‘Country Music’ Will Appeal To Audiences Across The Country

Courtesy: Florentine Films/PBS/PBS Distribution

Country music is American music.  It is music that transcends generations and defies racial barriers while also garnering fans across the musical universe.  That far reach and impact of the oft-maligned genre is why famed documentarian Ken Burns made the decision recently to helm his latest project, simply titled Country Music.  Recently having aired on PBS stations nationwide, it was released on DVD and Blu-ray Sept. 17 through PBS Distribution.  The eight-disc, 16-hour documentary is a work that audiophiles and country music lovers alike will appreciate.  That appreciation is due in part to the program’s rich, expansive story of Country music’s history that is presented throughout the course of the program.  That breadth and depth of information builds a strong, solid foundation for the program.  Strengthening that foundation is the program’s bonus content featured with its home release.  The set’s packaging gives it its final touch.  Each item noted here is important in its own way to the whole of Country Music’s presentation.  All things considered, they make the documentary another successful presentation from PBS and from Ken Burns and company.  They make it yet another of the year’s top new documentaries.

PBS Distribution and Florentine Films’ new documentary Country Music is a presentation that will appeal just as much to audiophiles in general as it will to the most devoted country music aficionados.  That is due in part to the information presented through the course of the documentary’s 16-hour run time.  Audiences get plenty of history, starting at country music’s roots in the 1920s and taking them up to 1996.  Viewers learn about many of the most important figures that made Country music what it is today (E.g. Little Jimmie Dickens, Hank Williams, Jimmie Rodgers, Earl Sruggs and Lester Flatt, Charlie Pirde, Johnny cash, Loretta Lynn, Tammy Wynette, George Jones, etc.).  That is just one part of the interest, too.  Along with learning about those and other important figures, the documentary also points out why they were so pivotal to the evolution of country music. Audiences learn early on, the African roots of country and bluegrass through a discussion on the banjo. By connection, the discussion on Flatt & Scruggs reveals how Earl Scruggs’ banjo playing played into the evolution of banjo playing.  On another note, viewers learn that Jimmie Rodgers was the first country musician to develop the so-called blue yodel, and the impact that had on early country and western music.  Viewers learn of Hank Williams, his songs were written from his own personal experiences, making them so much more relatable to audiences.  That is why they are timeless works to this very day.  As if all of that is not enough, viewers learn about Bob Wills’ coupling of jazz and country to create what would go on to be called Texas Swing.  That genre would go on over time, according to the documentary, to become a standard country music subgenre from that point on.  There was also the contribution that acts, such as Kris Kristofferson and the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band made to the continued evolution of Country music during the 1960s.  They, along with the likes of Bob Dylan helped bridge folk rock and country, continuing the evolution of Country music as an art form.  Everything noted here is just a snapshot of all of the important history that is shared over the course of Country Music’s presentation.  There is far more for audiences to take in throughout the documentary that will also inform, engage and educate.  Audiences can learn for themselves just how much more is offered when they purchase this program for themselves.  The history and education offered through the documentary’s primary content is but one part of what makes the doc in whole so appealing.  The bonus content that is featured on each of the set’s eight discs adds its own appeal to the program.

