Greta Van Fleet’s Sophomore LP Shows Some Growth From The Band

Courtesy: Lava/Republic Records

Early this spring, up-and-coming new wave of classic rock band Greta Van Fleet released its sophomore album, The Battle at Garden’s Gate.  The band’s sophomore album, it was also the band’s major label debut, as it was released through Lava/Republic Records.  That major label support was itself a big statement about the band’s place in the rock community today.  It was a statement of support for and belief in the band.  That support was and is justified, too.  That is because this record actually presents the band as a group that really has made a valid attempt to evolve and grow away from the nonstop comparisons that it received upon the release of its debut album and EP.  ‘Age of Machine,’ the album’s lead single serves well to support the noted statement.  It will be discussed shortly.  ‘The Barbarians,’ one of the album’s later entries, is another way in which that growth and evolution is exhibited in this record.  It will be discussed a little later.  The album’s contemplative midpoint, ‘Tears of Rain’ is yet another example of the band’s growth and evolution.  It will also be discussed later.  All three songs examined here do their own part to show Greta Van Fleet’s growth on its latest album.  When they are considered along with the rest of the album’s entries, the whole makes the album a record that while maybe not perfect, still an improvement over its predecessors and gives some hope for the band’s future.

Greta Van Fleet’s recently released sophomore album, The Battle at Garden’s Gateis a strong new statement from the band.  It is a statement of growth and development from the up-and-coming new wave of classic rock act.  That is proven in part through the album’s lead single, ‘Age of Machine.’ The song is a stark stylistic contrast to the band’s existing body of work. The song’s arrangement sets a decidedly brooding atmosphere through the use of its guitars, bass, and heavy drums. Yes, front man Joshua Kiszka is still easily likened to Led Zeppelin front man Robert Plant here, but that is the closest comparison that one can make here.  The production that is used in the song gives the sound from the band in whole a certain echo effect. The guitar riffs throw back to the golden age of rock thanks to that production and their own approach. The drums and bass collectively sound so full, too, while the use of the choral vocal element adds its own touch to the song. 

The lyrical content that accompanies the song’s musical arrangement touches on a familiar topic. According to information provided about the song, its lyrics center on “the influence of technology on modern life; the role conflict plays in the global sphere; the deceptive fulfillment of tangible riches; and philosophical questions about life, love and power.”

Jake Kiszka offered an explanation on the song’s lyrical theme during a recent interview ahead of the song’s debut.

“It’s reflecting a lot of the world that we’ve seen, and I think that it’s reflecting a lot of personal truth.  What [front man] Josh  does very well with the lyrics is telling ancient tales with a contemporary application,” said Jake.

Drummer Danny Wagner built on his band mate’s comments with his own thoughts.

“We realized that while growing up, we had been shielded by many things, and we were unaware of a lot of things,” said Wagner.  “And then we were thrown out into this huge world, and it was a bit of a culture shock at first.  But as we started to travel a lot, meet new and different people and experience different cultures, our definition of ‘normal’ changed.”

Bassist Sam Kiszka also shared his thoughts on the band’s single.

“I suppose that everything has changed except what got us here in the first place,” added Sam.  “Everything – our perception of the world, perception of life itself, what it means to be an artist, what it means to be part of a beautiful, gorgeous society.  We’ve gained a larger understanding of why we’re all here.”

’Age of Machine’ is just one of the songs that serves to exhibit Greta Van Fleet’s growth in this album.  As noted, ‘The Barbarians’ is another example of that growth and development.

The familiar neo-classic rock sound and stylistic approach for which Greta Van Fleet has come to be known over such a short time is just as present here as in ‘Age of Machine’ and the other songs featured in this album.  The thing is that even with that in mind, this song still holds its own unique identity separate from the album’s other works.  There is more of a brooding, almost contemplative nature to this composition.  That is in comparison to all of the other work featured in the album.  The seeming tightness and warmth from the guitar and the definition in the drums and bass serves well to translate that feeling.  It is just one part of what makes the song stand out.  The lyrical content that accompanies the song makes for its own interest.

