Faith & Scars’ Debut LP Presents Plenty Of Firepower

Courtesy: TAG Publicity

Independent rock band Faith & Scars’ debut album Revolver officially drops today.  The eight-song record runs only 26-minutes, but in that time, it proves itself a strong debut from the band.  That is proven in part through the record’s collective musical arrangements.  They will be discussed shortly.  For all that the arrangements do for the album’s presentation, it does bring about at least one concern – its sequencing.  The sequencing does not make the album a failure, but is something that cannot be ignored.  It will be addressed a little later.  The concern raised by Revolver’s sequencing is its only real notable negative.  Its impact is lessened through an examination of the record’s lyrical content, which when coupled with the musical arrangements, makes for even more appeal.  Considering the noted appeal and the one minor concern, Revolver still proves itself a work that has plenty of its own firepower.

Faith & Scars’ debut album (and second studio recording – the band’s first studio recording was its 2016 EP Highway Ride) is a positive start for the up-and-coming independent rock band.  That is proven in part through the record’s musical arrangements.  The arrangements in question are largely southern and pure, guitar rock-tinged compositions.  They are easily comparable to works from the likes of Sons of Texas, Charm City Devils, and Black Heart Saints.  That is clear in listening to the twang in the guitar line and the heaviness in the drums.  Front man Roger Glenn’s vocal delivery even has that certain southern rock twang in his delivery style, adding to that noted comparison.  The more modern guitar rock sound makes itself known early on slightly in ‘Rain.’  Right from the song’s opening bars and its heavy intro, listeners get thoughts of Motley Crue.  That influence gives way as the song proceeds, to more of the noted southern rock sound before returning to a more modern rock sound in the choruses.  What’s interesting to note here is that the more modern rock sound in those choruses is comparable to works from Saliva.  Audiences get even more of that Saliva-type sound in ‘Breathe,’ the album’s midpoint.  The Charm City Devils comparison is just as evident in the song’s arrangement as the Saliva influence, adding to its appeal.  ‘Never The Same’ also boasts the noted Saliva influence.  As the album reaches its end, audiences get more of the Motley Crue influence, except in this case, it is in the more subdued fashion akin to that band’s more reserved works.  There is also a slight hint of a Zac Brown Band influence here thanks to the subtlety in the guitar, bass and drums.  Looking back through all of this, what audiences get in Revolver’s musical arrangements is a collection of compositions that gives them a solid range of influences and styles.  That in itself makes for plenty of reason in itself for audiences to hear this record.  For all that the record’s musical content does to help its presentation, the record does raise one concern.  That concern is its sequencing.

Revolver’s sequencing poses a problem that one cannot ignore, yet in the album’s defense, it is not such that it makes the album a failure.  The sequencing proves a problem primarily because of the placement of just one song – ‘Lightning.’  ‘Lightning’ closes out the album and is the record’s sole reserved moment.  Even ‘Never The Same,’ which does have its own slightly reserved points, is not as pulled back as this song’s arrangement.  Every other moment in this eight-song record is so adrenaline-fueled.  So to go from having so much energy throughout to the stark, sudden change in the record’s finale is just uncomfortable.  Listeners will find themselves wanting to accept the song’s placement, but it is just so difficult.  Looking at the album from a purely observational standpoint, it would have made so much more sense to made the song the record’s midpoint.  Had the band (and whomever made the final decision on the sequencing) gone that route, the album would have been a perfect start for the band.  That is especially the case in considering the overall structure of ‘Never The Same.’  The way in which that song balances its more fiery and more reserved moments and the way in which it closes would have made for a much smoother finale.  Of course hindsight is 20/20.  Again, this is a concern that listeners cannot ignore, but even considering that, is not enough to ruin the album’s presentation.  The record’s lyrical content couples with its musical arrangement to make for even more appeal.

