.A. Forum 1975, London Marquee Club 1971, Hampton Coliseum 1981, Leeds Roundhay Park 1982 and Tokyo Dome 1990. This sixth addition to the series offers just as much to appreciate as its predecessors beginning with its very presentation. The concert, as its title implies, features the band performing Sticky Fingers in its entirety live for the first time. That in itself is enough reason for the band’s most devout fans to add this recording to their collections. Of course it is only one part of what makes the presentation so enjoyable. Along with the album’s full live presentation, audiences also get performances of two other Stones’ fan favorites, ‘Start Me Up’ and ‘Jumpin’ Jack Flash’ alongside takes of B.B. King’s ‘Rock Me Baby’ and Otis Redding’s ‘Can’t Turn You Loose’ (which was made famous by Universal Pictures’ hit 1980 movie The Blues Brothers). In all, audiences get here a 16-song, 79-minute set that is certainly one of its most memorable. It should be noted that while Sticky Fingers is presented in whole here, the album is not presented in the same chronological order as the album itself. Nor are the set’s orders on its Blu-ray/DVD and CD platform. Why this is the case is anyone’s guess. Regardless, audiences still get the same concert on each platform. That being the case, the set list alone does plenty to make this concert a joy. It is only one part of the recording’s presentation that is to be noted. The one-on-on interviews that are interwoven into the concert are just as worth noting as the set.

There are those who have criticized this recording because it weaves the band’s one-on-one interviews, arguing that they take away from the concert’s continuity. That could not be farther from the truth. If anything, they add to that fluidity. Audiences gain quite a bit of insight through the interviews, including the realization that front man Mick Jagger being “uptight” about so many of Sticky Fingers‘ songs being so slow and brooding while guitarist Ron Wood welcomes that vibe. Ironically, Wood also jokes about his nervousness about putting forth the best possible content for audiences, saying he gets nervous about “every riff…every solo.” There’s even a discussion on who modeled for famed artist Andy Warhol *yes, that Andy Warhol) as he developed the album’s cover art. The discussion on ‘I Got The Blues’ that is certain to get audiences talking plenty themselves as each of the band’s members discuss the song’s extremely slow tempo. Wood says of its tempo that it is “a lesson in control” while drummer Charlie Watts said the tempo is “a bugger to hold down.” Lead guitarist Keith Richards said of the song’s tempo that it is “a charm,” adding he especially appreciated the song’s horn part. There is also a slight tribute to the band’s former saxophone player Bobby Keys, who passed away in 2014 in the interviews. These are just some examples of the insight offered through the concert’s companion interviews. In all honesty, one struggles to see how the interviews would come across in their own standalone presentation. Considering this, the interviews work much better in conjunction with the concert than so many would have people believe. Keeping all of this in mind, the concert presented here and its companion interviews go a long way toward making the recording in whole so enjoyable. They are collectively only one part of what makes the recording’s presentation so enjoyable. The band’s performance throughout the concert adds even more to that presentation.

The band’s performance throughout the course of its concert adds just as much to its presentation as the show’s set list and the band’s interviews. From start to finish, Jagger’s trademark charisma and swagger is on full display. He works the crowd nonstop like a ringmaster. This is especially notable as the band works its way through ‘Brown Sugar.’ Watts meanwhile solidly keeps the band in time with his work behind the kit. Bassist Darryl Jones continues to deliver a solid low-end while working expertly alongside Watts to keep each song moving. Sax player Karl Denson puts on his own inspiring performance as he blasts out his solo on ‘Can’t You Hear Me Knocking.’ He just lets his part flow so naturally there. On the exact opposite end, his flute part in ‘Moonlight Mile’ is just as impressive in its subtlety. Richards puts on his own show, keeping audiences entertained with his own guitar work, too. Between their performances and those of the other performers, the whole of the group puts on a show that home viewers will enjoy just as much as those who were in attendance at the concert’s recording. Keeping this in mind, the group’s performance is still not the last of the recording’s most important elements. The liner notes crafted in the recording put the final touch on its presentation.

