‘Under The Pepper Tree’ Is A Successful First Family Music Outing For Sara Watkins

Courtesy: New West

Singer-songwriter Sara Watkins has made quite the name for herself over the years as a member of the bluegrass group Nickel Creek and as part of the Watkins Family Hour and I’m With Her.  Now this Friday, Watkins will take her first step into another phase of her career with her debut family music album, Under the Pepper Tree.  The 15-song first outing is a presentation that will appeal to her fans and those of one Diana Panton.  That is due in part to the song’s that make up the album’s body.  They will be discussed shortly.  The musical arrangements that Watkins employs throughout the album add to its appeal and will be discussed a little later.  The sequencing of that overall content puts the finishing touch to the record and will also be discussed later.  Each item noted here is important in its own way to the whole of the album.  All things considered, Sarah Watkins’ debut family music album is a successful offering that the whole family will indeed enjoy.

Sara Watkins’ debut family music album is a work that the whole family truly will enjoy.  That is due in part to its featured songs.  The songs in question are a selection of songs from various classic movies.  Bob Nolan’s ‘Tumblin’ Tumbleweed,’ from Gene Autry’s 1935 movie by the same name is featured here along with the likes of ‘Edelweiss’ from 20th Century Fox’s adaptation of Rodgers &  Hammerstein’s musical, The Sound of Music (1965), and ‘When You Wish Upon a Star’ from Disney’s classic Pinocchio (1940).  Also represented here is ‘You’ll Never Walk Alone’ from 20th Century Fox’s adaptation of Rodgers & Hammerstein’s musical, Carousel (1956); ‘La la Lu’ from Disney’s Lady and the Tramp (1955) and even ‘Moon River’ from Paramount Pictures’ 1961 movie, Breakfast at Tiffany’s.  There is even an original tune in the form of the album’s title track along with everything else.  The songs will relate to listeners of all ages because they are all timeless works that the noted audiences will remember.  Given, parents will recognize some of the songs more than children, but that aside, those songs will still entertain younger listeners.

On another level, that some of the songs (and their related movies) will connect more with older audiences than with children. That in itself serves as a starting point for older audiences to offer younger listeners the most basic introduction to so many classic musicals and movies.  That early introduction could help lead to a lifelong love for said presentations.  So while on the surface, the songs make up a collective of soundtrack works, they actually can and do serve an even greater purpose, bringing families together while building a foundation and love for the great timeless works of stage and screen from entertainment’s golden age.  To that end, the songs featured in this compilation form a solid foundation for the record itself.  It is just one part of what makes the recording so enjoyable.  The arrangements that Watkins chose for these songs adds to the record’s overall appeal.

Watkins largely stays true to the source material in each song that she features in her new record, from one to the next.  For all of that honor that Watkins pays to the original works, she still gives them her own nice touch.  Case in point is her take on ‘Stay Awake.’  Originally featured as one of the songs from Disney’s 1964 musical adaptation of author P.L. Travers’ novel Mary Poppins, the song was a gentle lullabye crafted by  the famed Sherman Brothers, Richard and Robert.  It featured Julie Andrews’ absolutely stunning vocal control alongside some even more subtle strings.  Watkins’ take on the song would have fit just as well into that movie.  It is just as moving with its piano line joining with the strings to make the song even richer.  Watkins’ over vocal delivery is so powerful in its simplicity here, too.  Ironically though being a lullaby, Watkins’ take on the song is enough to make even the most emotionally strong man blubber like a baby.  That is a telling statement. 

On a different note, Watkins’ take on Bob Nolan’s ‘Tumbling Tumblewood’ stays even truer to its source material, complete with fiddle and the slightest touch of a slide guitar.  Of course, gone are the clip-clop of the horse hoofs and the string arrangement featured in the original song performed by Roy Rogers and the Sons of the Pioneers.  Instead, Watkins has opted here for the more spit-shined take that even what with everything in mind, the song still sounds quite a bit like something that one might hear playing in the old honky tonk joints of country music’s golden era.  To that point, it is still its own unique arrangement.