In the case of the lyrical content featured here, it comes across as a familiar commentary about mankind’s tendency toward conflict.  That is inferred with some clarity in the song’s lead verse and chorus, which state, “Children with their toys of war/ Birthright of death with a fiery breath/Funeral of innocence/Painted up in the red and dressed in lead/We are/Are we prisoners or renegades?/Well, I’ve done my time, woah/Behold visions of burning skies/Alas, Babylon/Woah, whoah, whoah, whoah.”  The seeming commentary is made even clearer in the song’s second, brief verse, which states, “Mothers of barbarians, woah/Were your young so spry when they left to die?/We are”  This is all just this critic’s interpretation, but it certainly seems in this case, that the song is addressing people’s tendency toward war and fighting in general.  If in fact that is the case, then it would make sense that the song’s arrangement is so brooding and contemplative in its nature.  Keeping that in mind, the whole here shows even more why the album is at least somewhat of a growth from GFV’s debut EP and album.  It is just one more example of the album’s strength.  The album’s even more contemplative midpoint, ‘Tears of Rain’ is yet another example of the continued growth in Greta Van Fleet as a unit.

‘Tears of Rain’ is a deeply moving, semi-acoustic work whose depth creates so much emotional impact for audiences.  The simple strumming on the guitar alongside the vocals here work with the piano and electric guitar line to tug at listeners’ heart strings.  To a point, one can make more of a comparison to works from The Beatles than Led Zeppelin.  The song’s musical arrangement is just one of its positives.  The lyrical content that accompanies the song’s musical arrangement makes for its own appeal.

The lyrical theme featured in ‘Tears of Rain’ comes across as yet another social commentary, despite what the song’s title infers.  In this case, the commentary comes across as addressing the state of the world.  This is inferred in the song’s lead verse and chorus as they state, “Bathing in the light around us/Praying for the night to comfort thee/Dancing on the coals below us/Praying for the flood to set us free/And the planet is still turning/And the faces are still burning/And the mother with their children/search for the rain.  That mention of the rain circles back to the song’s title.  The rest of the lead verse and chorus it seems to comment on all the negativity and how we are just wishing for things to get better and the suffering to end.  The song’s second verse tends to lean in the same direction as it states, “Drifting through the plains before us/As it turns to dust before our eyes/Pleading for a god to pour us/Just a little bit of rain from an empty sky.”  Again, here is that call for some higher power to make things better in all of the misery.  It makes the song’s moody musical arrangement make more sense, looking at all of this.  To that end, the song is just one more example of what makes The Battle at Garden’s Gate a positive new offering from Greta Van Fleet.  When this and the other songs featured in the album, the whole makes the album a record that while not perfect, still a mostly enjoyable new addition to this year’s field of new rock albums.

Greta Van Fleet’s sophomore album, Battle at Garden’s Gate is a record that is worth hearing at least once.  That is proven through its musical and lyrical content alike.  The content shows some growth from the band members themselves and as a collective.  It shows that the band cannot still be solely likened to Led Zeppeling, even despite the clear vocal similarities.  That will always be unavoidable.  Regardless, the arrangements and lyrical themes show the band is growing and changing.  When they are considered along with the rest of the album’s songs, the whole makes the album an unsuspectingly positive addition to this year’s field of new rock records.  Battle at Garden’s Gate is available now through Lava/Republic Records.  More information on the album is available along with all of the band’s latest news at:

Websitehttps://mywaysoon.com

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/gretavanfleet

Twitterhttps://twitter.com/GretaVanFleet

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Greta Van Fleet Debuts New Single, ‘Heat Above’

Courtesy: Lava/Republic Records

Greta Van Fleet debuted its latest single this week.