The recording’s liner notes, crafted by Richard Havers, offer plenty of insight in their own right to the concert. Havers notes in his notes the importance of Sticky Fingers to The Rolling Stones’ history alongside a near song-by song summary of the show’s set list with history behind the songs. He spends ample time discussing ‘Sister Morphine, which because of its history, led it to become one of the band’s most rarely performed songs in a live setting. There is even a discussion on Bobby Key’s place in rock history and the band’s own history in Havers’ notes. Havers states in his notes that Denson expertly recreates Keys’ original sax line from ‘Can’t You Hear Me Knocking’ on his own performance in the song. Between these and so many other discussions included throughout the recording’s companion booklet, the insight offered throughout does more than enough to make them critical in their own right to the recording’s whole. When that importance is considered along with the importance of the band’s performance, the concert’s set list and its companion band interviews, the whole of the noted elements makes Sticky Fingers Live at The Fonda Theatre 2015 a work that Rolling Stones fans and rock fans alike will appreciate.

The Rolling Stones’ Sticky Fingers Live at The Fonda Theatre 2015, which is also the latest addition to Eagle Rock’s ongoing “From The Vault” live recording series, is yet another shining gem from that series that will shine just as brightly in any Rolling Stones’ collection. The same can be said of its place in rock aficionados’ collections. The combination of its set list and its bonus one-on-one interviews about each song with the band’s members joins with the band’s performance of said songs to offer audiences a truly memorable performance. The liner notes included in the recording’s companion booklet add their own touch to the whole of the recording’s presentation. Each element is important in its own right, as has been noted already. All things considered, they make Sticky Fingers Live at The Fonda Theatre 2015 a recording that is certain to “stick” in audiences’ music libraries for a long time. More information on this recording is available along with all of the band’s latest news and more at:

Website: http://www.rollingstones.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/therollingstones

Twitter: http://twitter.com/RollingStones

More information on this and other titles from Eagle Rock Entertainment is available online now at:

Website: http://www.eagle-rock.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/EagleRockEnt

Twitter: http://twitter.com/EagleRockNews

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Black Sabbath’s Final Concert Proves Its Legacy Will Never “End”

Courtesy: Eagle Rock Entertainment

Black Sabbath is easily one of the most important and influential acts in the modern history of rock. For almost half a century, the British hard rock outfit entertained audiences the world over and influenced countless other acts. That is even with the band’s numerous lineup change throughout the years. This past February, the band — with 3/4 of its original lineup sans drummer BIll Ward — brought that hugely successful decades-long career to an end when it performed its last live concert ever. Recorded Feb. 4, 2017 in Birmingham, England, the city where the band originally formed in 1968, this concert insures that while Black Sabbath may have finally reached its end, its legacy will never end. Now thanks to Eagle Rock Entertainment, that concert has been made available to the masses on a number of platforms in the form of Black Sabbath: The End. Released Nov. 17, 2017 — a little more than nine months after the concert was originally recorded (yes, there’s a bad joke there) — this final recording from one of rock’s most important names is a lasting statement from the band. That is due in part to the concert’s set list, which will be discussed shortly. The concert’s collective cinematography and editing play into that statement just as much as the concert’s set list. They will be discussed later. The concert’s bonus material rounds out its most important elements. Each element is important in its own right to the recording’s whole. All things considered, Black Sabbath: The End proves to be a powerful and enjoyable final statement from Black Sabbath should it in fact mark the true final end for this landmark band.

Black Sabbath’s last ever concert together (or so the band claims, considering that it has broken up and re-formed so many times over nearly 50 years) is an important piece of music history for Black Sabbath fans and rock fans alike. That is especially the case if in fact it truly does mark “the end” for what is one of the most important and influential acts in rock’s modern history. The recording offers audiences plenty to appreciate beginning with its extensive set list. The 19-song set list pulls from the band’s first seven albums. Paranoid, the band’s sophomore album, gets the most nods in this set with six of its songs included in the show. The band’s fourth album, the fittingly titled Vol. 4, gets the second most nods with four songs while Master of Reality and its self-titled 1970 debut are represented with three songs each. Sabbath Bloody Sabbath, Sabotage and Technical Ecstasy each got one nod in this set, again totaling the set list at 19 songs. It’s interesting to note that the band didn’t reach back into its eighth studio album Never Say Die for this set considering it was the last time that the original lineup recorded together and the last time that Ozzy would record with the band until 2013’s 13. That album was iconic if only for those elements, not to mention the songs themselves. Regardless, the set list that is presented here is a solid representation of the original Black Sabbath’s initial run together and is certain to impress audiences of all ages due to that fact alone.