‘Moon River’ is another example of the importance of the musical arrangements featured in Watkins’ new record.  Her take on the song does stay true to its source material for the most part, stylistically.  Though there are some subtle differences between the original version composed by Henry Mancini and Johnny Mercer, and sung by Audrey Hepburn, and Watkins’ take.  Right off the bat, the string arrangements and the harmonica featured in the original are absent in Watkins’ rendition.  They are replaced here by the subtle addition of a Hammond organ.  Watkins’ own vocal delivery bears its own identity here.  Her delivery is just as soft and gentle as that of Hepburn and almost as airy.  That whole set against the whole of the original makes Watkins’ take here just as interesting as the other covers featured in the compilation.  When those other songs are considered with this arrangement and the others examined here, the whole leaves no doubt as to the importance of the recording’s overall musical content.  When that content is considered along with the featured songs themselves, that whole gives listeners even more to like.  When all of that is considered along with the record’s sequencing, the record is rounded out and completed.

The sequencing of Under the Pepper Tree keeps the album’s energy light from beginning to end of its 36-minute run time, starting off relaxed in her take of ‘Blue Shadows on the Trail.’  The energy really does not pick back up until late in the album’s run in Watkin’s take of ‘Blanket for a Sail.’  Up until that point, the energy remains relatively reserved.  It pulls back again from there right up to the album’s finale, ‘Good Night.’  So basically what audiences get overall due to the sequencing here, is a record that will serve to relax any listener.  As a matter of fact, one might even be able to use the record to help get to sleep being that the record’s energy is so gentle.  Between that, the unique takes on the songs and the very selection of songs, the whole makes the record in whole a work that is a truly successful family music album.

Sara Watkins’ debut family music album Under the Pepper Tree is a positive new offering that the whole family will indeed enjoy.  That is due in part to the record’s featured songs, the majority of which are timeless songs that are themselves featured in some of the most famous and beloved movies of all time.  The arrangements that Watkins presents here are themselves important to the record’s presentation.  They stay largely true to their source material but also give the songs the slightest of updates, making for even more appeal.  The sequencing of this overall content keeps the record’s energy relatively light and reserved throughout the record’s nearly 40-minute run time.  That means the record’s overall energy will keep listeners relaxed.  That will result in a positive mindset for any listener.  Each item noted here is important in its own way to the whole of this record.  All things considered, they make the record in whole a successful first family music outing for Sarah Watkins.  Under the Pepper Tree is scheduled for release Friday through New West Records.  More information on the album is available along with all of Watkins’ latest news at:

Websitehttps://sarawatkins.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sarawatkins

Twitterhttps://twitter.com/SaraWatkins

To keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.  

Gene Autry Movie, TV Archives Coming To Shout! Factory TV

Photo Credit: Autry Qualified Interest Trust and The Autry Foundation
Gene Autry from Rovin’ Tumbleweeds (1939)

Shout! Factory TV will take audiences back to the old west next month.

The company will stream Gene Autry’s TV and movie archive beginning May 1. The resurrection of the archives marks the first time ever that the properties have been available to stream by any company.

Shout! Factory TV worked closely with Gene Autry Entertainment to curate the titles. The first group of Gene Autry titles to stream (May 1) are his feature films, South of the Border, Gaucho Serenade, Melody Ranch, The Strawberry Roan and Blue Canadian Rockies.  The second round of content — Public Cowboy No. 1, In Old Monterey, RovinTumbleweeds, RidinOn A Rainbow and Sioux City Sue will start streaming June 1.

Autry’s TV and film collection will be available to stream on all Shout! Factor TV platforms: Shout!FactoryTV.com, Shout! Factory TV’s Roku Amazon Fire, Apple TV and Android apps.  It will also be available on Shout! Factory TV-branded channels, such as Tubi, Amazon Prime Video Direct, Amazon Channels and Roku Channel.  Each of Autry’s films will stream on the noted channels on the last Wednesday of each month, too.

The synopsis of each of Autry’s movies is noted below.

