Lady Millea’s Established Audiences, Others Will Enjoy Her Latest LP

Courtesy: Reconcile Records

The apple apparently doesn’t fall far from the tree.  That statement applies well to jazz singer Lady Millea and her latest album, I Don’t Mind Missing You.  The singer, who is the daughter of jazz singer J. Frederick Milllea, released her new album Aug. 15 alongside her father’s new album, The Big Pitch through his label, Reconcile Records.  The nine-song presentation proves itself worth watching at least once in part through its featured musical arrangements, which will be discussed shortly.  The lyrical content that accompanies the album’s musical arrangements adds its own interest to the presentation and will be discussed a little later.  The record’s production rounds out its most important items and will also be discussed later.  Each item noted is important in its own way to the whole of the presentation.  All things considered, they make I Don’t Mind Missing You a record that most jazz fans will regret missing.

Lady Millea’s recently release album, I Don’t Mind Missing You is a work that most jazz fans will not want to miss.  That is proven in part through its featured musical arrangements.  The arrangements in question are largely some quiet, but still relaxed compositions.  They are, from one to the next, easily comparable to works from the likes of Jane Monheit, Diana Krall, and other more modern female jazz vocalists along their line.  The thing to remember is that even with those stylistic comparisons in mind, the songs still boast their own identity and at least some subtle variance throughout.  Case in point is the comparison of, say, ‘Slow Healing’ to ‘My Heart Sings.’  Both songs are, again, both very easy and light in their stylistic approaches.  However, the general arrangements are unique from one another.  ‘My Heart Sings’ has a bit of a 70s easy listening influence, what with the pairing of the sax and what sounds like a vibraphone.  By comparison, ‘Slow Healing’ is more of a work, with its gentle sax line and the brushes on the snare, that conjures thoughts of old jazz clubs from the 1960s and 70s.  It really conjures thoughts of those settings, with their dim lighting and warm atmosphere.  On a completely different note, ‘Why Do I?’ – which closes out the album’s 40-minute run time – takes things in a completely different direction.  In the case of this song, it takes audiences in a more country music direction, showing yet again the subtleties in the arrangements even with their styles being so close to one another.  They each offer audiences something a little different from one to the next.  As long as audiences actively listen to the album, they will catch those subtle variances and in turn, appreciate this aspect of the album’s presentation even more.

The arrangements featured in this album are but a portion of what makes it worth hearing.  The lyrical content that accompanies the album’s musical arrangements gives audiences more reason to listen.  The lyrical content featured in this album centers on the topic of love found and lost.  What is so interesting here is the way in which Lady Millea handles the topics collectively through that lyrical content and musical arrangements.  Case in point is the album’s opener.  Lady Millea openly sings here that “Since you’ve been gone/It’s been hard to carry on/Yet losing your sweet love/Has somehow made me strong.”  This after she openly declares that “Though you’re still gone/The show must go on.”  This is clearly a song that shows a certain emotional strength from the song’s subject.  It is something that will connect with a wide range of audiences. 

On another note, a song, such as ‘The Museum’ takes the opposite track.  This is a song that is about love found.  This is made clear as Lady Millea sings here that a guy she is with is as easy to love as the woman that Van Gogh loved.  This comes as she sets up the song, saying that she ought to go to an art museum with her love interesting.  The whole thing is really a certain flirtatious approach.  That in itself will help audiences relate to the song’s lyrical side.  That together with the song’s musical arrangement will help it connect even more with listeners.

The topic of love found and lost comes up many more times in different ways throughout the course of this album.  Keeping that in mind along with the way in which the themes are presented in the examined songs, the whole makes clear why the lyrical content featured in this album will connect with audiences.  Its accessibility and that of the album’s musical arrangements strengthens the album’s presentation for Lady Millea’s targeted audiences even more.  Those items are only a portion of what those targeted audiences will appreciate about the album.  Its production rounds out its most important items.

The production that went into I Don’t Mind Missing You is important to examine because it plays directly into the album’s general effect.  Considering the subtle presentation of each song, it is clear that the fullest attention had to be paid to each song.  Those behind the boards had to make totally certain that each song’s instrumentation was perfectly balanced.  It is so easy in more subtle arrangements, for instruments to overpower one another, but that did not happen at any point here.  It ensures such a pleasant response in listeners’ minds in each song.  Keeping that in mind, the production’s effect is positive general effect.  Keeping that in mind along with the impact of the album’s overall content, the whole makes I Don’t Mind Missing You a record that Lady Millea’s most devoted fans will not want to miss.  Yes, that terrible pun was intended.

Lady Millea’s recently released album, I Don’t Mind Missing You is a presentation that her established audiences will find appealing even more than most.  That is proven in part through the album’s musical arrangements.  The arrangements generally follow a distinct stylistic mold from one to the next.  However, those who actively immerse themselves in the record will catch subtle changes in the sound from one song to the next.  In catching those subtle variations, the whole of that content will keep those audiences engaged and entertained in themselves.  The lyrical themes that accompany the album’s musical content adds its own appeal to the record because it is even more accessible than the album’s musical content.  That is considering that it follows the all too familiar topics of love found and lost.  The record’s production rounds out its most important elements, completing the presentation thanks to its positive impact on the record’s general effect.  Each item examined is important in its own way to the whole of this record.  All things considered, they make the album a presentation that Lady Millea’s established audiences will appreciate, as well as many other jazz fans.