Just as important to note of the set as the songs is their sequencing. Audiences will note in examining the set list a little bit deeper that the band never stays on one album for too long throughout the show. The set list opens by reaching back to the band’s debut album before moving into its second and fourth album for its first four songs. That fourth album (Vol. 4) makes up the set’s third and fourth song. The band goes backward to its third album, Master of Reality for a couple of songs from there before moving back to Vol. 4 again and then back again to Paranoid and Black Sabbath again. The band’s later albums don’t come along until later in the set. Simply put, throughout the course of the show’s set list, the band does an admirable job of keeping things moving instead of just sticking to one album. That constant variety in the songs strengthens the set list even more, and showing even more in turn the importance of the concert’s set list. Of course the set list is only one part of what makes this recording so impressive. The recording’s collective cinematography and editing add another touch to its presentation.

The collective cinematography and editing displayed throughout The End are so important to note in examining the concert’s overall presentation because of how much they add to the experience. Thanks to the work of those behind the cameras and computers, audiences get an experience that is not just another run-of-the-mill concert experience. It truly is a cinematic concert experience complete with triple monitor shots, impressive visual effects — including mix effects that take viewers from one camera to another — and camera angles that take audiences on stage with the band and deep into the crowd. The crowd shots let home viewers see what those in attendance saw, making the experience feel even more real while the on-stage shots take audiences up close and personal with the band. The cuts are handled expertly throughout the show, serving even more to illustrate the songs’ varied energies and in turn, heighten the experience even more. Given, those cuts are at time dizzying in their speed and angles, but they still go a long way toward enhancing the experience even more.

The result of the concert’s editing in post is an audio mix that that sounds just as great with a standard monitor set to “music” as with a home theater system. No one part ever overpowers the other at any point. That includes even the crowd noise. That attention to balance does so much to fully capture the immensity of the venue while also capturing just as well the concert’s sound. As has been noted so many times before, understanding and appreciating that work can only happen when audiences buy this recording and experiencing it for themselves. Audiences who see the show for themselves will agree in noting these elements that the concert’s cinematography and editing go a long way toward making it such an impressive presentation along with the set list. Even as important as both elements are to the concert, they still are not the last of its most important elements. The bonus in-studio footage included in the recording rounds out its most important elements.

The in-studio footage included in the recording’s presentation takes audiences into the intimate setting as Ozzy and company re-record some of the band’s most well-known hits, including the rare b-side ‘Wicked World’ and the beautifully pained ballad ‘Changes,’ which allegedly was about former drummer Bill Ward’s divorce from his first wife. ‘Wicked World’ was a b-side from the band’s 1970 eponymous debut that was only included in the album’s American edition, but not European edition. European fans would eventually get that song though, when the album was re-issued in 1996 and again in 2009. ‘Sweet Leaf,’ which is a pretty self-explanatory song, ‘The Wizard’ and ‘Tomorrow’s Dream’ are all enjoyable to experience in-studio, too. When these performances are coupled with the recording’s main feature, they bring the recording’s total song count to 24. So not only do audiences get two dozen Black Sabbath songs in this recording, but they get an extensive live experience (the band’s possibly last ever) and a more intimate in-studio experience. That duality coupled with the extensive overall set list, makes for an experience overall that is a powerful final statement from Black Sabbath. Add in the expert cinematography and editing, and audiences get in this recording, a work that will make certain while Black Sabbath has met its end, it will never fully be the end for this band’s legacy.

Black Sabbath’s last-ever live performance recorded this past February in Birmingham, England marked the end of an era for the rock and music community in whole. The concert’s home release via Eagle Rock Entertainment makes certain though, that the band’s legacy will never end. That is proven through an extensive set list that covers nearly every one of the original Black Sabbath’s original albums. The concert’s expert cinematography and editing strengthen its presentation even more. The bonus in-studio recordings expand the recording’s set list even more while also giving audiences an in-studio experience that is enjoyable in its own right alongside the recording’s live side. One really would be remiss to ignore the recording’s liner notes, written by Rolling Stone magazine writer Kory Grow as the recording’s presentation. Grow’s liner notes add their own special touch to the whole of the recording, too. When all of these items are set alongside one another, the end result is a powerful new recording from Black Sabbath and an equally powerful possibly last statement from one of the music community’s most important acts. It is available now in stores and online. More information on The End is available along with all of the band’s latest news and more at:

Website: http://www.blacksabbath.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/BlackSabbath

Twitter: http://twitter.com/officialsabbath

More information on this and other titles from Eagle Rock Entertainment is available online now at:

Website: http://www.eagle-rock.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/EagleRockEnt

Twitter: http://twitter.com/EagleRockNews

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Eagle Rock Entertainment Unveils New Buddy Holly Doc

Courtesy: Eagle Rock Entertainment

Eagle Rock Entertainment today released a special new recording for fans of Buddy Holly.

