PBS Announces Release Date For Ken Burns’ Latest Documentary Series

Courtesy: PBS/Public Media Distribution

Ken Burns and PBS have partnered to release the famed documentarian’s latest offering on DVD and Blu-ray late this summer.

Ken Burns: The Vietnam War will be released Tuesday, Sept. 19 on DVD and Blu-ray.  The 1,080-minute (18-hours) program examines the conflict in a previously untold fashion with interviews from almost 100 witnesses and uses rarely-seen, digitally re-mastered footage from historic news broadcasts, home movies and audio recordings from the Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon administrations.

Audiences can see a preview of the program online now here.

Lynn Novick, who co-directed and produced the documentary alongside Burns and fellow co-producer Sarah Botstein, said some surprising revelations were made over the decade in which The Vietnam War was created.

“We are all searching for some meaning in this terrible tragedy.  Ken and I have tried to shed new light on the war by looking at it from the bottom up, the top down and from all sides,” Novick said.  “In addition to dozens of Americans who shared their stories, we interviewed many Vietnamese on both the winning and losing sides, and were surprised to learn that the war remains as painful and unresolved for them as it is for us.  Within this almost incomprehensibly destructive event, we discovered profound, universal human truths, as well as uncanny resonances with recent events.”

Burns agreed, adding it remains a divisive topic even four decades after Saigon fell.

“The Vietnam War was a decade of agony that took the lives of more than 58,000 Americans,” Burns said.  “Not since the Civil War have we as a country been so torn apart.  There wasn’t an American alive then who wasn’t affected in some way – from those who fought and sacrificed in the war to families of service members of POWs, to those who protested the war in open conflict with their government and fellow citizens.  More than 40 years after it ended, we can’t forget Vietnam, and we are still arguing about why it went wrong, who was to blame and whether it was all worth it.”

Courtesy: PBS/Public Media Distribution

This latest offering from Burns and company also features new music composed by famed Academy Award®-winning producers Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross.  Reznor has also won numerous awards and accolades as the creative force behind Nine Inch Nails.

It offers more than 100 minutes of bonus material, too, including a 45-minute preview program, two programs focusing on contemporary lives of two people involved in the conflict and much more.

As if that expanse of bonus material is not enough, the program, which will air on PBS stations nationwide between Sept. 17 – 21 and Sept. 24 – 28, a companion outreach and public engagement program – provided by PBS stations nationwide – aimed at giving communities the chance to take part in a national discussion about the war.

A website and educational initiative will also be launched online at PBS Learning Media aimed at engaging teachers and students everywhere about the war.

The program spans 10 discs on both platforms and will retail for MSRP of $99.99 on DVD and $129.99 on Blu-ray.  It will also be available via digital download. The sets can be pre-ordered online now at discounted prices of $94.99 (DVD) and $124.99 (Blu-ray).

A companion standalone book is also available for order for $59.99.  The book and box sets can be pre-ordered online now via PBS’ online store along with complete sets that include the box sets and book.

More information on this and other titles from Ken Burns and PBS is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.pbs.org/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pbs

Twitter: http://twitter.com/pbs

 

 

 

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Ken Burns’ Latest PBS Presentation Is The “Champion” Of Phil’s Picks’ 2016 Top 10 New Documentaries List

Courtesy:  PBS/PBS Distribution

Courtesy: PBS/PBS Distribution

2016 was another great year for documentaries.  From ancient kings to movie magic kings and much more, the field of documentaries had plenty to offer audiences.  Believe it or not PBS showed again with its offerings why it remains the king of the documentary field and why it is the last true bastion of truly worthwhile programming on television.  It wasn’t the only outlet that offered quality documentaries this year, though.  Virgil Films and MVD Visual both had some stand out offerings, too.  Their films are included in this critic’s list of the year’s best new documentaries.

Topping this year’s list of the year’s top new documentaries is Ken Burns’ new profile of MLB great Jackie Robinson.  It isn’t the first of its kind by any means.  But it is one of the most in-depth profiles of the baseball legend.  Also included in this year’s list is a profile of another legend in his own right, Ray Harryhausen from MVD Visual in the form of Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan.  It isn’t the first of its kind, either. But its story, interviews, footage, information and editing all combine to make this presentation stand out.  There is even a pair of documentaries on the “timeless” cinema classic Back to the Future included in this list.