The bonus content featured throughout the course of Country Music adds its own share of education and entertainment.  Riannon Giddens (ex-Carolina Chocolate Drops) discusses in one of the many bonuses included in the set, overcoming stereotypes and racial biases.  She also discusses the combination of various country and bluegrass styles that are prevalent in North Carolina.  In another of the many interesting bonus discussions featured in the program’s presentation, Nitty Gritty Dirt Band member John McEuen takes to discussing music theory at one point, comparing the composition style of Johann Sebastian Bach to a distinct style of picking on the banjo.  How’s that for a comparison?  That in itself shows even more the legitimacy of Country music.  Charlie Daniels offers his own music theory discussion as he talks about how he came up with the musical and lyrical presentation of his hit song ‘The Devil Went Down To Georgia.’  That discussion proves rather enlightening in its own right.  In another example of the importance of the bonus content featured in this set, Mel Tillis, yet another Country music legend, joins Kenny Rogers (yet another Country music legend) to talk about the creation of the song ‘Ruby, Don’t Take Your Love To Town.’  Alice Randall adds her own comments to the discussion, noting its place in the bigger picture of patriotic and protest songs during the 1960s.  It is just one more key discussion that is featured in the whole of Country Music.  There are far more bonuses than available time and space to discuss.  Keeping that in mind, that content and the content discussed here collectively shows with ease, the role that the set’s bonus content plays to its presentation.  When that collective content is considered along with the breadth and depth of the set’s primary content, the whole of all of that content makes the set’s overall presentation such that, again, is a very far-reaching work and will appeal to a wide range of viewers.

The combined primary and secondary content that makes up the body of Country Music goes a long way toward making this recently released collection appealing to audiences.  For all that it does to make the set so appealing, it is collectively just one part of what makes the set a positive work.  The set’s packaging plays its own important part to the collection’s whole.  Audiences will note that the eight discs that make up the set’s whole are spread across two separate boxes, four to a box.  The discs are placed on their own spot within their respective cases, protecting the discs from marring one another and themselves.  That approach also serves to save space on audiences’ DVD and BD racks.  That is even despite the use of two separate cases to hold the discs.

Adding to the interest of the packaging is that the back of each case features an in-depth summary for each episode.  That element, though mainly aesthetic, does a lot to add to the set’s appeal because it allows viewers to much more easily choose which disc they want to play.  That means not having to put in the disc and search through each disc to find out the subject of each episode.  Those responsible for the addition of this element are to be highly commended for their efforts.  When this is considered along with the more “mechanical” aspect of the packaging, the whole of the packaging becomes that much more integral to the whole of Country Music’s presentation.  When it is considered along with the set’s overall content, all elements considered make even more clear why this presentation is so impressive.  All things considered, they make clear that Country Music is one of 2019’s top new documentaries and DVD/BD box sets.  It should be noted that there is some foul language used at points, so while it is mostly family friendly, there is some not so family friendly content.  To that end, the set will go to critics’ lists of the top new grown-up DVD and BD box sets.  Other than that one aspect, there are no other negatives to the whole of Country Music.

Country Music, the latest documentary from Director Ken Burns and Florentine Films, is one of this year’s top new documentaries and top new box sets for grown-ups.  That is due in part to the combined primary and secondary content that makes up the body of the set.  The set’s packaging plays its own important part to the whole of the box.  Each item noted is key in its own way to the whole of Country Music.  All things considered, they make this set a presentation that will appeal widely to audiophiles in general just as much as it will to the most devoted country music aficionados.  It is available now.  More information on this and other titles from PBS Distribution is available at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.pbsdistribution.org

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/PBSDistribution.org

 

 

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PBS Distribution To Release ‘Country Music’ Docu-Series Tuesday

Courtesy: PBS Distribution/PBS

PBS’ new hugely touted Ken Burns presentation is scheduled to air on PBS nationwide Sunday night.

The docu-series will be available on DVD and Blu-ray next week, too.  It is scheduled for release Sept. 17 on DVD and Blu-ray.  The program, directed by Burns, takes listeners through the history of country music, going all the way back to its beginnings in the 1920s and all the way to the 1990s.

The story is presented through stories of County Music greats, such as Merle Haggard, Dolly Parton, Willie Nelson and Patsy Cline.  The program examines the ballads, hymns and blues compositions along with the noted stories to help tell the story of Country Music.

Along with directing the program, Burns also produced the series alongside Dayton Duncan and Julie Dunfrey.  Duncan also wrote the story.