Rave On: The Buddy Holly Story was officially released today exclusively on digital platforms. Produced by 1515 Productions, this feature examines the life and career of the legendary musician. It does this through interviews with those closest to Holly as well as some of his most devout fans. Some of the famed figures interviewed for the project include: Jerry Allison (one of the original members of The Crickets), Queen guitarist Brian May, Buddy’s brothers Larry and Travis, Buddy’s widow Maria Elena Holly and others.

Holly is known as an innovator in the pop music world because his compositions broke the pop music barriers of the time, going beyond the blues-based influences that it had used up until then. The approach taken by Holly and his band mates in The Crickets led to the group releasing such hits as ‘Peggy Sue,’ ‘That’ll Be The Day’ and ‘Everyday’ among so many others.

Holly lost his life in a plane crash in February 1959 near Clear Lake, IA. Richie Valens and J.P. Richardson (A.K.A. The Big Bopper) were also killed in the crash along with the plane’s pilot, Roger Peterson. The fatal incident became known nationwide as “The Day The Music Died.”

More information on Rave On: The Buddy Holly Story and other titles from Eagle Rock Entertainment is available online now at:

Website: http://www.eagle-rock.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/EagleRockEnt

Twitter: http://twitter.com/EagleRockNews

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

The Who’s First Ever ‘Tommy’ Full Concert Will Impress Rock Fans Of All Ages

Courtesy: Eagle Rock Entertainment

In late spring of 1969, rock band The Who released what has since become one of the most beloved and important albums in its extensive catalogue when it released Tommy. the 24-song, 75-minute opus was a dramatic turning point for the band because it was at a point in its life at which it was growing in age and maturity, and thus trying to stay relevant. Those changes, along with discussions among the band and its management, led to the creation of Tommy. While the band toured extensively between 1969 and 1970 in support of the album, it never actually performed that now seminal record in whole in one setting. This past April, almost 48 years after Tommy first debuted, the band performed the landmark album in full for the first time at London’s Royal Albert Hall, one of the world’s most iconic live venues. The facility has played host to everything from the 10th Anniversary performance of Les Miserables to Eric Clapton to Heart and so many other events and acts. Now thanks to Eagle Rock Entertainment, audiences of all ages will finally get to experience this first time performance from The Who on multiple platforms including DVD, Blu-ray and digital. It goes without saying that this recording is one that classic rock fans and those of The Who will equally appreciate this recording, and not only for the sake of the set list, the central point of the recording. The band’s performance here is just as important to discuss in examining the recording as the set list itself. The recording’s bonus material rounds out its most important elements. Each element is important in its own right to the recording’s whole. All things considered, the recording in whole proves to be an excellent addition to the library of any fan of The Who and any classic rock aficionado.

Tommy Live at the Royal Albert Hall is a recording that classic rock fans and fans of The Who alike will want to have in their music libraries. It is hardly the band’s first live recording or the first live recording of its type from any band or group. Despite all that, it still proves itself a recording that rock fans across the board will appreciate. That is due in part to the set list. It has already been stated that this show was primarily a performance of The Who’s seminal concept album Tommy. While the concert was primarily the band’s first-time ever performance of that album, the band doesn’t focus solely on Tommy. Along with that album’s whole, the band also includes seven encores after the fact. The encores aren’t just random songs, either, but even more of the band’s biggest numbers. They include the timeless ‘Baba O’Riley,’ ‘I Can See For Miles,’ ‘Who Are You’ and others. The inclusion of those extra numbers shows that the band didn’t want to just present the one album in this show, but to give its audiences something more, almost as a way of saying thank you to the audience for coming out and packing the center. The fact that the concert was performed all as a benefit for the Teenage Cancer Trust, which helps young people diagnosed with cancer, makes the whole thing that much more enjoyable and endearing. Of course even with this in mind, the show’s set list is just one of the recording’s key elements. The band’s performance of said list is just as important to discuss as the set list itself.