As with each of Phil’s Picks “Best Of” lists, this list features this critic’s top 10 choices in the given category along with five honorable mention titles for a total of 15 titles.  So without any further ado, here for you is Phil’s Picks’ 2016 Top 10 New Documentaries

 

PHIL’S PICKS 2016 TOP 10 NEW DOCUMENTARIES

 

  1. Ken Burns’ Jackie Robinson

 

  1. American Experience: Space Men

 

  1. American Experience: Tesla

 

  1. Nature: Natural Born Hustlers

 

  1. Secrets of the Dead: Cleopatra’s Lost Tomb

 

  1. Secrets of the Dead: Teotihuacan’s Lost Kings

 

  1. Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan

 

  1. American Experience: Bonnie & Clyde

 

  1. Nature: Super Hummingbirds

 

  1. Nature: Moose Life of a Twig Eater

 

  1. NOVA: Vikings Unearthed

 

  1. OUTATIME: Saving The DeLorean Time Machine

 

  1. Back in Time

 

  1. Building Star Trek

 

  1. Zydeco Crossroads: A Tale of Two Cities

 

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Ken Burns, PBS Hit A Home Run With New Jackie Robinson Retrospective

Courtesy:  PBS/PBS Distribution

Courtesy: PBS/PBS Distribution

Sixty-nine years ago this year Jackie Robinson became the first African-American to join the ranks of Major League Baseball.  When he first signed on with the then Brooklyn Dodgers he did more than just break down a color barrier.  He became an important catalyst for change in America.  He opened the door for countless other African-American baseball players.  He also served as an example for so many civil rights activists around the nation.  He was Rocky before there was Rocky.  He was Atlas on Earth.  In the decades since he first picked up bat and ball, no fewer than two big screen features have been crafted about him, the most recent being 2013’s 42.  Major League Baseball even stops to honor his legacy every year on what has become known as “Jackie Robinson Day.”  Any number of documentaries has been produced about him and his legacy, too.  The thing is that few have ever focused on anything more than his career on the field.  Enter documentarian Ken Burns and his new Robinson retrospective, simply titled Jackie Robinson.  The four-hour presentation is not the first on which Burns has partnered with PBS.  He has also produced documentaries on the history of baseball in America, Jazz, and perhaps his most well-known documentary, The Civil War.  This production is no less enjoyable than his previous offerings.  As a matter of fact it is more proof of why Burns is one of the leading names in his field and why PBS still stands today the last bastion of truly worthwhile programming on television.  Its story is the main element in supporting both arguments.  That will be discussed shortly.  The elements that were used to help advance the story are just as important to note.  That will be discussed later.  The bonus material that is included with the program in its new home release round out the program’s presentation.  Each element proves clearly important in its own way to the program.  Altogether they make Jackie Robinson one of the year’s best new sports documentaries and one of the year’s top new overall documentaries.