Country Music runs 16 hours over a spread of eight discs.  It will retail for MSRP of $99.99 (DVD) and $129.99 (Blu-ray), but is available at reduced prices of $74.99 (DVD) and $99.99 (Blu-ray) through PBS’ online store.  More information on this and other titles from PBS is available online now at:

 

Website: http://www.pbs.org

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pbs

Twitter: http://twitter.com/pbs

 

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PBS’ Vietnam War Docu-Series Is A Timeless Look At A Critical Conflict

Courtesy: PBS/Public Media Distribution

The clock is ticking on the year.  In a little more than 24 hours, 2017 will finally winding down and the world will be looking forward to 2018.  Before those final hours pass by, there’s still work to be done from Phil’s Picks in the year-ender department.  That work includes year-enders for the year’s top new box sets for grown-up audiences.  In saying grown-ups, that does not necessarily mean solely that the material is inappropriate for younger viewers, but that it might simply not appeal to younger viewers because of the issue of their ability to relate to the material in question.

PBS and Shout! Factory dominate this critic’s list this year with a rather wide array of titles with PBS’ new miniseries doc The Vietnam War taking top honors.  Whether or not one is a military or even history buff, this set is a must see.  Period.  The fourth season of PBS’ British import crime drama Endeavour is also on the list alongside new releases such as Shout! Factory’s Green AcresThe Complete SeriesThe Good PlaceSeason 1 and Ernie Kovacs retrospective Take A Good Look.  Smithsonian Channel even gets some nods with the first two seasons of Air Warriors and the first season of Sports Detectives.  Even mpi Media Group’s Gerry Anderson collection The Lost Worlds of Gerry Anderson is on this critic’s list.

As with every previous list from Phil’s Picks, this list features this critic’s Top 10 New Grown-Up Box Sets plus five additional honorable mention titles for a total of 15 titles.  Developing this list was anything but easy, but every title included was well deserving of its place in the list.  that being said, here for your consideration is Phil’s Picks 2017 Top 10 New Grown-Up DVD/BD Box Sets.

PHIL’S PICKS 2017 TOP 10 NEW GROWN-UP DVDs/BDs

  1. The Vietnam WarA Film By Ken Burns and Lynn Novick
  2. EndeavourSeason 4
  3. Green AcresThe Complete Series
  4. Sports DetectivesSeason 1
  5. Mystery Science Theater 3000 Vol. XXXVIII
  6. Mystery Science Theater 3000 Vol. XXXIX
  7. Ernie KovacsTake A Good Look
  8. The Good PlaceSeason 1
  9. The Lost Worlds of Gerry Anderson
  10. Air WarriorsSeason 1
  11. Air WarriorsSeason 2
  12. Just Shoot MeThe Complete Series
  13. Ned & StaceyThe Complete Series
  14. IceSeason 1
  15. From Dusk Till DawnSeason 3

That’s it for this list, but still not it for this year’s new DVD and BD titles.  Still up for grabs are spots on Phil’s PIcks 2017 Top 10 New Family DVD/BD Box Sets.  That list is nearly compiled and will be posted ASAP, so stay tuned!

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

PBS Announces Release Date For Ken Burns’ Latest Documentary Series

Courtesy: PBS/Public Media Distribution

Ken Burns and PBS have partnered to release the famed documentarian’s latest offering on DVD and Blu-ray late this summer.

Ken Burns: The Vietnam War will be released Tuesday, Sept. 19 on DVD and Blu-ray.  The 1,080-minute (18-hours) program examines the conflict in a previously untold fashion with interviews from almost 100 witnesses and uses rarely-seen, digitally re-mastered footage from historic news broadcasts, home movies and audio recordings from the Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon administrations.

Audiences can see a preview of the program online now here.

Lynn Novick, who co-directed and produced the documentary alongside Burns and fellow co-producer Sarah Botstein, said some surprising revelations were made over the decade in which The Vietnam War was created.