The band’s performance of Tommy shows that while Pete Townshend and Roger Daltry are getting up there in age, there is seemingly no sign of slowing or stopping for the longtime friends and band mates. The men, along with fellow musicians Zak Starkey, Simon Townshend, John Corey, Loren Gold and Frank Simes, give their all in each song. The result of that collective effort is a performance that will keep home viewers just as engaged as those who were in attendance at the concert’s taping early this year. The band uses minimal visual aid in its performance, too, opting for simple visuals on a screen versus any amount of pyro or anything else to heighten the show’s energy. This minimalist approach allows the band to put its talents on full display, with a great result, too — a result that reminds audiences why The Who is, collectively, still today, one of the most respected names in the music community. From Townshend’s propeller-like guitar playing to Daltry’s continued ability to vocally soar and even the timekeeping and more, there is so much talent on display. When that talent is coupled with the very fact that this performance is the band’s first time ever performing Tommy live in whole as a whole band, the two elements serve to make this recording well worth the watch by themselves. Of course, one would be remiss to ignore the bonus material included with the recording, as it presents its own importance.

Audiences learn through the recording’s bonus behind-the-scenes material that rehearsals for the band’s Royal Albert Hall concert took nearly a month (three weeks to be exact), and took place at a very well-known British studio were some major movies and TV shows were recorded. Viewers also learn through this roughly 10 – 15 minute featurette the band’s charity roots and why it works so diligently with various charities. The revelation is certain to move anyone who might have otherwise not known these pieces of information. There is also some light-hearted commentary from Roger Daltry about Tommy’s influence on him both personally and creatively that will enlighten and entertain audiences regardless of their familiarity with the band, its body of work and its history. These and other pieces of information included in the behind-the-scenes featurette make this item the recording’s central bonus material. The two music videos for ‘the Acid Queen’ and ‘Pinball Wizard’ are the proverbial icing on the cake, adding that final touch to its presentation. When all of this is set alongside the recording’s set list and the band’s performance thereof, the whole of these elements makes Tommy overall, a welcome addition to the personal music library of any classic rock aficionado and any fan of The Who. Tommy Live at the Royal Albert Hall is available now in stores and online. More information on this recording is available online now along with all of The Who’s latest news and more at:

Website: http://www.thewho.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/thewho

Twitter: http://twitter.com/TheWho

More information on this and other titles from Eagle Rock Entertainment is available online now at:

Website: http://www.eagle-rock.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/EagleRockEnt

Twitter: http://twitter.com/EagleRockNews

Too keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Sting Gives Audiences Plenty To Appreciate In His Latest Live Recording

Courtesy: Eagle Rock Entertainment

Veteran musician/actor Sting has been entertaining audiences the world over for the better part of four decades on the stage and screen. Over the course of that time, Sting (A.K.A. Gordon Thomas Matthew Sumner) has earned countless accolades and seemingly endless acclaim for his work. Now with the release of his latest live recording, Live at the Olympia Paris, Sting is certain to gain even more accolades and acclaim. That is because there is so much to say to the positive about this recording, released Nov. 10 via Eagle Rock Entertainment, beginning with the concert’s extensive set list. It will be discussed shortly. The bonus performances included with the main feature are just as important to discuss in examining the recording as the show’s main set list. The performance put on by Sting and company throughout the main set and bonus performances rounds out the recording’s most important elements. Each element is unquestionably important in its own right to the recording’s whole. All things considered, they make Live at the Olympia Paris truly more proof of why Sting is one of the music industry’s most respected names to this very day.