Ken Burns’ new documentary centering on legendary baseball player Jackie Robinson is one of this year’s best new sports documentaries and one of the year’s best new overall documentaries, too.  It is more proof as to why Burns is one of the leaders in his field.  In the same vein, it is also more proof as to why PBS still stands today as the last bastion of truly worthwhile programming on television.  The program’s central story proves both arguments.  Unlike so many Robinson retrospectives that have come before, this presentation focuses on more than just Robinson’s on-field impact.  Yes, that is there.  But it also focuses on Robinson’s lifeafter baseball.  That portion of the program is just as eye-opening as the rest of the presentation.  Audiences will be surprised to learn that after leaving baseball, Robinson had quite the career change.  He transitioned into the private sector, joining the coffee company Chock Full O’ Nuts.  He also became quite active in the political realm, even shocking many as a supporter of Richard Nixon.  That discussion is one of the program’s most intriguing considering Nixon’s record on civil rights.  Though, interestingly enough, it is also revealed that JFK wasn’t exactly a supporter of civil rights early on, either.  This is just a tiny portion of what makes the program’s story so enthralling.  The story of his career and impact on the field is just as in-depth as the story of his life away from the ball field.
The story of Robinson’s life off the field is in itself very enlightening.  It displays a part of Robinson’s life that is rarely if ever discussed by other documentaries.  It is just part of what makes hits program’s story so engaging.  The story of Robinson’s career and impact on the field is just as important to the story’s whole as its second half.  Most audiences know Robinson from his days as a member of the Brooklyn Dodgers.  But as audiences learn in the first half of the documentary, his time with the Dodgers wasn’t his first professional baseball experience.  He started in the Negro League before moving on to the Montreal Royals, the Dodgers’ then top AAA team.  In other words, it shows that Robinson’s time in the spotlight might have started in 1947, but his impact was being made felt long before then.  William Branch Rickey’s support of Robinson is equally powerful to note.  Viewers will be interested to learn here of the close relationship between the pair.  It was more mentor/student than owner/player.  There was a reason that Rickey only let Robinson speak his mind after had had truly established himself.  He wasn’t trying to make Robinson a “good black man.”  Rather, he was helping Robinson prove himself to the country.  Because of that, Robinson did indeed change people’s views, essentially—again—making himself Rocky decades before there was Rocky.  Both the story of Robinson’s life and career on the field and off are important in their own right to the story of Jackie Robinson.  Collectively, they show the program’s central story is key to the program’s presentation.  They are only a portion of what makes the story in whole so engaging.  The elements that were used to tell the story are just as important to note in the story’s success.

The story at the heart of Ken Burns’ new Jackie Robinson documentary in itself shows why it is a wholly engaging piece for history buffs and baseball history buffs alike.  That is because it presents not just Robinson’s career and impact on the field, but off of the field, too.  As engaging as the story is in itself, the elements that were used to help tell Robinson’s story are just as important to note as his story.  The elements in question involve vintage footage from Robinson’s playing days and his post-baseball life and photos that are just as old.  Most important to note are the interviews that are used to help illustrate Robinson’s story.  Burns interviewed a number of academics and sports writers to help make clear the importance of Robinson’s accomplishments and other things that he did both on and off the field.  He also interviewed a number of Robinson’s former teammates, his widow, and his daughter in connection with the story.  The first-hand accounts that are shared by all involved make even richer the profile of Robinson painted by the story.  They make Robinson even more of a sympathetic figure.  That is because they collectively show the odds that he faced not just from whites but eventually even other African-Americans.  That included not only his fellow ball players but fans and other members of the African-American community.  Despite people’s view of him he still stood his ground and stood for what he believed in.  Hearing those stories from those that knew him best serves to make the overall picture painted in this program all the richer and more valuable both for history buffs and baseball history buffs.  It’s just one more way in which Jackie Robinson proves itself to be one of the year’s best new sports documentaries and best new documentaries overall.  It still is not the last way in which this presentation proves itself so entertaining and engaging.  The bonus material that is included in the program is just as valuable to the program as its story and the elements that advance the story.

The story at the center of Jackie Robinson and the elements used to advance the story are both important in their own right to the whole of this documentary.  While both are equally important in keeping audiences engaged and entertained, they are not the program’s only important elements.  Now that Jackie Robinson is available on DVD and Blu-ray it also includes a small handful of bonus features.  Audiences get a glimpse into an inner city baseball team known as The Anderson Monarchs in one of those features.  The team is made up largely of African American youths.  The team members discuss the relation of the team’s name to Robinson’s own history.  One of the team’s members—Mon’e Davis—will be very familiar to many viewers.  She discusses being the only female on the team and how that related to Robinson being the only African-American on his team originally.  This is just one of the bonuses included in Jackie Robinson’s home release.  There are also some little outtakes to enjoy and the most important of the program’s bonuses, “A conversation with the filmmakers.”  This program features discussions with Ken Burns and others who worked on Jackie Robinson.  Burns and company share their thoughts on the importance of making this documentary in this feature as well as what Robinson’s accomplishments mean to them personally.  Most notable of the comments shared throughout this feature is the sentiment that Robinson’s widow and daughter had to be included in the presentation.  Every person interviewed noted that it would be wrong to not include her.  Looking back on the program audiences will find themselves agreeing with that sentiment.  She shares some of the deepest insight of anyone interviewed for the end product.  All in all the discussions that are shared in the “conversation with the filmmakers” offer just as much insight and interest to Jackie Robinson as its central story and the elements that advance and illustrate that story.  All things considered, the documentary proves in the end to be more proof of why Ken Burns is one of the leaders in his field.  They also serve to make this documentary more proof of why PBS is the last bastion of truly worthwhile programming on television today.