 

List of Films and Synopses
Available May 1, 2020
South of the Border (1939)
On the eve of World War II, Federal agents Gene Autry and Smiley Burnette are sent South of the Border to help foil the plans of foreign spies attempting to gain control of Mexican oil fields. Full of action, humor and music, this 1939 release introduced both the title song and teen performer Mary Lee to movie audiences.
Gaucho Serenade (1940)
A case of mistaken identity sends Gene and Frog (Smiley Burnette), two down-and-out ex-rodeo stars, on a rip-roaring, cross-country trek as they help a little boy evade the gangsters responsible for the false imprisonment of his father. This “road picture,” originally released in 1940, features Duncan Renaldo, TV’s popular Cisco Kid, and counts “A Song at Sunset” among its classic tunes.
Melody Ranch (1940)
Lawlessness runs rampant in Gene’s hometown of Torpedo until the movie and radio cowboy returns as Honorary Sheriff for a Frontier Days celebration and cleans up the town. Showcasing classics like “We Never Dream the Same Dream Twice” and its title song, and featuring Jimmy Durante and Ann Miller, this musical was Gene’s biggest theatrical production when it was released November 15, 1940. Melody Ranch was selected by the Library of Congress for the National Film Registry in 2002.
The Strawberry Roan (1948)
In Gene Autry’s first color picture, Champion stars in the title role as a wild stallion who becomes a legend of the West. More exciting than any manhunt is the furious pursuit of an outlaw stallion, branded a killer, and the two-fisted cowboy who fights off a gun-crazed posse to win justice for the noble animal. Filmed in vibrantly hued Cinecolor against the beauty of Arizona landscapes, The Strawberry Roan combines thrill-filled action with a tender story of loyalty and includes five great Western songs, including the title song and “The Angel Song.”
Blue Canadian Rockies (1952)
Gene Autry and Champion crash through a maze of murder and mayhem on a dude ranch deep in the heart of the tall timber country. Montana rancher Cyrus Higbee sends Gene, his foreman, to Canada to stop the marriage of his daughter Sandra to Todd Markley, whom he suspects is a fortune hunter. Gene soon discovers that Sandra has turned the place into a dude ranch with entertainers Carolina Cotton and the Cass County Boys. When a mountie is murdered and lumberjacks threaten to take over, Gene and Pat Buttram must find the real murderer and bring peace to the Blue Canadian Rockies. Features the title song and the humorous tune “Mama Don’t Like Music.”
Available June 1, 2020
Public Cowboy No. 1 (1937)
Gene Autry’s tried and true crime fighting methods are put to the test when cattle rustlers employ modern technology – including refrigerated trucks, planes and two-way radios – in Public Cowboy No. 1. Things get worse when the local newspaper gal’s scathing editorials bash Gene’s old-fashioned methods and demand the locals call in “progressive” big city detectives. It’s up to Gene and his horse Champion, along with pal Frog Millhouse, to prove that the Western straight-shooting methods of dealing with crime still hold true! Features the classic tune “The West Ain’t What It Used to Be.”
In Old Monterey (1939)
Sergeant Gene Autry, formerly a rancher, pretends to quit the Army to persuade stubborn farmers to sell their land for a military proving ground. Gene soon discovers that unscrupulous mine owners are keeping the ranchers stirred up in hopes that the government will grow weary of the dealings and pay a higher price for their land. Smiley Burnette and June Storey join Gene in this wartime Western. Features the classic song “Tumbling Tumbleweeds.”
Rovin’ Tumbleweeds (1939)
Rancher Autry takes a job singing on the radio to aid farmers and ranchers whose lands were destroyed by raging floods. Blaming crooked politicians, he goes to Washington and tries to put through a flood control bill and finds he has a lot to learn. In this classic release, Gene introduces his immortal theme song,“Back in the Saddle Again,” which has gone on to become a piece of American history.
Ridin’ On A Rainbow (1941)
Assisting in the search for murderous bank robbers, rancher Gene Autry goes undercover as a showboat entertainer to capture the crooks and recover the money. Key to their investigation is the young singer Patsy, played by Mary Lee. Action-packed from ship to shore, the film’s showstopping musical numbers include Gene’s performance of “Be Honest with Me,” nominated for an Academy Award® for Best Song of 1941.
Sioux City Sue (1946)
Gene trades in his wings for a pair of spurs in his first movie after returning from World War II. To get his ranch out of dire financial straits, Gene reluctantly goes to Hollywood to make a movie. But his real troubles begin on his return when everyone finds out he’s the voice of Ding Dong the animated singing donkey, and his nemesis tries to drive him to ruin. Released November 21, 1946, this classic features Sterling Holloway and the hit “Oklahoma Hills.”