Live at the Olympia Paris, the latest live recording from veteran performer Sting is is proof positive of why he remains today one of the music industry’s most respected names. This recording presents plenty for audiences to appreciate beginning with its extensive set list. The concert’s 23-song main feature takes audiences all the way back to The Police’s 1978 debut record Outlandos d’Amour and all the way up to his most recent album, 2016’s 57th & 9th. While not every one of his 12 solo records was represented here or all four records from The Police, the set list still presents a healthy cross section of his career. Four of five records from the Police — Outlandos d’Amour, Reggatta de Blanc, Ghost in the Machine and Synchronicity — each get nods in this set list. Almost half of Sting’s 12 solo records — …Nothing Like The Sun,Ten Summoner’s Tales, Mercury Falling, Brand New Day and 57th & 9th — get nods in this set that also includes covers of songs from David Bowie and Bill Withers. 57th & 9th gets the most nods with a total of six songs while Ten Summoner’s Tales sees three of its songs featured. …Nothing Like The Sun gets two songs on the set list while Mercury Falling and Brand New Day each get two numbers. Would it have been possible to include one song from every one of his albums, both solo and as a member of The Police? The answer is yes, but that would have only put the set list at 16 songs. Not only that, but it would also have left little room and choice for multiple songs from that overall body of work. Keeping that in mind, having 21 songs pulled from nine albums (more than half of his overall body of work) is impressive to say the very least.

As if the cross section represented in this set list is not enough, its order is just as important to note. Audiences will note in examining the set list that it never spends too much time focusing on one album or another. The set’s first two songs are lifted from his days with The Police. From there, Sting and company jump to …Nothing Like The Sun (1987) for the third song before jumping all the way to 2016 and Sting’s latest album 57th & 9th for the next two songs. From there on out, the set list jumps back and forth throughout Sting’s career nonstop, again giving audiences a healthy representation of his work while also keeping the concert’s energy balanced throughout. That well-thought-out organization, couple with the very cross section presented in this set, shows clearly why the show’s set list is so critical to the recording’s whole. Even as important as it is to the recording, it is only one of the recording’s key elements. The bonus performances included in the recording are just as important to its whole as the main feature.

The bonus set list that is included with the concert features only one of Sting’s works — ‘Heading South on the Great North Road,’ which is taken from 57th & 9th, while the rest of the songs come from Sting’s son Joe Sumner and his band, The Last Bandaleros. This is key to note because it shows Sting giving his son the chance to tour with him while also developing his own identity and fan base from that of his dad. It’s basically a dual purpose scenario. What’s really interesting to note of the group’s songs is the stylistic differences and similarities between their compositions and those from Sting. ‘Take Me To It’ for instance boasts a distinctly bluesy composition while ‘Looking for Me, Looking for You’ presents a decidedly radio friendly pop arrangement that in its own right sounds similar to some of Sting’s works. At the same time, it does separate itself from his songs because of that sound. ‘I Don’t Want To Know’ meanwhile presents an arrangement that is rooted in a decidedly South of the Border sound. The other bonus songs present their own similarities and differences, too. Those similarities and differences generate plenty of appreciation for the group and even for Sumner in his own right. When those songs are set alongside the songs featured in the recording’s main feature, the whole of the two sets give audiences plenty to enjoy and appreciate. All in all, they are not the recording’s only key elements. The musicians’ performances round out the recording’s most important elements.

The groups’ performances of the recording’s set lists are important to discuss because, as with any act’s performance, are what makes or break the songs. Luckily for audiences, both groups shine in their respective performances. Drummer Josh Freese, who has made a name for himself playing with the likes of A Perfect Circle, The Vandals, Guns N’ Roses and others shines once again as he keeps time for Sting and company. Meanwhile guitarists Dominic and Rufus Miller both give their all along with Sting in each song, even in the set’s slower, more reserved moments. Hearing Sting casually interact with his French audience in its native tongue adds to his performance. That is because it shows a certain level of respect for the audience since he obviously didn’t just happen to say a few short phrases, but make full conversation with the audience. Even non-French-speaking audiences will agree that this minor detail adds so much to Sting’s performance as it creates respect for him by audiences. Between that and the energy put into each song’s performance, the groups’ performances go a long way toward making these performances al lthe more enjoyable. When one adds in the show’s separate and extensive set lists, they make the recording in whole another enjoyable addition to any Sting fan’s home library. That is the case even with the editing issues raised in the concert.

