Dan Sindel Debuts ‘Edge Of Eternity’ Lyric Video

Courtesy: Head First Entertainment

Independent musician Dan Sindel debuted the video for his latest single, ‘Edge of Eternity’ last month.

Sindel debuted the lyric video for his single, ‘Edge of Eternity’ July 14. The debut came two months after he debuted his then latest single, ‘Stepping Stone.’ He released the single and its video.

The musical arrangement featured in Sindel’s latest single is a steady, easygoing composition. The pairing of Sindel’s vocal delivery style pairs with the instrumentation to immediately make it comparable to works from the likes of King’s X and the side projects of its members.

No explanation of the song’s lyrical theme is presented in the press release announcing the video’s premiere. In watching the lyrics presented on screen, the theme presents something of an existential rumination. The mention of there being no promise of tomorrow and not being able to seek a reprieve midway through the song, and worrying about money that you cannot save, almost seems to hint at a message of simply making the most of time because we are all on the edge of eternity. This is all just this critic’s interpretation.

Sindel’s latest single and its predecessor are expected for inclusion in his forthcoming album, Unpopular Music for Popular People Vol. 1. The album is scheduled for release in 2023, with an exact release date under consideration.

‘Edge of Eternity’ is available to stream and download now through Spotify and Apple Music.

More information on Dan Sindel’s new single and album is available along with all of his latest news at:

Websitehttps://dansindel.com

Twitterhttps://twitter.com/DSS_Unlimit3d

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Bret Micheals Band Guitarist Evick Covers 1983 War Protest Song For His New Solo Single

Courtesy: Head First Entertainment

Pete Evick, guitarist and musical director of the Bret Micheals Band, premiered a new take of the 1983 anti-war protest song, ‘99 Red Balloons‘ this month.

Evick and his fellow musicians updated the song, originally crafted and performed by Nena, in response to the conflict in Ukraine. As a child, Evick himself suffered emotionally from the fear of nuclear war and potential conflict with Russia, resulting in him having to go to therapy. Now with Russia instigating an unprovoked war on Ukraine, those emotions have returned, leading to his desire to update the song for a new age, he said.

 “I’m consumed with this tragedy to the point that I can’t function in my normal life,” Evick said. “I have no intention to profit from the song or use it to further my career. I simply want to raise awareness of this tragedy and show the Ukrainians that we care. This is just what I did while I’m figuring out how I can do more and really help.” 

Evick and company’s updated take of Nena’s song stays largely true to its source in material in regards to its sound. The stylistic approach though, is quite different. Where Nena’s original was a typical synth-driven new wave style composition, having been released in the early 80s, Evick and company’s version actually has more of a ska-approach, interestingly enough. The positive vibes of the approach taken here makes for an even more powerful contrast to the very serious nature of the song’s lyrical theme.

The musical arrangement that Evick and company take in their updated take of ’99 Red Balloons’ is just one way in which the group stays largely true to its source material. The video is also very similar. The only difference that in place of the random footage of explosions, Evick and company’s video shows footage of the destruction in Ukraine caused by Russia’s unprovoked attack on the nation. Evick himself even opens the video walking along a countryside just as Nena did herself in the opening of the original video. Evick meanwhile sports a shirt with a message of support for Ukraine as he takes his walk.

Along with working on a new take of ’99 Red Balloons,’ Evick is also working on a new website at https://evick.com/newsite.htm.

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

‘Tear Down Your Idols’ Is A Successful New Offering From Dirtbag Republic

Courtesy: Head First Entertainment

Independent rock band Dirtbag Republic returned Friday with its latest album, Tear Down Your Idols.  The band’s third album, it came more than four years after the release of the band’s then latest album, Downtown Eastside (2017).  The 11-song record is a presentation that many rock audiences will find interesting in a good way.  That is due in part to the album’s featured musical arrangements.  They will be discussed shortly.  The lyrical themes that accompany the album’s musical arrangements also play into the record’s presentation.  They will be examined a little later.  The record’s production rounds out its most important elements and will also be discussed later.  Each item noted is important in its own way to the whole of the recording.  All things considered, they make the album an enjoyable introduction to the band for some and an equally enjoyable return for the band’s established audiences.