The band debuted its new single ‘Heat Above‘ Wednesday. The song is the third single from the band’s forthcoming album The Battle at Garden’s Gate, which is scheduled for release April 16 through Lava/Republic Records. It follows the premiere of the album’s singles ‘Age of Machine‘ and ‘My Way, Soon.’

The musical arrangement featured in ‘Heat Above’ continues to show Greta Van Fleet’s evolving growth away from its comparisons to Led Zeppelin. While front man Joshua Kizka’s vocals still closely resemble those of Robert Plant, that is the only real link to Led Zeppelin this song has. Kizka’s vocals, as a matter of fact, pair with the song’s instrumentation here to make the song overall just as comparable to works from Rush as to those from Led Zeppelin.

No explanation of the song’s lyrical theme was provided in the press release distributed Wednesday about the song’s debut. That aside, the lyrical content that accompanies the song’s musical arrangement is sure to connect with listeners in its own right.

In other news, the track listing for The Battle at Garden’s Gate was revealed Wednesday. The listing is noted below.

Complete track-listing:

1.  Heat Above

2.  My Way, Soon

3.  Broken Bells

4.  Built by Nations

5.  Age of Machine

6.  Tears of Rain

7.  Stardust Chords

8.  Light My Love

9.  Caravel

10. The Barbarians

11. Trip the Light Fantastic

12. The Weight of Dreams

More information on Greta Van Fleet’s new single is available along with all of the band’s latest news at:

Websitehttps://mywaysoon.com

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/gretavanfleet

Twitterhttps://twitter.com/GretaVanFleet

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Greta Van Fleet Debuts ‘Age of Machine’ Video

Courtesy: Lava/Republic Records

Greta Van Fleet debuted the video for its latest single this week.

The band debuted the video for its single ‘Age of Machine’ Thursday. The video’s debut comes less than a week after the band debuted the song by itself.

The song, the title track from the band’s forthcoming album, is the record’s second single. The band premiered the album’s lead single ‘My Way, Soon‘ more than two months ago. The album is scheduled for release April 16 through Lava/Republic Records.

The ‘Age of Machines’ video — co-directed by Matthew Daniel Siskin and the band — features a variety of visuals, including a spinning camera in a tunnel that produces a dizzying effect, the band’s members destroying a statue, and oil derricks. There is also footage of the band members riding motorcycles through the noted tunnel.

According to information provided about the new video, the visuals are meant to help translate the message in the song’s lyrical content, which centers on “the influence of technology on modern life; the role conflict plays in the global sphere; the deceptive fulfillment of tangible riches; and philosophical questions about life, love and power.”

The noted information states that the video’s imagery “leaves the final significance to the viewer – whether that narrative be focused on climate, industrialism, intimacy, self confidence, tradition, humanity itself, or otherwise.”

Front man Joshua Kiszka addressed the song’s lyrical content, albeit indirectly, during a recent interview.

“There was a lot of self-evolution happening during the writing of this album that was prompted by experiences I had, experiences we all had, so a lot of contemplation occurred,” he said.

Kaje Jiszka expanded on Josh’s comments.

“It’s reflecting a lot of the world that we’ve seen, and I think that it’s reflecting a lot of personal truth.  What Josh does very well with the lyrics is telling ancient tales with a contemporary application,” said Jake.

Drummer Danny Wagner built on his band mates’ comments with his own thoughts, discussing not just the band’s new single, but the group’s forthcoming album, too.

“We realized that while growing up, we had been shielded by many things, and we were unaware of a lot of things,” said Wagner.  “And then we were thrown out into this huge world, and it was a bit of a culture shock at first.  But as we started to travel a lot, meet new and different people and experience different cultures, our definition of ‘normal’ changed.”

Bassist Sam Kiszka also shared his thoughts on the band’s new material.

“I suppose that everything has changed except what got us here in the first place,” added Sam.  “Everything – our perception of the world, perception of life itself, what it means to be an artist, what it means to be part of a beautiful, gorgeous society.  We’ve gained a larger understanding of why we’re all here.”