Ken Burns’ Jackie Robinson is one of this year’s best new sports documentaries and one of the year’s best new documentaries overall.  It shows once again why Ken Burns is one of the leading names in his field and why PBS is the last bastion of truly worthwhile programming on television.  That is because it paints a picture through its story that far outshines the biopics and other documentaries centered on his life and career.  The elements that are used to illustrate and advance the story help solidify that argument, too.  They include first-hand interviews with those closest to Robinson during his life and those that have quite a deep knowledge of him.  The bonus material that has been included in the program’s home release rounds out the program’s overall presentation.  It shows in its own way to be just as important as the program’s story and related elements.  By itself, each element proves to be hugely important to Jackie Robinson’s presentation.  Altogether they show why every history buff and sports history buff should see this most in-depth Robinson retrospective to date.  It is available now on DVD and Blu-ray and can be ordered online direct via PBS’ online store at http://www.shoppbs.org/search/index.jsp?kwCatId=&kw=jackie%20robinson&origkw=jackie+robinson&sr=1.  More on this and other titles from PBS is available online now at:

 

 

Website: http://www.pbs.org

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pbs

Twitter: http://twitter.com/PBS

 

 

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PBS To Release New Ken Burns Documentary This Spring

Courtesy:  PBS/PBS Distribution

Courtesy: PBS/PBS Distribution

This spring PBS and PBS Distribution will release a brand new documentary from acclaimed documentarian Ken Burns.

PBS and PBS Distribution will release Ken Burns’ new documentary Jackie Robinson this spring. The four-hour documentary will be released on April 15th. The timing of the double-disc set, which will be presented both on DVD and Blu-ray, is wholly intentional as it will coincide with Jackie Robinson Day. It follows the life and career of the famed baseball star and the impact that he had both on the diamond and off. That impact is highlighted through discussions from the likes of famed newsman Tom Brokaw, singers Carly Simon and Harry Belafonte, and even President Barack Obama and his wife Michelle Obama among others.

Jackie Robinson is not the first time that Burns has delved in to the baseball world having helmed his documentary Baseball in 1994. In discussing the film Burns explained that the film came from a desire to focus more closely on Robinson after having helmed that docu-series. “Jackie Robinson is the most important figure in our nation’s most important game,” he said. “He gave us our first lasting progress in civil rights since the Civil War and, ever since I finished my BASEBALL series in 1994, I’ve been eager to make a stand-alone film about the life of this courageous American. There was so much more to say not only about Robinson’s barrier-breaking moment in 1947, but about how his upbringing shaped his intolerance for any form of discrimination and how after his baseball career, he spoke out tirelessly against racial injustice, even after his star had begun to dim.”  Audiences can hear Burns discuss his new film at more length in an interview on CBS’ Face The Nation via YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KUawlPAl5vA.

Jackie Robinson was co-directed by Ken Burns, Sarah Burns, and David McMahon. It will be available on Tuesday, April 15th and will be released both on DVD and Blu-ray. The program’s double-disc DVD presentation will retail for MSRP of $24.99 and the double-disc Blu-ray presentation for $29.99. It will also be available in a number of combo packages, from which audiences can choose online and pre-order at http://www.shoppbs.org/search/index.jsp?kwCatId=&kw=ken%20burns%20jackie%20robinson&origkw=Ken+Burns%27+Jackie+Robinson&sr=1. More information on this and other titles from PBS is available online now at:

Website: http://www.pbs.org

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pbs

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

The Civil War Starts Again This Fall

Courtesy:  PBS

Courtesy: PBS

This fall, PBS’ the Civil War returns.