“We are all searching for some meaning in this terrible tragedy.  Ken and I have tried to shed new light on the war by looking at it from the bottom up, the top down and from all sides,” Novick said.  “In addition to dozens of Americans who shared their stories, we interviewed many Vietnamese on both the winning and losing sides, and were surprised to learn that the war remains as painful and unresolved for them as it is for us.  Within this almost incomprehensibly destructive event, we discovered profound, universal human truths, as well as uncanny resonances with recent events.”

Burns agreed, adding it remains a divisive topic even four decades after Saigon fell.

“The Vietnam War was a decade of agony that took the lives of more than 58,000 Americans,” Burns said.  “Not since the Civil War have we as a country been so torn apart.  There wasn’t an American alive then who wasn’t affected in some way – from those who fought and sacrificed in the war to families of service members of POWs, to those who protested the war in open conflict with their government and fellow citizens.  More than 40 years after it ended, we can’t forget Vietnam, and we are still arguing about why it went wrong, who was to blame and whether it was all worth it.”

Courtesy: PBS/Public Media Distribution

This latest offering from Burns and company also features new music composed by famed Academy Award®-winning producers Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross.  Reznor has also won numerous awards and accolades as the creative force behind Nine Inch Nails.

It offers more than 100 minutes of bonus material, too, including a 45-minute preview program, two programs focusing on contemporary lives of two people involved in the conflict and much more.

As if that expanse of bonus material is not enough, the program, which will air on PBS stations nationwide between Sept. 17 – 21 and Sept. 24 – 28, a companion outreach and public engagement program – provided by PBS stations nationwide – aimed at giving communities the chance to take part in a national discussion about the war.

A website and educational initiative will also be launched online at PBS Learning Media aimed at engaging teachers and students everywhere about the war.

The program spans 10 discs on both platforms and will retail for MSRP of $99.99 on DVD and $129.99 on Blu-ray.  It will also be available via digital download. The sets can be pre-ordered online now at discounted prices of $94.99 (DVD) and $124.99 (Blu-ray).

A companion standalone book is also available for order for $59.99.  The book and box sets can be pre-ordered online now via PBS’ online store along with complete sets that include the box sets and book.

More information on this and other titles from Ken Burns and PBS is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.pbs.org/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pbs

Twitter: http://twitter.com/pbs

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Ken Burns’ Latest PBS Presentation Is The “Champion” Of Phil’s Picks’ 2016 Top 10 New Documentaries List

Courtesy:  PBS/PBS Distribution

Courtesy: PBS/PBS Distribution

2016 was another great year for documentaries.  From ancient kings to movie magic kings and much more, the field of documentaries had plenty to offer audiences.  Believe it or not PBS showed again with its offerings why it remains the king of the documentary field and why it is the last true bastion of truly worthwhile programming on television.  It wasn’t the only outlet that offered quality documentaries this year, though.  Virgil Films and MVD Visual both had some stand out offerings, too.  Their films are included in this critic’s list of the year’s best new documentaries.

Topping this year’s list of the year’s top new documentaries is Ken Burns’ new profile of MLB great Jackie Robinson.  It isn’t the first of its kind by any means.  But it is one of the most in-depth profiles of the baseball legend.  Also included in this year’s list is a profile of another legend in his own right, Ray Harryhausen from MVD Visual in the form of Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan.  It isn’t the first of its kind, either. But its story, interviews, footage, information and editing all combine to make this presentation stand out.  There is even a pair of documentaries on the “timeless” cinema classic Back to the Future included in this list.