The lyrical content featured in Revolver is important to note in examining the album because of its accessibility.  Case in point is the lyrical content featured in the album’s lead single, ‘Breathe.’  The band talked about that content in a prepared statement back in March when the band premiered the song and its video. 

“In a time where the world seems so divided, ‘Breathe’ is a song meant to crate hope for anyone who is struggling,” the statement reads.  “We want to let everyone know that they are not alone in the trials they face.  We hope that we can lead by example and show that even when life brings you to your lowest point, you can still rise up and live a life worth leading.”

On another note, audiences get a southern pride anthem of sorts in ‘Nothin’ Wrong.’  Glenn sings in the song, that “there ain’t nothin’ wrong wit ha rebel yell/Take a shot of whiskey/And raise some hell.”  There are also mentions of enjoying trips to Louisiana, Florida, North Carolina, etc.  Again, this is a full-on tribute to all things southern.  It will definitely get its share of audiences putting their horns in the air.  It is just one more example of what makes the album’s lyrical content so important.  ‘Long Way Home’ presents yet another way in which the album’s lyrical content proves so important.

‘Long Way Home’ is a song that centers on one’s self-care, according to a statement that the band released upon the debut of the single’s video.

“We wrote ‘Long Way Home’ as a reminder to remain grounded, in tune with yourself, and focused in the midst of the storm that is life,” the statement reads in part. “Oftentimes life will strike us like a tidal wave. Saying it can be hard to endure is an understatement. The lyrics promote positive state of mind, & self caring. We believe that, especially in the unknown, taking that extra moment to breathe, relax, and re-align with oneself is crucial to maintaining a positive mindset.”

The noted statement is illustrated as Glenn sings about being wary “of the whiskey sunrise,” “the blind man,” and encouraging people to heed the man’s words.  The added note of taking “the long way home/Back to the place where I’m from” is, in its own way, a reminder that people need to keep their priorities in order.  It echoes the comments in the statement.  Keeping that in mind along with the equally accessible themes in the other noted songs’ lyrical content (and that of the rest of the album’s songs) the album’s lyrical content in whole leaves zero doubt about its importance to the record’s whole.  When the record’s lyrical content is considered along with its companion musical content, that collective content in whole counters the record’s one concern to make the presentation in whole a still positive work from Faith & Scars.

Faith & Scars’ debut album Revolver is a record whose presentation hits the mark in nearly every way.  That is due in part to its accessible musical arrangements.  The arrangements will appeal widely to southern rock fans, those of classic and even more modern rock sounds.  It couples with the record’s equally accessible lyrical content to make this record quite a positive presentation even despite the concern raised in the album’s sequencing.  Keeping all of this in mind, Revolver is a work that is a near perfect first full-length recording from Faith & Scars.  The record is available now.

More information on Faith & Scars is available online now along with all of the band’s latest news at:

Websitehttp://www.faithandscars.com

Facebookhttp://www.facebook.com/FaithandScarsOfficial

Twitterhttp://twitter.com/faithandscars

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Faith & Scars Debuts ‘Long Way Home’ Video

Courtesy: TAG Publicity

Faith & Scars continues to build anticipation for its debut album.

The band debuted the video for its new single ‘Long Way Home‘ on June 20.  The song is the fourth single from the band’s forthcoming album Revolver, which is scheduled for release Oct. 17.  Pre-orders are open for the album are open.

Revolver is the follow-up to Faith & Scars’ debut record, its 2016 EP Highway Ride.  Audiences can listen to the EP in full on the band’s official website.

Faith & Scars’ new video, directed by Roger Glenn and Jaiden Hord Frost, takes audiences to the old west, away from the wrestling wring that served as the backdrop for the band’s past three singles.

The band offered some insight into the video’s treatment in a collective statement, noting its creation had a link to a place close to the band’s home in Selma, NC.