Dirtbag Republic’s third album, Tear Down Your Idols, is a work that will appeal to a wide range of audiences.  Its appeal is due in part to its featured musical arrangements.  The arrangements in question display a variety of approaches and sounds.  Right from the opening of the 38-minute presentation, audiences get a track in ‘Main Objective’ that blends elements of pure guitar rock and some DIY garage punk elements for a whole that is unique in its own right.  ‘Skinny,’ which immediately follows, blends those elements just as well but still ensures the arrangement is not just a repeat of the album’s opener.  That is evident as it leans more in the punk direction this time.  ‘Wannabees,’ the record’s third entry, changes things up once again with an arrangement that is a sort of SoCal punk style composition.  The sleaze rock of the 80s is present here, too, but it plays just as much of a supporting role as it does in much of the rest of the record.  ‘Don’t Answer To No One,’ which serves as part of the record’s midpoint, is another example of the blending of the noted rock and punk elements, what with the use of the piano line against the guitars, gritty vocals, and drums.  The subtle variances in the arrangements continue from there through to the album’s end with the changes just enough in each to keep audiences fully engaged in the arrangements.  Keeping this in mind, the arrangements are reason enough for audiences to hear this album.  They are just part of what makes the record worth hearing.  The lyrical themes that accompany the record’s musical content add to its appeal in their own right.

The lyrical themes that are featured throughout Tear Down Your Idols are important to note because they are accessible, but not just more run of the mill content.  Rather, it touches on some lesser approached themes.  Case in point is the lyrical theme featured in the record’s title track.  According to information provided about the songs, this song’s theme centers on the behavior of fans toward musical acts they love growing in popularity.  Few acts across the musical universe have done this.  The only act that immediately comes to this critic’s mind in thinking about this topic is rapper Eminem.  So for the band to take on this topic, not necessarily shaming audiences per se, but addressing the behavior nonetheless is important.  That is because as much as audiences may want certain acts to be “their best kept secret,” those acts all want to become the next big thing and deserve support in those efforts.  The message is made clear as vocalist Sandy Hazard sings, “Everybody loves them now/Give it 2 to 4 more years/Going from the next messiahs to cancer of a Britney Spears/Everybody starts out small, playing clubs/And being part of the scene/Will popularity do them in/For fans who ain’t that keen anymore?/Do you really think you should tear down your idols?/When they become so popular it makes you suicidal/Do you really think you should tear down your idols/It doesn’t matter if you care about survival.”  The indictment of sorts continues as Hazard sings in the song’s second verse, “Should they stand in the firing line/Do you want to be the first to say you despise them?/Fan fav or social pariahs/Do you want to be the first to say you despise them?”  From here Hazard makes note of how far acts will go to keep fans because of those fair-weather audiences’ actions, re-issuing albums “with demos from a a garbage bin/Deluxe cash grabbin’ new version.”  He speaks so much truth here between the audiences’ reactions to the acts’ growth and the circular causality of sorts that leads the acts to react, too.  It is just one example of what makes the songs’ lyrical themes so attractive.  It is nice to see another act willing to take on the audiences who claim to be fans, but then so quickly willing to turn their backs on their favorite acts.  It is just one example of what makes the record’s lyrical themes so important to note.  ‘Main Obective’ is yet another example of that importance.

As the noted information states, this song centers on the matter of getting older but still “staying true to rock n’ roll.”  This is a matter that is accessible in its own right.  It is also a mostly unique theme, as there are few acts out there in the rock and metal community that will broach the topic, again.  There is still a stigma today, that people over 30 who listen to rock are old, etc.  That is really sad, too.  Rock (and music in general) transcends generations.  Hazard does a good job of echoing the defiance of that stigma as he sings, “People say, ‘man you should grow up’/It makes me want to just throw up/Just because I’m old don’t make me dead inside.”  He is so right in this brief, opening verse.  If those older audiences who listen to rock are to be stigmatized, then so should the bands who entertain audiences their age and younger.  Case in point, whether people want to believe it or not, the members of some of their favorite bands new and old alike are either 30 or older, with patches of gray showing in their hair or nothing but gray.  Hazard continues his defiance, singing, “Please don’t bring me down/Just because you don’t want to be around us/Your idea of fun is always keeping me out on the run/As long as we can walk and talk and lay waste solos from the crotch/Oh, time will tell when we break down/Oh, gimme the final round.”  Now given, the mention of the solos from the crotch maybe could have been worded a little differently, but what Hazard is talking about here is how guitarists perform on stage, guitars pointed straight out as they show off their skills.  True, it is something of a fallic symbol in that note, but the overall point is not to make a sexual comment, but rather, to point out, there is still life in any rocker, no matter how old.  It is a welcome statement that again, needs to be put out there considering the stigma that sadly still exists about older people being fans of rock and metal.  It is just one more example of how the album’s lyrical themes prove so important to its presentation.  ‘Sorry’ is yet another key example of the importance of the album’s lyrical content.