Ken Burns’ famed documentary mini-series The Civil War will be re-issued this fall. Originally aired on PBS in 1990, the mini-series has been re-mastered and presented in high definition on DVD and Blu-ray on Tuesday, October 13th. The upcoming release is in honor of its 25th anniversary. Its upcoming release marks the first time that it has ever been released on Blu-ray. The Blu-ray box set will retail for MSRP of $129.99 and the DVD box set for $99.99. Both presentations are spread across six discs. It will also be available for digital download.

Along with the central program, the upcoming re-issue will also feature two hours of bonus material including: “The Making Of The Civil War 25 years later,” uncut and re-mastered interviews with Shelby Foote, and much more.

More information on The Civil War is available online now at http://www.pbs.org/civilwar. It can be pre-ordered online now at:

Blu-ray: http://www.shoppbs.org/product/index.jsp?productId=69016416&cp=&sr=1&kw=the+civil+war&origkw=The+Civil+War&parentPage=search

DVD: http://www.shoppbs.org/product/index.jsp?productId=69016396&cp=&sr=1&kw=the+civil+war&origkw=The+Civil+War&parentPage=search

More information on this and other programs from PBS is available online now at:

Website: http://www.pbs.org/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pbs

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

More Than A Month More Than Just Another Documentary

Courtesy:  PBS/ITVS/National Black Programming Consortium/Sundance Institute/CPB

Courtesy: PBS/ITVS/National Black Programming Consortium/Sundance Institute/CPB

PBS has shown time and again over the course of its history why it is one of the most important networks on television with documentaries from filmmaker Ken Burns, informative programs such as Frontline and plenty of kid friendly programming on its PBS Kids affiliates.  Now with the release of More Than a Month, PBS has shown once again why it continues to be one of television’s most important networks.  More Than a Month presents to audiences the controversial discussion of whether or not America should bring an end to Black History Month.  What is most interesting about this documentary is that believe it or not, this film was written and directed by an African American.

More Than a Month opens with the now much talked about 2005 60 Minutes interview of actor Morgan Freeman by the late Mike Wallace in which Freeman openly states he felt that there should be no Black History Month.  Thus begins Shukree Hassan Tilghman’s journey in his attempt to bring an end to Black History Month.  The standard argument brought in support of ending Black History—beginning with Freeman—is that Black history is American history.  This is very true.  But in his journey to end Black History Month, Tilghman learns more about Black History, thus leading to a little bit of a change in his view.  It may even change the view of audiences, too.   Even Tilghman himself reaches the understanding that we shouldn’t end Black History Month.  Rather, we need to transcend it.  Those are his exact words.  What he means with this is that we need to reach the point at which Black history is no longer separated (or rather segregated) from American history in schools.  We need to reach the point at which what originally started as Black History Week is no longer required, but wanted to discuss.  That is one of the most interesting of the arguments raised in this entirely unbiased hour long program.

While the standard argument against Black History Month is that it is just one more form of virtual segregation, there are many other unexpected arguments raised.  However those in favor of Black History Month are just as interesting.  One of those is the point that the moment we stop making Black History Month mandatory, no one will discuss it.  We as a culture already seem to celebrate it and then sweep it under the proverbial rug.  Ironically, that is one of the arguments used in favor of abolishing Black History Month in the course of the documentary.  Tilghman interviews an African American professor who works as a social psychologist at Harvard University in his search for information.  He argues exactly what another person argues.  Only he turns it on its ear.  He notes that while it originally started as Black History Week, it became Black History Month essentially in order to appease certain parties so as to keep them quiet so that the country could go back about its ways once the month was over.  That people feel Black History Month was seemingly established as a chore of sorts is exactly what Tilghman is pointing out in the need to transcend it.  Until we can get past the point where we feel that it’s a chore to talk about Black History Month on either side, the division will not end.