As with each of Phil’s Picks “Best Of” lists, this list features this critic’s top 10 choices in the given category along with five honorable mention titles for a total of 15 titles.  So without any further ado, here for you is Phil’s Picks’ 2016 Top 10 New Documentaries

 

PHIL’S PICKS 2016 TOP 10 NEW DOCUMENTARIES

 

  1. Ken Burns’ Jackie Robinson

 

  1. American Experience: Space Men

 

  1. American Experience: Tesla

 

  1. Nature: Natural Born Hustlers

 

  1. Secrets of the Dead: Cleopatra’s Lost Tomb

 

  1. Secrets of the Dead: Teotihuacan’s Lost Kings

 

  1. Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan

 

  1. American Experience: Bonnie & Clyde

 

  1. Nature: Super Hummingbirds

 

  1. Nature: Moose Life of a Twig Eater

 

  1. NOVA: Vikings Unearthed

 

  1. OUTATIME: Saving The DeLorean Time Machine

 

  1. Back in Time

 

  1. Building Star Trek

 

  1. Zydeco Crossroads: A Tale of Two Cities

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Ken Burns, PBS Hit A Home Run With New Jackie Robinson Retrospective

Courtesy:  PBS/PBS Distribution

Courtesy: PBS/PBS Distribution

Sixty-nine years ago this year Jackie Robinson became the first African-American to join the ranks of Major League Baseball.  When he first signed on with the then Brooklyn Dodgers he did more than just break down a color barrier.  He became an important catalyst for change in America.  He opened the door for countless other African-American baseball players.  He also served as an example for so many civil rights activists around the nation.  He was Rocky before there was Rocky.  He was Atlas on Earth.  In the decades since he first picked up bat and ball, no fewer than two big screen features have been crafted about him, the most recent being 2013’s 42.  Major League Baseball even stops to honor his legacy every year on what has become known as “Jackie Robinson Day.”  Any number of documentaries has been produced about him and his legacy, too.  The thing is that few have ever focused on anything more than his career on the field.  Enter documentarian Ken Burns and his new Robinson retrospective, simply titled Jackie Robinson.  The four-hour presentation is not the first on which Burns has partnered with PBS.  He has also produced documentaries on the history of baseball in America, Jazz, and perhaps his most well-known documentary, The Civil War.  This production is no less enjoyable than his previous offerings.  As a matter of fact it is more proof of why Burns is one of the leading names in his field and why PBS still stands today the last bastion of truly worthwhile programming on television.  Its story is the main element in supporting both arguments.  That will be discussed shortly.  The elements that were used to help advance the story are just as important to note.  That will be discussed later.  The bonus material that is included with the program in its new home release round out the program’s presentation.  Each element proves clearly important in its own way to the program.  Altogether they make Jackie Robinson one of the year’s best new sports documentaries and one of the year’s top new overall documentaries.

Ken Burns’ new documentary centering on legendary baseball player Jackie Robinson is one of this year’s best new sports documentaries and one of the year’s best new overall documentaries, too.  It is more proof as to why Burns is one of the leaders in his field.  In the same vein, it is also more proof as to why PBS still stands today as the last bastion of truly worthwhile programming on television.  The program’s central story proves both arguments.  Unlike so many Robinson retrospectives that have come before, this presentation focuses on more than just Robinson’s on-field impact.  Yes, that is there.  But it also focuses on Robinson’s lifeafter baseball.  That portion of the program is just as eye-opening as the rest of the presentation.  Audiences will be surprised to learn that after leaving baseball, Robinson had quite the career change.  He transitioned into the private sector, joining the coffee company Chock Full O’ Nuts.  He also became quite active in the political realm, even shocking many as a supporter of Richard Nixon.  That discussion is one of the program’s most intriguing considering Nixon’s record on civil rights.  Though, interestingly enough, it is also revealed that JFK wasn’t exactly a supporter of civil rights early on, either.  This is just a tiny portion of what makes the program’s story so enthralling.  The story of his career and impact on the field is just as in-depth as the story of his life away from the ball field.
The story of Robinson’s life off the field is in itself very enlightening.  It displays a part of Robinson’s life that is rarely if ever discussed by other documentaries.  It is just part of what makes hits program’s story so engaging.  The story of Robinson’s career and impact on the field is just as important to the story’s whole as its second half.  Most audiences know Robinson from his days as a member of the Brooklyn Dodgers.  But as audiences learn in the first half of the documentary, his time with the Dodgers wasn’t his first professional baseball experience.  He started in the Negro League before moving on to the Montreal Royals, the Dodgers’ then top AAA team.  In other words, it shows that Robinson’s time in the spotlight might have started in 1947, but his impact was being made felt long before then.  William Branch Rickey’s support of Robinson is equally powerful to note.  Viewers will be interested to learn here of the close relationship between the pair.  It was more mentor/student than owner/player.  There was a reason that Rickey only let Robinson speak his mind after had had truly established himself.  He wasn’t trying to make Robinson a “good black man.”  Rather, he was helping Robinson prove himself to the country.  Because of that, Robinson did indeed change people’s views, essentially—again—making himself Rocky decades before there was Rocky.  Both the story of Robinson’s life and career on the field and off are important in their own right to the story of Jackie Robinson.  Collectively, they show the program’s central story is key to the program’s presentation.  They are only a portion of what makes the story in whole so engaging.  The elements that were used to tell the story are just as important to note in the story’s success.