I Don’t Mind Missing You is available now through Reconcile Records.  More information on the record is available along with all of Lady Millea’s latest news at https://www.ladymillea.com.  

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L.A. Cowboy’s Latest LP Will Get Attention From A Targeted Audience

Courtesy: Reconcile Records

Early this month, jazz artist J. Frederick Millea (a.k.a. L.A. Cowboy) released his latest album, The Big Pitch.  The eight-song record is a presentation that will appeal to a very targeted audience.  That is due in large part to the record’s sequencing. It will be discussed shortly.  The arrangements featured in the album also play into that directed appeal.  They will be discussed a little later.  The album’s lyrical content is a positive in its own right, too, and will also be discussed later.  Each item noted is important in its own way to the whole of the album.  All things considered, they make the album worth hearing at least once.

J. Frederick Millea’s latest album, The Big Pitch is a big pitch, and ultimately proves worth hearing at least once if not occasionally.  The album’s biggest strength comes from its sequencing.  The sequencing is so important because it does show at least an attempt to keep the album from becoming too redundant.  The record’s overall musical approach is that bluesy, swinging, big band jazz that was popular early in the 20th century.    What’s more, there is a near automatic comparison between Millea’s work throughout the record and that of Brian Setzer and his orchestra, who is really the most to credit for the resurgence of that genre.  From one song to the next, the songs have the same stylistic approach.  On the other hand, the sound of each song varies ever so slightly.  The sequencing takes those subtle variances into full consideration, ensuring that they are highlighted for audiences who listen closely.  On another level, for all of the similarities in the songs’ stylistic approaches, the sequencing also ensures that there is at least a pair of break points in the album.  The first comes in the form of ‘The Museum,’ which comes just past the album’s midway point.  Unlike so much of the record’s musical presentation, this song is much more relaxed.  Its gentle, flowing piano line and time keeping pairs with Millea’s equally velvety vocals to make this “slow dance” type composition a great way to change things up just enough.  The second break point comes in the album’s finale, ‘Why Do I.’  While not as reserved as ‘The Museum,’ it is still laid back in comparison to so much of the music in this record.  It is a light, springy work, driven largely by the piano, drums and vocals.  The guitar line serves more of a support role here.  Between this song and ‘The Museum,’ the pair does just enough to keep the album’s arrangements from becoming too redundant.  They are unlike one another and unlike the album’s other entries.  Keeping this and everything else noted here, it is hopefully clear how important the album’s sequencing is to its whole.  In reality, its importance is such that it really forms the album’s foundation.

Taking a closer look at the arrangements, it has already been noted that for the most part, they each follow a similar stylistic approach.  They are each familiar swinging jazz works.  They will immediately appeal to fans of said genre, and more specifically, to fans of the likes of Brian Setzer and company.  The thing is that for all of the largely familiar stylistic approach throughout the arrangements, there are subtle differences in their sound.  So even as the arrangements’ styles remain so much the same from one to the next, there are little touches that Millea and his fellow musicians add to each song.  Those who listen closely will catch those subtle variances an in turn, find more to like.  More casual audiences on the other hand are less likely to catch those variances, again showing why this aspect and the album will appeal to the specific audiences.

The lyrical content that is featured throughout the album is important to examine because of its accessibility.  Throughout the course of the album’s 34-minute record, its lyrical content focuses almost entirely on the concept of romance.  In this case, the topic is more love found than lost.  That all too familiar topic is something that in itself will connect with plenty of audiences.  The subtle variances in how the topic is approached in each song ensures the appeal among the noted audiences in its own right.  When this aspect is considered along with the variances in the arrangements, and the sequencing thereof, the whole makes The Big Pitch a record that will get to the plate for a very specific audience.

L.A. Cowboy’s recently released album, The Big Pitch is a presentation that will find appeal among a very targeted audience group.  Its appeal comes largely through its sequencing.  The sequencing ensures that the album keeps moving and reduces the chances of redundancy from the record’s beginning to its end.  On a related note, the arrangements will keep the noted audiences engaged and entertained because of the subtle variances in each composition.  Audiences who catch those subtle variances in the largely similar stylistic approaches will find that just as appealing as the album’s sequencing.  The accessibility of the album’s lyrical content works with the other items to round out the album’s presentation.  That is because it is so overwhelmingly familiar and constant throughout.  Each item examined is important in its own way to the whole of the album’s presentation.  All things considered, they make the album a presentation whose pitch will not fall entirely on deaf ears. 

The Big Pitch is available now.  More information on the album is available through Millea’s official website at https://www.lacowboy.com.  

To keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.