 

More information on Shout! Factory TV’s upcoming Gene Autry presentations is available online along with all of the latest Shout! Factory news at:

 

Website: http://www.shoutfactory.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/shoutfactoryofficial

Twitter: http://twitter.com/ShoutFactory

 

More information on all things Gene Autry is available online at:

 

Website: http://www.GeneAutry.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/GeneAutryOfficial

 

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

PBS’ Richard Sherman In-Studio Concert Will Leave Audiences “Singing” Its Praises

Courtesy: PBS/Public Media Distribution

John Williams. Hans Zimmer. The Sherman Brothers. One thing connects each of these names: each name is among the movie industry’s great musical minds. Each has composed some of the most well-known and beloved themes that audiences have ever heard. This past September, PBS and Public Media Distribution brought audiences a very special profile of one of those names with the release of Richard Sherman: Songs of a Lifetime. Released Sept. 5, this in-studio performance by its title figure, is a wonderful musical profile of one half of the famed Sherman Brothers creative musical team. That is due in no small part to the songs that Sherman performs for audiences. The stories that he shares along the way are just as entertaining as the songs, and in turn will be discussed later. The program’s bonus material rounds out its most important elements. Each noted element is important in its own right to the recording’s whole. All things considered, they make Richard Sherman: Songs of a Lifetime a release that will leave audiences “singing” its praises.

PBS’ recently released Richard Sherman musical documentary Songs of a Lifetime is a special new “live” recording from PBS and Public Media Distribution that is certain to leave audiences “singing” its praises. That is due in part to the recording’s songs. The songs that Sherman performs throughout the program are not limited to just his Disney compositions. Also included in this intimate setting are songs from Tom Sawyer (1973 — MGM), Chitty-Chitty Bang Bang (1968 — Pinewood Studios), Charlotte’s Web (1973 — Paramount Pictures/Hanna-Barbera Productions), Snoopy Come Home (1972 — Cinema Center Filims/Lee Mendelson Film Productions/Bill Melendez Productions/Sopwith Productions/United Features Syndicate), a Christmas tune that he composed with Joe Van Winkle titled ‘Christmas in New Orleans,’ (which was made famous by Louis Armstrong) and even his own heartfelt composition that he wrote for his wife (who is there to enjoy the song at his side) among so many others. There is even a brand new song included at the recording’s end titled ‘A Kiss Goodnight’ that is certain to move viewers of any age.

In regards to the Disney tunes featured throughout the recording, the movies featured through those songs include: Winnie The PoohMary Poppins, The Happiest Millionaire, The Jungle Book, Summer Magic, The Aristocats, The Jungle Book, Peter Pan, The Parent Trap and Bedknobs and Broomsticks. Needless to say, even though “only” ten movies are on that list, that is still a healthy cross-section of Sherman’s time with Walt Disney Studios. That is especially considering that some of those movies get more than one nod. Mary Poppins gets a handful of nods with the likes of ‘Feed The Birds,’ ‘Let’s Go Fly A Kite,’ and ‘Through The Eyes of Love.’ Winnie The Pooh received three nods through a medley of tunes early in the performance while The Jungle Book receives its own share of representations, too. Considering the number of Disney flicks represented in this in-studio concert and the songs used to represent those movies, it goes without saying that even at “only” nine movies, the concert presents a healthy dose of Disney.

When that healthy dose of Disney is coupled with Sherman’s non-Disney compositions, the whole the recording proves quite impressive. Counting the single songs and the medleys, it is safe to say that the recording boasts at least 30 songs. Considering that the performance’s run time is roughly one hour, that is a lot of material pushed into that space, and quite well at that. Staying on that note, while the material in whole is impressive, one cannot ignore the lack of a program guide inside or outside the box printed or physical. The only program guide that does exist is in the scene selection option on the disc’s main menu. The songs are not even listed with their respective movies. Sure it seems on the surface like a not so important aesthetic element, but is in fact very important to the box’s presentation. That is especially in connection to the songs themselves. It would have been nice to have had that listing. Luckily though, as much as it detracts from the recording’s whole, it is not enough to completely ruin the program’s presentation. It just would have been nice to have had that element.