The story at the heart of Ken Burns’ new Jackie Robinson documentary in itself shows why it is a wholly engaging piece for history buffs and baseball history buffs alike.  That is because it presents not just Robinson’s career and impact on the field, but off of the field, too.  As engaging as the story is in itself, the elements that were used to help tell Robinson’s story are just as important to note as his story.  The elements in question involve vintage footage from Robinson’s playing days and his post-baseball life and photos that are just as old.  Most important to note are the interviews that are used to help illustrate Robinson’s story.  Burns interviewed a number of academics and sports writers to help make clear the importance of Robinson’s accomplishments and other things that he did both on and off the field.  He also interviewed a number of Robinson’s former teammates, his widow, and his daughter in connection with the story.  The first-hand accounts that are shared by all involved make even richer the profile of Robinson painted by the story.  They make Robinson even more of a sympathetic figure.  That is because they collectively show the odds that he faced not just from whites but eventually even other African-Americans.  That included not only his fellow ball players but fans and other members of the African-American community.  Despite people’s view of him he still stood his ground and stood for what he believed in.  Hearing those stories from those that knew him best serves to make the overall picture painted in this program all the richer and more valuable both for history buffs and baseball history buffs.  It’s just one more way in which Jackie Robinson proves itself to be one of the year’s best new sports documentaries and best new documentaries overall.  It still is not the last way in which this presentation proves itself so entertaining and engaging.  The bonus material that is included in the program is just as valuable to the program as its story and the elements that advance the story.

The story at the center of Jackie Robinson and the elements used to advance the story are both important in their own right to the whole of this documentary.  While both are equally important in keeping audiences engaged and entertained, they are not the program’s only important elements.  Now that Jackie Robinson is available on DVD and Blu-ray it also includes a small handful of bonus features.  Audiences get a glimpse into an inner city baseball team known as The Anderson Monarchs in one of those features.  The team is made up largely of African American youths.  The team members discuss the relation of the team’s name to Robinson’s own history.  One of the team’s members—Mon’e Davis—will be very familiar to many viewers.  She discusses being the only female on the team and how that related to Robinson being the only African-American on his team originally.  This is just one of the bonuses included in Jackie Robinson’s home release.  There are also some little outtakes to enjoy and the most important of the program’s bonuses, “A conversation with the filmmakers.”  This program features discussions with Ken Burns and others who worked on Jackie Robinson.  Burns and company share their thoughts on the importance of making this documentary in this feature as well as what Robinson’s accomplishments mean to them personally.  Most notable of the comments shared throughout this feature is the sentiment that Robinson’s widow and daughter had to be included in the presentation.  Every person interviewed noted that it would be wrong to not include her.  Looking back on the program audiences will find themselves agreeing with that sentiment.  She shares some of the deepest insight of anyone interviewed for the end product.  All in all the discussions that are shared in the “conversation with the filmmakers” offer just as much insight and interest to Jackie Robinson as its central story and the elements that advance and illustrate that story.  All things considered, the documentary proves in the end to be more proof of why Ken Burns is one of the leaders in his field.  They also serve to make this documentary more proof of why PBS is the last bastion of truly worthwhile programming on television today.