Sting’s latest live recording Live at the Olympia Paris is overall, an impressive new live effort from the veteran performer. That is due in part to an extensive set list that reaches all the way back to Sting’s earliest days with The Police and even all the way up to his most recent album, 2016’s 57th & 9th. The bonus songs from Sting’s son Joe Sumner and The Last Bandaleros gives them a unique opportunity to introduce themselves to audiences. The groups’ performances round out the recording’s most important elements. Each noted element is important in its own right to this recording’s whole. All things considered, the elements noted here make Live at the Olympia Paris a presentation that the veteran performer’s fans will agree is worth the watch. It is available now in stores and online. More information on Live at the Olympia Paris is available along with all of Sting’s latest news and more at:

Website: http://www.sting.com

Facebook: http://www.faceboook.com/sting

Twitter: http://twitter.com/OfficialSting

More information on this and other titles from Eagle Rock Entertainment is available online now at:

Website: http://www.eagle-rock.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/EagleRockEnt

Twitter: http://twitter.com/EagleRockNews

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

‘Live in Prague’ Will “Score” With Zimmer’s Fans And Movie Buffs Alike

Courtesy: Eagle Rock Entertainment

Hans Zimmer is one of the most respected and sought after composers in the entertainment industry today.  With credits reaching all the way back to 1982’s Moonlighting, which starred Jeremy Irons, and as recent as 2017’s Genius, which recently aired on National Geographic Channel and starred Johnny Flynn and Geoffrey Rush as the young and adult Albert Einstein respectively, Zimmer has successfully worked on dozens of movies television programs and even music videos throughout his career.  This coming Friday, Nov. 3, audiences will get to experience some of Zimmer’s work firsthand in a new live setting thanks to Eagle Rock Entertainment’s new live recording Hans Zimmer Live in Prague.  Originally recorded live May 7, 2016 in Prague during Zimmer’s successful European concert tour, this two-hour, 18-minute concert is a clear example of why Zimmer is considered one of the entertainment industry’s great musical minds.  That is due in part to the songs and movies that make up the concert’s set list.  The visuals that are incorporated into the concert are just as certain as the set list to keep audiences entertained and engaged.  They will be discussed later.  The recording’s companion booklet rounds out its most important element.  Each element is important in its own right to ensuring audiences’ engagement and entertainment.  All things considered, the noted elements make Hans Zimmer Live in Prague a solid example of why Zimmer is one of the entertainment industry’s most respected figures.

Hans Zimmer Live in Prague is a concert experience unlike almost everything that Eagle Rock Entertainment has released in recent years.  That is because unlike so many of the company’s previous recordings, this is a full orchestral performance rather than a performance put on by a band, act or group.  It is a modern classical concert that through its snapshot of Zimmer’s career, shows why Zimmer’s is such a respected musical mind.  That is due in part to that snapshot.  The concert features songs used in some of the key moments in Zimmer’s career including Disney’s Pirates of the Caribbean franchise, Christopher Nolan’s Dark Knight Trilogy and Driving Miss Daisy as well as some of the lesser-known movies to which he contributed.  Those lesser-known movies include Crimson Tide (1995), The Thin Red Line (1998) and True Romance (1993).  Simply put, the movies and songs selected for the concert are but a glimpse into an otherwise extensive concert, yet still serve collectively to paint a clear picture of his career despite this fact.

On another level, the concert’s set list proves important to the concert’s presentation because of the thought put into its ordering.  Audiences will note that the concert starts off on a light-hearted note with ‘Driving,’ from Driving Miss Daisy, a gentle composition centered around Zimmer’s work on piano and Richard Harvey’s work on clarinet.  From there, the concert’s energy gradually builds more and more with each song until finally relaxing again late in its run in the performance of ‘You’re So Cool’ from True Romance. The set list becomes even more reserved – albeit momentarily – as Zimmer and his fellow musicians make their way into the theme song from the hit 1988 Dustin Hoffman/Tom Cruise hit Rain Man before building back again as it moves into ‘What Are You Going To Do When You Are Not Saving The World?’, taken from the 2013 Superman incarnation Man of Steel.  The energy remains high for quite a while from here before pulling back noticeably in the tribute to the victims of the 2012 Aurora, CO movie theater shooting in the aptly titled ‘Aurora.’  Once again, the energy builds back again following that deeply moving composition as the organization makes its way through a pair of medleys from Interstellar and Inception to close out the show.  The way in which the whole show closes is the perfect accent to that final crescendo as it closes out the concert in expert fashion.  It is just one more way in which the set list proves pivotal to the concert’s presentation.  Keeping all of this in mind, it becomes clear why this concert’s set list is such an important piece of its whole.  If any one thing can be said negative to the set list, it would be that considering his extensive resume, it would have been nice to have received more than just his most recent blockbuster action flick compositions.  It would have been nice to have seen August Rush (2007), the 2010 TV mini-series The Pacific and maybe even The Simpsons Movie since he had a direct hand in that movie, too.  While it is nice to see as many classics as are represented here, it would have been nice to see them balanced with more of his body of work rather than so many of his major blockbuster work.  That is not to say the set list should have been longer, but rather just more representative of Zimmer’s current body of work.  Even with this in mind, the set list still proves regardless to be its own important part of the recording’s whole.  It is only one of the key elements to note in examining this recording.  The visuals incorporated into the concert are just as important to discuss as the concert’s set list.