While the extensive list of songs and movies that makes up the body of Songs of a Lifetime are clearly critical to the recording’s whole, they are collectively not the DVD’s only important element. The stories that Sherman shares throughout the recording are just as important to its presentation as those songs. One of the most interesting stories that Sherman shares during his time at the keys is that of the creation of the song ‘Gold Can Buy Anything (But Love),’ which was made famous by country legend Gene Autry. Sherman tells audiences that the song came about after the Sherman brothers’ father (who was himself a well-known and respected musical mind) jokingly told his sons that the pair, even with their college degrees, “couldn’t write a song that a kid would give up his lunch money to buy.” He also notes that the song was the Sherman Brothers’ very first published song, and was written because country western music was big at the time. Another interesting anecdote that Sherman shares in the program tells the story of how Louis Prima and his band ended up as King Louie and his apes in The Jungle Book. He explains that Walt Disney himself sent Sherman and company to a Las Vegas night club where Prima and company were performing, showed them the movie and convinced them to star. There is a little more to the story here, but that will be left to viewers to discover. It goes without saying that the rest of the story (as a certain radio announcer used to say) will leave audiences laughing happily. As if that isn’t enough to get viewers interested, Sherman also shares a moving story tying the creation of the song ‘It Changes’ (from Snoopy Come Home) to how he and others felt when Walt Disney died in 1966 from lung cancer. While the story is short, it is a story that, when coupled with the emotion of the song, will deeply touch audiences as it illustrates expertly that story. When this and the stories featured throughout the concert are joined with the recording’s featured songs, the whole of that material gives audiences more than enough to appreciate here. Even with this in mind, that whole is still not all that audiences will appreciate. The program’s bonus material rounds out its most important elements.

The bonus material included in Songs of a Lifetime is so important because of what it adds to the program’s overall presentation. Audiences learn through this roughly four-minute discussion from 2015, Sherman’s thoughts on PBS’ Walt Disney profile American Experience: Walt Disney. Audiences learn that Sherman approved of that doc, even as it didn’t just sing Disney’s praises, but instead showed both sides of Walt Disney — the good and bad. He also discusses his emotion at holding the interview in Disney’s office, the very place where he, his brother and Walt Disney crafted so many hit tunes. That revelation will capture audiences just as much as anything else in his interview. Audiences also learn that the guest performers included in the recording were hand chosen for the program by Sherman himself. They weren’t just random selections by some faceless person or group. This is all just a sample of what is presented in Sherman’s bonus interview. When it is coupled with the rest of the interview’s discussions, the whole gives audiences even more to to appreciate. The behind-the-scenes photos montage adds one last touch to the whole as it couples the songs from the main feature with the noted photos for an experience that, as simple as it is, is certain to entertain audiences, too. When this is set alongside Sherman’s short but in-depth interview and the program’s main feature, the whole of those elements makes Songs of a Lifetime a presentation that will most certainly leave audiences “singing” its praises.

PBS and PBS’ Distribution’s recently released Richard Sherman “live” recording Songs of a Lifetime is a work that is certain to impress audiences. That is due in no small part to the recording’s featured songs. The songs featured in the program include not only Sherman’s work with Disney, but with other studios and even his own compositions. All in all, they paint a vivid picture of his career, showing why he remains today such a respected figure (along with his brother). The stories that Sherman shares throughout the performance add even more interest to the program’s whole. At times funny and at others emotional, Sherman’s stories are just as certain to keep viewers engaged and entertained as his songs. The bonus material included in the program puts the finishing touch on its program thanks to its own information. Each noted element is critical in its own way to the program’s whole. All things considered, they make this presentation one that will most certainly leave audiences “singing” its praise. Richard Sherman: Songs of a Lifetime is available now and can be ordered online direct via PBS’ online store. More information on this and other titles from PBS is available online now at:

Website: http://www.pbs.org

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pbs

Twitter: http://twitter.com/pbs

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Shout! Factory, Timeless Media Unearth A “Timeless” TV Time Capsule In The Gene Autry Show: The Complete Series