The information provided with the album states that this song is about people who basically pay lip service to others when they apologize for doing something, not actually being sorry in the process.  This will resonate with any listener for certain.  Hazard does well in examining this issue as he sings late in the song, “When people tell you they’re sorry/But they just can’t get it right/When people tell you they’re sorry/Do you believe them or let it slide?”  It is hard so often to know who is sincere when they apologize.  It has always been this critic’s belief that if someone is truly sorry for something, that person will make the effort to change so said issues do not arise again, not just keep doing the same thing over and over.  So Hazard’s question of “Do you believe them or let it slide” rings home for this critic even more.  It is certain to do much the same with any listener, too.  This is especially the case as Hazard makes note of sitting on a crumbling house of cards built on a stack of lies.  Those lies are the false apologies delivered by those noted insincere people.  Considering the thoughts and emotions expressed here, it makes the song’s lyrical content that much more accessible and engaging.  To that end, it is yet another example of what makes the record’s lyrical themes so important.  When it is considered along with the other themes examined here and those in the rest of the record’s featured songs, the whole makes clear why the lyrical content in this record is just as important to the album as the album’s musical arrangements.  Moving on from here, there is one more item to examine about the album.  That last item is the album’s production.

The production that went into Tear Down Your Idols is so important to examine because of the energy in each song and the subtle differences in each of the arrangements in their sounds and stylistic approaches.  Thanks to the work put into the album in terms of its production, those subtle variances in the arrangements are just audible enough that audiences who actively listen to the record will catch them and remain fully engaged and entertained in the album.  What’s more, with the noted blend of guitar rock and punk audible in each arrangement, the production expertly balanced the two leanings from one song to the next, bringing out the best in each song in the process.  This works with the noted variations in each arrangement to further show the importance of the production to the record’s presentation.  When the successful production is considered along with the overall content, all three elements join to make Tear Down Your Idols an enjoyable addition to this year’s field of new independent albums.

Dirtbag Republic’s new album, Tear Down Your Idols is a presentation that will appeal widely among rock and punk audiences.  That is proven in part through its featured musical arrangements.  The arrangements blend influences of both noted realms in each song, expertly balancing them and putting in some subtle variations from song to song to make them reason in themselves to hear the album.  The lyrical themes that accompany the song’s musical arrangements are also of note because of their unique topics and accessibility.  The record’s production puts the finishing touch to the presentation, ensuring all of the most minute nuances work together to complete the record’s picture.  Each item noted is important in itso nw way to the whole of th record’s production.  All things considered, they make Tear Down Your Idols an interesting addition to this year’s field of new independent and rock albums.

Tear Down Your Idols is available now.  More information on the album is available along with all of Dirtbag Republic’s latest news at:

Website: https://dirtbagrepublic.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dirtbagrepublic

Twitter: https://twitter.com/dirtbagrepublic

To keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.  

The Fifth’s Self-Titled EP Will Appeal To Classic, Guitar Rock Purists Alike

Courtesy: Head First Entertainment

Independent rock band The Fifth is scheduled to independently release its new, self-titled EP Friday.  The five-song record is a positive first outing for the band.  That is especially the case for audiences who are fans of the pure, guitar-driven rock that bridged the late 80s and early 90s.  Each item will be discussed in itself.  The record’s production rounds out its most important elements and will also be discussed later.  Each item noted is important in its own right to the whole of the EP.  All things considered, they make the EP a successful new presentation that The Fifth’s established audiences and targeted listeners will agree deserves high marks.

The Fifth’s forthcoming self-titled EP is a presentation that will find wide appeal among the band’s established audiences and more casual rock purists.  That is proven in part through the record’s featured musical arrangements.  The arrangements in question exhibit the kind of pure, guitar-driven styles and sounds that bridged the late 80s and 90s.  Their collective sound and stylistic approaches lend themselves to comparison to works from the band’s fellow North Carolina-based rock band Faith & Scars.  Right from the record’s outset, audiences get an arrangement in ‘Shake Little Sister’ that is just as comparable to works from the likes of Motley Crue and Poison, what with the operatic vocals, the rich guitar line and just as bombastic drums.  ‘Home,’ with its more subdued approach, is its own familiar style composition that again throws back to days gone by.  Meanwhile, a track, such as ‘Coming to Get You,’ in its blues-based presentation is so similar to so many rock songs that were popular in the early 90s and are still just as popular today.  To that end, it is more proof of the appeal that the record’s musical arrangements generate.  That is even clearer when this and the other arrangements noted here are considered with the two others not directly examined.  All things considered, they leave no doubt that the record’s musical content will engage and entertain audiences.  It is just one part of what makes the record successful.  The lyrical content that accompanies the record’s musical arrangements makes for its own appeal.