Both of the arguments made in the film and noted here are valid arguments.  The arguments made on both side are among many arguments made regarding whether or not we should have Black History Month.  Also notably raised in the film is that the main purpose of Black History Month was not so much about pride as some might claim.  It was originally started as a means to establish an identity for African Americans.  That need for an identity still stands to this day, too.  It goes back to the prior discussion on whether or not it is a chore of sorts.  When it’s all said and done, the discussions raised by Mr. Tilghman and his guests throughout the course of this program will hopefully lead to a whole new openness about not just Black History Month but about the importance of a people as part of a whole society and culture.  It will hopefully bring people to the point that they see that even in the 21st Century, there is hope that we can one day rise above our differences and see each other as a whole people, rather than single parts of the whole separate from one another.  It is one more way that PBS has proven why it is still one of the most important networks on television to this day.  And whether during Black History Month or another time of the year, it is a documentary that is fitting both in the classroom and in the home for audiences of all ages.  It is available now and can be ordered online at http://www.shoppbs.org.

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

The Dust Bowl Is A Powerful History Lesson For All

Courtesy: PBS

Ken Burns’ newest documentary, The Dust Bowl is everything that audiences have come to expect from this expert film maker.  And as a companion piece to PBS’ previous release, Surviving The Dust Bowl, it’s an equally impressive piece both inside and outside the classroom.  Whether in a public school classroom, or that of a college history class, the four-hour, double disc Blu-ray set takes viewers on an in depth look at not just what led to the Dust Bowl, but also the impact across the nation of the event.  Coupled with first hand interviews from those who lived through the Dust Bowl and through recorded footage and images, a whole new generation of audiences is transported back to this tragic time, and see what makes it a time that should and never will be forgotten.The Dust Bowl wastes little time getting right to the heart of what caused this terrible event.  The stage is set with an explanation that the Dust Bowl was brought by a perfect storm of weather, over-farming, and economics.  The combined effect of these three factors would be long reaching.  As the documentary’s narrator, Peter Coyote, notes the farmers of “No Man’s Land” didn’t heed the warning bell of the Great Depression was a bad omen of what was to come.  The impact of what happened was so deep that it would lead to a change in the White House, ousting Hoover, and leading to the election of FDR.

The documentary’s second hour starts off by expanding on FDR’s time in office during the growing Dust Bowl.  Coyote tells viewers about Roosevelt’s New Deal program, and its effect on farmers.  On the surface, it would seem that FDR’s New Deal program would have been a good thing.  But as this portion of the presentation moves on, the reality is quite the opposite.  As noted by the survivors of the time, bringing cattle to the region was no help.  And even Easterners had no help or real idea of the Dust Bowl’s magnitude when the dust storms rolled to the East Coast.  Things would only continue to get worse as farms were foreclosed, businesses went bankrupt, and the strain led people of all ages to take drastic measures.  It should probably be noted here that this moment may not be suitable for younger viewers, as it might be a difficult topic to bring up.

While much of the “Dirty Thirties” was a tough time for the Southern Plains, The Dust Bowl does eventually have a happy ending.  It documents how the rains finally returned in the late 30’s, and the region finally began to experience prosperity once more.  Wheat production and prices finally rose again.  Even when the wet cycle led to another dry cycle in the 50’s, farmers in the region finally took heed to the message of conservation, helping them to get through that drought period.  Those methods, combined with irrigation methods and other procedures helped the region maintain itself.  But it’s not without another warning.  The aquifer below the southern plains is running out.  One individual notes that the Dust Bowl could easily happen again.  Even one of the survivors of the Dust Bowl comments, noting that after he’s gone, people are going to have trouble finding drinking water due to the over use of water in the region.

The material presented through this four-hour presentation is hardly the easiest to watch.  But in the grand scheme of things, it also serves as another warning that those who forget the past are doomed to repeat it.  Much of what happened over the course of the Dust Bowl was the result of weather patterns.  That’s given.  But just as much was the result of human intervention.  General lack of environmental understanding and greed played a massive role in what happened to the Southern Plains in the 1930’s.  That message is evident throughout this program.  But it isn’t preachy.  While it serves primarily as a documentation of the past, that documentation secondarily serves as a warning for this generation and the next.  That combination of purposes makes this another piece from PBS that any audience should see at least once.  It’s available now both on DVD and Blu-ray.  It can be ordered direct via PBS’ online store, http://www.shoppbs.org.

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