Courtesy: Shout! Factory/Timeless Media

Courtesy: Shout! Factory/Timeless Media

Gene Autry’s name is one that is synonymous with success.  The “Singing Cowboy” has five stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.  Each one is for each entertainment medium.  Yet for all of his fame, he has sadly become one of the entertainment industry’s forgotten names.  Thanks to Shout! Factory and Timeless Media, that might finally change thanks to the release of The Gene Autry Show: The Complete Series, Collector’s Edition.  This fifteen disc set is an absolute must have for any viewer.  Whether one grew up with the series, new to its stories, or just a TV history buff, everyone will find something worthwhile in this brand new set.  Audiences will appreciate more than anything the fact that The Gene Autry Show: The Complete Series, Collector’s Edition presents every one of the series’ episodes exactly as they aired in their original broadcasts.  Fans of the series will also appreciate that in this brand new set, they get no just the original TV series in its full entirety, but also a handful of rather valuable bonuses.  And just as important to note is the set’s packaging.  The set’s packaging is bare bones, but still protects each of the set’s fifteen discs, making it that much more valuable for viewers of any age.

The very first thing that audiences will appreciate about The Gene Autry Show: The Complete Series, Collector’s Edition is that every single one of the series’ episodes is presented here.  Each episode is presented in its full entirety, too.  That means that audiences get no just the episodes, but the promotional spots for the shows, sponsor, Doublemint Gum.  Casual viewers of the series might just turn their heads at this.  But those that have more understanding of its importance will applaud this inclusion.  Whereas certain other programs at the time were sponsored by cigarette companies, this series was sponsored by a chewing gum company.  That only served to make it all the more family friendly.  The same can be said of its value to families today.  If that isn’t enough for audiences, the fact that the original footage has stood the test of time so well is one more reason to be excited about this set.  The Gene Autry Show first debuted over sixty-three years ago.  Television was still technically in its infancy at that time.  Considering how impressive the footage still looks today, those charged with its preservation are quite worthy of applause in this case.  It’s just the tip of the iceberg for fans of The Gene Autry Show, too.

Fans of The Gene Autry Show will most definitely appreciate the fact that the entire series is presented in its full entirety and that it looks as good as it does almost sixty-four years after it originally debuted.  Audiences will appreciate just as much, the bonus material included in this brand new set from Shout! Factory and Timeless Media.  Shout! Factory and Timeless Media have included as bonus material a sampling of the radio shows that would lead to one of Autry’s five stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.  And just as is the case with the video footage, the quality of the included radio show episodes is quite impressive, too.  Timeless Media and Shout! Factory didn’t stop there.  Oh, no.  Also included are trailers for some of his more well-known works.  The set’s fifteenth disc puts its bonus material over the top.  Disc Fifteen provides audiences with two episodes each from each of the five shows produced by Autry’s own company, Flying A Pictures.  Those shows were obviously his own show, The Range Rider, Annie Oakley, Buffalo Bill, Jr., and The Adventures of Champion.  Once again, one has to note the quality of the footage.  The quality of the footage stands out, as does the enjoyment factor of each of the shows’ two episodes.  It serves to make the set as a whole even more worth its roughly $80.00 MSRP.

The bonus material included in The Gene Autry Show: The Complete Series, Collector’s Edition and the inclusion of the entire series itself are the most important of factors in this set’s release.  But they aren’t all to be considered.  The set’s packaging must also be taken into account.  And the packaging will impress audiences just as much as everything else already noted.  Each of the set’s fourteen primary discs are placed one on either side of seven separate slip cases.  The bonus fifteenth disc is given its own spot inside its own case.  The set’s fourteen primary discs are protected from one another and from themselves, being placed in their own spot inside each of the set’s seven slip cases.  The same can be said of the bonus fifteenth disc.  And the exterior box that holds all fifteen discs is just as simplistic.  As simplistic as it is, audiences will enjoy the extra information on the show provided on the rear of the box.  It is provided here in place of an extra booklet.  Extra information is also provided on each of the set’s separate slip cases, too.  The inclusion of so much background information set against the simplistic yet smart packaging brings everything full circle with this set.  Taking it and the set’s bonus features and main material into account, it all collectively makes The Gene Autry Show: The Complete Series, Collector’s Edition one of the most valuable time capsules of television history to be unearthed in a very long time.  It will be available Tuesday, December 10th on DVD and can be ordered direct from the Shout! Factory online store at http://www.shoutfactory.com/product/gene-autry-show-complete-tv-series.  More information on this and other releases from Shout! Factory and Timeless Media is available online at http://www.shoutfactory.com and http://www.facebook.com/shoutfactoryofficial.  To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.