The lyrical content that is featured in The Fifth takes on a variety of topics.  The EP’s opener, ‘Shake Little Sister,’ is as the title notes, a song about a man who is admiring a woman.  ‘Calm Before The Storm’ seems to be a commentary about a broken relationship, but in this case not so much romantic, but plutonic.  There is something in the way that front man Roy Cathey sings about people’s paths never crossing again.  The sense of foreboding that Cathey seems to paint in the song’s opening verse paints toward that inference just as much and continues as he sings that “I know things will never be the same.”  There do not seem to be any real allusions here to a romantic relationship, but rather to the impact of the past on the present and future.  This is all this critic’s interpretation, of course.  Regardless, it suffices to say that this song is not about a broken relationship, but something quite opposite.  The contemplative ‘Home’ comes across as one of those familiar themes of someone looking back at life and where life is going.  Reaching back to the musical aspect, the song’s arrangement is one of those over the top hard rock ballads that was so beloved in the 80s, matching the big hair of the age.  Cathey sings here about letting go of those memories from the past and moving forward, again showing the theme of that rumination.  That and the musical approach together is sure to connect with a wide range of audiences.  ‘Coming to Get You’ meanwhile is another song that is about a man who is obsessed with a woman.  Considering that the band has already touched on this topic in the EP’s opener, it is a familiar topic.  It is just presented in a different fashion than in ‘Shake Little Sister.’  On yet another note, ‘Roll The Bones’ (not to be confused with the song made famous by Rush) takes audiences in yet another direction.  This is just a song whose lyrical content is full of swagger and energy.  It’s just a full on celebratory song about going out and having a good time with friends.  Looking back through all of this, it is clear that the band touches on a relatively wide range of items that are still in themselves accessible to audiences.  That overall accessibility along with the arrangements’ accessibility makes the album’s overall content reason enough to hear this EP.  The content is only part of what makes the record worth hearing.  The EP’s production brings everything together and completes the record’s presentation.

The production that went into The Fifth is important to address because of the different sounds and energies in each composition.  As noted, a song, such as ‘Home’ is one of those familiar contemplative rock ballads from the 80s that starts off subdued, but eventually crescendos in its solo.  That means that from beginning to end, full attention had to be paid to each musician’s performance.  The softer moments early on had to have the fullest impact as did the bigger, bombastic solo and finale.  Every bit of it all was expertly balanced throughout, leading the song to be a favorite among any listener.  On another note, the edge of ‘Coming To Get You’ required a different approach in the production.  That is because of the aforementioned swagger that is exhibited through the song.  Particular attention had to be paid not necessarily just to the guitar line here as a result, but just as much to the nuances in the effects used therein to really bring out that edge.  Again, the attention to detail paid off here just as much as in any other song.  It really brings out the confidence in Cathey’s vocals and even in the guitar line.  Much the same can be said of the attention to the bass and drums, too.  Each couldn’t just be a rich presentation, but had to have certain emphasis on specific notes and beats to really enhance the song’s presentation even more.  The attention to that detail paid off just as much.  It is just one more example of what makes the EP’s production stand out.  When the overall production is considered together with the EP’s content, the whole of the record proves to be fully successful.

The Fifth’s forthcoming self-titled EP is a successful new presentation from the independent rock band.  Its success comes in part through its featured musical arrangements.  The arrangements stand out in their distinct 80s and 90s pure guitar rock approach.  From the familiar rock ballad styles of the 80s to the harder edged stuff, and more, there is plenty for audiences of said sounds to enjoy.  The lyrical themes that accompany the EP’s musical arrangements are also of note.  That is because they are just as familiar and accessible as the record’s musical arrangements.  The production that went into the EP’s creation brings everything together and completes the presentation, making sure that its general effect is as pleasing as its content.  Each item examined is important in its own way to the whole of this record.  All things considered, they make the EP a positive new offering from the band.

The Fifth is scheduled for release Friday.  More information on the EP is available along with the band’s latest news at:

Website: https://reverbnation.com/thefifth

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thefifthmusic

To keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.  