“This was the biggest production we’ve done so far, and it was a blast!!,” the statement reads.  “We had an amazing experience hopping back in time, & reimagining ourselves in The Wild West, 1885. When we were pitching ideas for this shoot, Roger remembered visiting “Wild Bill’s Western Town – Shadowhawk” in high school. Shadowhawk is located just minutes from where Roger grew up in Smithfield, North Carolina. It’s a replica Wild West town built in 1997 by former Hollywood actor Bill Drake. Drake played roles in episodes of Gunsmoke, Bonanza, and appeared in a number of ’70s-era Westerns.

Shadowhawk was much more than a backdrop for us. Being on set was indescribable. There’s a real energy about that little western town that threw us back in time. It suspended our disbelief & for that entire shoot, we lived the roles. We felt like real life cowboys. Definitely a childhood dream come true! On top of the mind blowing experience, the staff of Shadowhawk were incredibly kind & courteous.

Once we had the location nailed down, we moved into production. This was not easy by any stretch of the imagination. FUN, but not easy! Roger put weeks into storyboarding, writing scripts, & creating the shot list. All the wardrobe was put together by Logan & Roger, which was also no easy task. Roger & Cheyanne Liverman, who’s making her 2nd appearance in a Faith & Scars music video, made all the ‘wanted’ posters seen in the film as well. Cheyanne completed the weathered look of the posters with aging & distressing techniques using coffee, scissors, and fire.

After we had the scripts, storyboards, shot lists, wardrobe, & setting, we still had to find a way to bring the town to life. We looked no further than our friends & family. We had Cheyanne Liverman play multiple roles in the film. She was an extra in a couple of scenes, and a quickdraw cowgirl in the bar scene. We also called on our great friend, Eric Anderson. Eric played an extra in the town, but primarily the Sheriff. He did an awesome job bringing that character to life! We also got to play our own parts in the film! Again, not to be cliche’, but to be able to act in a western was truly an honor. The little kid versions of ourselves would be over the moon to see this. We brought back Filmmaker Jaiden Frost for the shoot. He’s always a blast to work with, and has an amazing eye for film. We spent many weeks after the shoot with him editing it all together. He’s amazing at what he does, and we couldn’t have done it without him. We found out the hard way, to shoot a western is to live a western! It was nothing short of 107 degrees in those buildings, but we made it through! Putting it all together was grueling, but it was rewarding. It was a group effort, and we couldn’t be happier with the finished product.

We’ve thoroughly enjoyed this whole experience, and we’re so grateful for the support we’ve received so far! Keep an eye out for easter eggs of what’s to come!”

The video matches the song’s musical arrangement, which features a familiar southern/country rock approach.

While the song’s backdrop and sound is different from that of its predecessors, its lyrical theme runs along the same lines as that of the noted songs.

The band talked about that theme in a collective statement.

‘Long Way Home’ is a departure from our trilogy, ‘Breathe’, ‘No Apologies’, & ‘Never the Same,’ the statement reads.  “It introduces a new storyline, representing persistence & balance. We wrote ‘Long Way Home’ as a reminder to remain grounded, in tune with yourself, & focused in the midst of the storm that is life. Oftentimes life will strike us like a tidal wave. Saying it can be hard to endure is an understatement. The lyrics promote positive state of mind, & self caring. We believe that, especially in the unknown, taking that extra moment to breathe, relax, and re-align with oneself is crucial to maintaining a positive mindset.”

Faith & Scars debuted the video for its third single ‘Never The Same‘ last month.  Its debut was preceded by the debut of the videos for the songs ‘No Apologies‘ and ‘Breathe.’

More information on Faith & Scars is available online now along with all of the band’s latest news at:

 

Websitehttp://www.faithandscars.com

Facebookhttp://www.facebook.com/FaithandScarsOfficial

Twitterhttp://twitter.com/faithandscars

 

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Faith & Scars Debuts ‘Never The Same’ Video

Courtesy: TAG Publicity

Independent rock band Faith & Scars debuted the video for another new single last week.