The visuals incorporated into this concert are so important to discuss because of the impact that they have when coupled with the music.  Rather than just putting the scenes to which each composition was connected in its respective movie, Zimmer and company instead chose to use more random visualizations to illustrate the songs’ energies.  The visuals used in partner with ‘Journey to the Red Line’ (from The Thin Red Line) is one of the are among the hardest hitting because of their simplicity.  A dotted red line pulses behind the orchestra in time with the pulse of the song’s beat, and grows in its intensity along with the arrangement’s intensity.  This simple approach goes a long way toward illustrating the song’s emotional depth and power.  Whether or not audiences have seen The Thin Red Line, the use of that visual, when coupled with the equally engaging arrangement, lets audiences know that this arrangement obviously was meant to illustrate a very tense situation.  It does an impressive job of illustrating that emotion, too.  In the same vein, the strobes and flashing colors used in ‘The Electro Suite’ (taken from The Amazing Spiderman 2) couple with the song’s guitar-driven, almost rock style arrangement to give audiences a vivid picture of how Electro came to being in that movie even without having seen the movie.  It is yet another truly intense moment that is certain to keep audiences engaged and entertained.  On a serious side note, moments such as this may be considered dangerous for any viewer who might suffer from epilepsy because of the constant flashing of the lights.  That must be noted.  Even when the visuals are as simple as changing colors, such as in the theme from Crimson Tide, that minimalist approach proves useful, too.  That is because the colors themselves serve to illustrate the mood created first through the music.  It is just one more example of why the visualizations incorporated into this concert are so important to its presentation, and is hardly the last example that could be cited.  Keeping this in mind, the concert’s companion booklet rounds out its most important elements.

The companion booklet included with Hans Zimmer Live in Prague is important to the recording’s whole because of the background that it offers audiences before they take in the concert from the comfort of their homes.  Jeremy Thomas writes in the recording’s liner notes the reason that Prague was chosen as the site for this recording – he notes the country’s history played a big part in that choice – Zimmer’s willingness from one song to the next to not stick to just one type of musical grouping, allowing electric guitars to be married with pan flutes and other non-traditional instruments in some points while using other more traditional groupings in others.  As if this is not enough, Thomas also gives a concise summary of the concert and much more through his liner notes.  Between the items noted here and those not discussed, the whole of the material discussed throughout the booklet’s liner notes offers its own enjoyment for audiences.  When that enjoyment is considered along with the enjoyment offered through the concert’s set list and visualizations, the whole of those elements shows why this one-of-a-kind recording from Eagle Rock Entertainment will “score” with Zimmer’s fans and movie buffs alike.

Eagle Rock Entertainment’s forthcoming recording Hans Zimmer Live in Prague is a work that is certain to “score” with Zimmer’s fans and with movie buffs alike.  That is due in part to the recording’s set list.  Despite lifting liberally from the most recent blockbusters which Zimmer scored, the set list does include songs from some of the lesser-known movies on which Zimmer worked, too.  The visualizations used in each song (and medley) adds its own touch to the recording.  Rather than relying on footage from the songs’ associated movies, random visualizations are used throughout, allowing audiences to create their own scenes in their own minds.  The liner notes included in the recording’s companion booklet put the finishing touch on the recording.  Each element is important in its own right to the recording’s whole.  All things considered, they make this recording one that will, again, “score” with Zimmer’s fans and movie buffs alike.  It will be available Friday, Nov. 3 in stores and online.  More information on this and other titles from Eagle Rock Entertainment is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.eagle-rock.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/EagleRockEnt

Twitter: http://twitter.com/EagleRockNews

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.