Antisaint’s Debut Album Is A Strong, Positive Indicator Of The Band’s Future

Courtesy: Head First Entertainment

Everyone has, at one point or another, reached a point in life in which the need for a personal rebirth of sorts is needed.  We reach that point in our careers, for instance, in which we realize we have plateaued and we need to begin anew.  We all reach that point even in our personal lives when we need to start over.  Such is the case of the independent hard rock band Antisaint.  Formerly known as Red Tide Rising, the band reached that point more than a year ago after its members made some revelations of their own about the band’s direction.  Friday, the band officially saw its own rebirth culminated with the release of its new/debut album, Vaticinate.  The 16-song record, which is – according to the band – three separate EPs collected into one presentation, is a solid new beginning for Antisaint.  That is proven from beginning to end through its musical and lyrical content.  ‘I.D.,’ one of the album’s early entries, serves well to support the noted statement.  It will be discussed shortly.  ‘Incomplete,’ one of the album’s singles, is another way in which the album’s content shows the record’s overall strength.  It will be discussed a little later.  The same can be said of ‘Feed The Crows,’ the album’s second single.  It will also be discussed later.  Each song noted does more than its share to show what makes Vaticinate a strong new beginning for Antisaint.  When they are considered along with the rest of the album’s entries, the whole makes the album one of the year’s top new hard rock and metal offerings.  Additionally, it shows Antisaint as potentially one of the next big names in the hard rock community as long as the album gets the right support.

Antisaint’s debut album, Vaticinate, is a strong first outing for the band formerly known as Red Tide Rising.  The 16-song record’s success is exhibited from beginning to end through its musical and lyrical content alike.  ‘I.D.,’ which comes early in the album’s run is just one of the ways in which this is proven.  The song presents a musical arrangement that is just full on hard rock.  The plodding opening bars set the stage well before transitioning into the equally engaging verses.  Even being contemplative in nature, the heaviness in the verses ensures listeners’ engagement and entertainment.  The contrast of that approach to the far heavier, fiery choruses enhances the song’s presentation even more.  The whole of those aspects makes the arrangement a powerful statement in itself here, and just one part of what makes the song stand out.  The song’s lyrical theme adds its own punch to the whole.

The lyrical theme featured in this song comes across as a commentary about people making sure they really know themselves.  This is made clear in the song’s chorus, which asks, “Who the f*** are you?/I don’t think you know.”  The mention of “understanding who we really are” leading into the verses adds even more to that seeming message along with the discussions on realizing certain things about ourselves as time passes.  There is also a mention of humans “starving for connection” at another point in the song from what can be deciphered sans lyrics to reference.  Considering all of what can be deciphered, the whole really increasingly comes across as a statement about people realizing their place, and the importance of who they are.  This existential concept is not new to the world of rock, but the manner in which the band has presented that commentary is unique.  When it is considered along with the song’s musical arrangement, the whole makes clear why this song is a solid example of all that Vaticinate has to offer audiences.  It is just one of the songs that shows what makes the album so successful, too.  ‘Incomplete,’ one of the album’s singles, is another example of the album’s strength.

‘Incomplete’ boasts a heavy song that is similar to works from the likes of Seether, Three Days Grace, and others of that ilk in regards to its stylistic approach and sound. That is made evident through the use of the bass and drums, which really serve as the song’s foundation, and the guitars, which add their own depth to the work.  The vocals work so well with the instrumentation here to make the whole an immediate fit for any mainstream active rock radio programmer’s play list.  It is just one part of what makes this song stand out.  The lyrical theme that accompanies this rich, heavy arrangement makes for its own share of engagement.

According to comment from front man Matt Whiteman, the song’s lyrical theme delivers a message of frustration and determination.

“’Incomplete’ is about being looked down upon and judged by others for pursuing a purpose in life that they do not understand themselves,” said Whiteman. “It is a common occurrence to have when pursuing a creative lifestyle. People constantly criticize and belittle artists’ creations without even thinking about what it takes to have the courage to make something original and put it out into the world. The end of the song is a rally to other people in our position to not give into the doubt and pressure, take the half that they can’t see and make it whole.”  Considering this deep rumination, the fire in the song’s musical arrangement makes more sense and pairs that much better with the statement.  The whole makes the song even clearer as to why it was chosen as a single and as to why this album succeeds so well.  It is just one more example of what makes the album worth hearing.  ‘Feed The Crows,’ another of its singles, is yet another example of that strength.