The band debuted the video for its new single ‘Never The Same‘ May 20.  The video, co-directed by Roger Glenn and Jaiden Frost, continues the story established through the band’s past two singles, ‘No Apologies‘ and ‘Balance‘ and builds on that story in the process.

The main character from those songs’ videos finds the negative figure that he fought in said presentations, but symbolically buries it once and for all.  The thing is that while he puts an end to that matter, another subject, this time a woman, is terrorized by her own negative force.  The woman is played by actress Cheyenne Liverman.

While Liverman’s character sleeps, the band performs its new single in what is meant to look like a live setting.  It all leads up to Liverman’s character waking from her slumber, only to be terrorized by the masked figure that terrorized the subject of the videos from the first two videos.

The song’s musical  arrangement is a more melodic, emotional approach than that of ‘No Apologies’ and ‘Balance.’  It presents a sense of emotional vulnerability, which plays into the song’s lyrical content, and by connection, its video.

The band explained the song’s lyrical content in a collective statement that reads in part, “The driving message that we want to deliver with this song is: You are stronger than you believe. At times it may seem that you’re spinning your wheels or lost, but trust us when we reiterate, you’re stronger than you think. We encourage you to search deep within yourself and realize that you already possess the power to make a change, any change you want to! Just try to wake up each day and treat it with the respect & dignity of a new start. You can move mountains! It’s within you already.”

The statement additionally notes, “This song begs a generation to wake up. We the people, should strive to help other people. We believe that change starts with an idea. The idea is unity.  Let’s stand together on this. Let’s strive to make the world a better place. Let us leave it in better shape than we found it. After all, you never know when you’re just one misstep away from ‘Never the Same’. Food for thought, Keep the Faith.”

‘Never The Same’ is the third single from Faith & Scars’ forthcoming album RevolverPre-orders for the eight-song record are open now. The album, scheduled for release Oct.17, 2020, is the follow-up release to the band’s 2016 EP Highway Ride.

Audiences can listen to the EP in full on the band’s official website.

More information on Faith & Scars is available online now along with all of the band’s latest news at:

 

Websitehttp://www.faithandscars.com

Facebookhttp://www.facebook.com/FaithandScarsOfficial

Twitterhttp://twitter.com/faithandscars

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Faith & Scars Debuts ‘No Apologies’ Video

Courtesy: TAG Publicity

Faith & Scars debuted the video for its latest single last week.

The band debuted the video for its new song ‘No Apologies‘ April 20. The video picks up where the band’s video for its song ‘Breathe‘ left off, with a very evil figure about to overcome the hero in the wrestling wring.  It finds our hero facing off against the demonic figure in the squared circle, eventually getting a hand from his band mates before seemingly overcoming the demonic-looking figure.

The song’s musical arrangement is just as driving and up-tempo as ‘Breathe,’ with its guitars, drums and bass forming the song’s foundation.

The song’s lyrical content is similar to that of ‘Breathe,’ too, as the band explained in a collective statement.

“This song is a physical fight,” the statement reads.  “It’s an argument.  It’s a battle cry for all those willing to stand up for what they believe in.’

The band stressed in its statement that ‘No Apologies’ is meant to deliver the message that while staying positive might be a good start in trying to overcome adversity, it is just a start. The band stressed it takes initiative to keep up the fight.  In other words, actions are just as important as having a positive mindset in order to overcome adversity.

‘No Apologies’ is now the second single from ‘Faith & Scars’ debut album Revolver. The album, scheduled for release Oct.17, 2020,  is the follow-up release to the band’s 2016 EP Highway Ride. Pre-orders for Revolver are open now.

Audiences can listen to the EP in full on the band’s official website.

More information on Faith & Scars is available online now along with all of the band’s latest news at:

 

Websitehttp://www.faithandscars.com

Facebookhttp://www.facebook.com/FaithandScarsOfficial

Twitterhttp://twitter.com/faithandscars

 

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.