Ken Burns’ Jackie Robinson is one of this year’s best new sports documentaries and one of the year’s best new documentaries overall.  It shows once again why Ken Burns is one of the leading names in his field and why PBS is the last bastion of truly worthwhile programming on television.  That is because it paints a picture through its story that far outshines the biopics and other documentaries centered on his life and career.  The elements that are used to illustrate and advance the story help solidify that argument, too.  They include first-hand interviews with those closest to Robinson during his life and those that have quite a deep knowledge of him.  The bonus material that has been included in the program’s home release rounds out the program’s overall presentation.  It shows in its own way to be just as important as the program’s story and related elements.  By itself, each element proves to be hugely important to Jackie Robinson’s presentation.  Altogether they show why every history buff and sports history buff should see this most in-depth Robinson retrospective to date.  It is available now on DVD and Blu-ray and can be ordered online direct via PBS’ online store at http://www.shoppbs.org/search/index.jsp?kwCatId=&kw=jackie%20robinson&origkw=jackie+robinson&sr=1.  More on this and other titles from PBS is available online now at:

 

 

Website: http://www.pbs.org

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pbs

Twitter: http://twitter.com/PBS

 

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

PBS To Release New Ken Burns Documentary This Spring

Courtesy:  PBS/PBS Distribution

Courtesy: PBS/PBS Distribution

This spring PBS and PBS Distribution will release a brand new documentary from acclaimed documentarian Ken Burns.

PBS and PBS Distribution will release Ken Burns’ new documentary Jackie Robinson this spring. The four-hour documentary will be released on April 15th. The timing of the double-disc set, which will be presented both on DVD and Blu-ray, is wholly intentional as it will coincide with Jackie Robinson Day. It follows the life and career of the famed baseball star and the impact that he had both on the diamond and off. That impact is highlighted through discussions from the likes of famed newsman Tom Brokaw, singers Carly Simon and Harry Belafonte, and even President Barack Obama and his wife Michelle Obama among others.

Jackie Robinson is not the first time that Burns has delved in to the baseball world having helmed his documentary Baseball in 1994. In discussing the film Burns explained that the film came from a desire to focus more closely on Robinson after having helmed that docu-series. “Jackie Robinson is the most important figure in our nation’s most important game,” he said. “He gave us our first lasting progress in civil rights since the Civil War and, ever since I finished my BASEBALL series in 1994, I’ve been eager to make a stand-alone film about the life of this courageous American. There was so much more to say not only about Robinson’s barrier-breaking moment in 1947, but about how his upbringing shaped his intolerance for any form of discrimination and how after his baseball career, he spoke out tirelessly against racial injustice, even after his star had begun to dim.”  Audiences can hear Burns discuss his new film at more length in an interview on CBS’ Face The Nation via YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KUawlPAl5vA.

Jackie Robinson was co-directed by Ken Burns, Sarah Burns, and David McMahon. It will be available on Tuesday, April 15th and will be released both on DVD and Blu-ray. The program’s double-disc DVD presentation will retail for MSRP of $24.99 and the double-disc Blu-ray presentation for $29.99. It will also be available in a number of combo packages, from which audiences can choose online and pre-order at http://www.shoppbs.org/search/index.jsp?kwCatId=&kw=ken%20burns%20jackie%20robinson&origkw=Ken+Burns%27+Jackie+Robinson&sr=1. More information on this and other titles from PBS is available online now at:

Website: http://www.pbs.org

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pbs

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.