‘Feed The Crows’ presents a sound and stylistic approach that is more akin to works from the likes of Deftones and Korn, again showing a certain mainstream hard rock appeal to the album.  At the same time, it shows even more, the diversity in the album’s musical arrangements, even with each being so heavy.  It shows its own identity separate from the rest of the album’s arrangements, adding even more to the appeal of the album’s musical arrangements.  The appeal of the song’s arrangement is just one aspect of what makes it so engaging and entertaining.  The lyrical theme that accompanies the song’s musical arrangement adds its own share of enjoyment to the presentation here.

The song’s lyrical theme is another that will appeal to listeners in its own right.  As Whiteman pointed out in a recent interview, “‘Feed The Crows’ was written during a low point of making the album,” he said. “The song is pure frustration and the message behind it is to say f*** it, and compromise morals to match those who have none. It’s less meaningful compared to the other songs on the album. Having said that it serves a major purpose in the TO DIGEST part of the album in which it represents the pure chaos and emotion of not being able to achieve what you wanted.”  Everyone has been at the point noted by Whiteman at least once in life if not more times.  To that end, that accessibility and ability to connect with listeners helps make the fire in the song’s arrangement make that much more sense.  The two sides together make the song in whole one more example of what makes Vaticinate so appealing.  When it is considered along with the other songs examined here and the rest of the album’s entries, the whole makes clear why the album in whole is successful.  Taking into account all of this along with the album’s title (yes, an awful pun is coming here), this album fortells a positive future for Antisaint, as long as the album and band get the coverage that they deserve.

Antisaint’s debut album, Vaticinate, is a solid new start for the band, formerly known as Red Tide Rising.  The album’s success comes through its musical and lyrical content alike.  All three of the songs examined here serve to support the noted statements.  When they are considered along with the rest of the album’s entries, the whole makes this album a solid, positive indicator of the band’s future.  Vaticinate is available now.

More information on Antisaint’s new singles and album is available along with all of the band’s latest news at:

Websitehttps://antisaintband.square.site

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/antisaintband

Twitterhttps://twitter.com/antisaintband

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.Advertisement

Pop Rock Super Group Debuts ‘Nothing To Do’ Video

Courtesy: Head First Entertainment

Pop rock super group Donna Cannone premiered the video for its new single this week.

The band — Bjorn ‘Speed’ Strid (Soilwork. The Night Flight Orchestra), Giorgia Cateri (ex-Thunder Mother), Luca D’Andria, and Tilda Nilke Nordlund — premiered the video for its new single, ‘Nothing To Do’ Friday through rockeyez.com. The song is the band’s second single on the heels of its predecessor, ‘Cross The Line.’

The video is a simple presentation. It features the band performing its new single on a rooftop as people celebrate around the quartet. Meanwhile a young woman is making her way to the celebration, ultimately making her way to the event. The whole thing ends with the camera pulling back, showing a city skyline along with the building as the sun sets behind it all.

The musical arrangement featured in the song is a surprisingly engaging and enjoyable composition. It incorporates some clear 80s pop rock influences with a touch of early to mid 90s pop rock influence, too. The whole creates a sound that audiences will find surprisingly enjoyable.

According to information provided about the song, its lyrical theme is a commentary about the negative impact of social media.

The band is quoted in a statement as saying about the song’s lyrical theme that it is about the “division, isolation and negativity created by the frenetic usage of social media. An inspiration to look at the real world and to explore friendship that might be right there, next to you.”

More information on Donna Cannone’s new single and video is available along with all of the band’s latest news at https://www.facebook.com/donnacannoneofficial.

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Syemtria Announces New Album’s Release Date

Courtesy: Tripsquad Records/O’Donnell Media Group/Head First Entertainment

Later this month, New Jersey-based metal outfit Symetria will release its latest full-length studio recording.  The eight-song record will be released independently Sept. 29 via Tripsquad Records and echoes influences from the likes of Metallica, Judas Priest, Megadeth and other similar acts that made the metal community so strong in the 80s.

Lyrically speaking, the album’s songs touch on a number of topics including addiction—as displayed in ‘Flying High,’ the seven deadly sins in ‘Vinial Sin,’ and even making the most of every day in ‘Too Late.’  The album’s full track listing is noted below.

SYMETRIA TRACK LISTING

1. Wakening

2. Flying High

3. Vinial Sin

4. All The Same

5. Stomp

6. Time

7. Too Late

8. Symetria

More information on Symetria’s new self-titled album is available online now along with all of the band’s latest news at http://www.facebook.com/symetriaband.

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.