The musical arrangement featured in GVF’s new single sets a decidedly brooding atmosphere through the use of its guitars, bass, and heavy drums. Yes, front man Joshua Kiszka is still easily likened to Led Zeppelin front man Robert Plant here, but that is the closest comparison that one can make. The single is a stark stylistic contrast to the band’s existing body of work by comparison.

The production that is used in the song’s musical arrangement gives the sound from the band in whole a certain echo effect. The guitar riffs throw back to the golden age of rock thanks to that production and their own approach. The drums and bass collectively sound so full, too, while the use of the choral vocal element adds its own touch to the song.

Greg Kurstin (Adele, Foo Fighters, Paul McCartney) produced The Battle at Garden’s Gate.

More information on Greta Van Fleet’s new single and video is available along with all of the band’s latest news at:

Websitehttp://mywaysoon.com

Facebookhttp://www.facebook.com/gretavanfleet

Twitterhttp://twitter.com/GretaVanFleet

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Greta Van Fleet To Perform Live Tonight

Courtesy: Lava/Republic Records

Greta Van Fleet is scheduled to be on television tonight.

The band is scheduled to perform its new single ‘My Way, Soon’ on The Late Show With Stephen Colbert. The song is the lead single from the band’s forthcoming album The Battle at Garden’s Gate, which is scheduled for release April 16 through Lava/Republic Records.

In anticipation of the album’s pending release, the band debuted its second single, ‘Age Of Machines‘ Dec. 3. The single’s premiere last week came less than two months after the band debuted the album’s lead single ‘My Way, Soon’ and its companion video.

The ‘My Way, Soon’ video’s production is most of note in that its production is meant to make the presentation look like something right from the 1960s and 70s, as if it was shot on an 8mm camera. The effect plays into the continued neo-classic sound that has defined the band since its rise to fame more than three years ago.

Speaking of musical content, the song’s musical arrangement helps the band expand away from the Led Zeppelin comparisons that audiences made early on. While the comparisons between front man Joshua Kiszka and Led Zeppelin front man Robert Plant are unavoidable, the song’s overall sound is less comparable. The song’s arrangement is grounded in the pairing of its guitar and bass line, whose juxtaposition makes for its own memorable impact. The production even gives the drums a fuller, richer vintage sound than the tight, spit shined sound of so much modern music.

The result of the noted elements is that the song’s arrangement boasts its own unique neo-classic rock sound while also exhibiting the band’s growth as a unit.

The lyrical content featured in ‘My Way Soon’ came from a personal point, according to Kiszka.

“This song was inspired by what three years of touring did by opening so many doorways,” he said. “ This is my truth, how I feel about all of our travels, but I know it echoes the experiences and changes of perspectives for Jake, Sam, and Danny as well.”

Greg Kurstin (Adele, Foo Fighters, Paul McCartney) produced The Battle at Garden’s Gate.

More information on Greta Van Fleet’s new singles and videos is available along with all of the band’s latest news at:

Websitehttp://mywaysoon.com

Facebookhttp://www.facebook.com/gretavanfleet

Twitterhttp://twitter.com/GretaVanFleet

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Greta Van Fleet Announces New LP Title, Release Date; Debuts Album’s Second Single

Courtesy: Lava/Republic Records

Greta Van Fleet’s next album will come in the new year.

The band announced it will release its new album The Battle at Garden’s Gate on April 16 through Lava/Republic Records. Pre-orders are open.

In anticipation of the album’s pending release, the band debuted its second single, ‘Age Of Machines‘ Thursday. The single’s premiere comes less than two months after the band debuted the album’s lead single ‘My Way, Soon’ and its companion video.

While ‘My Way, Soon’ continues the lend itself to comparison to Led Zeppelin, GVF’s latest single is a stark stylistic contrast to its existing body of work. The song’s arrangement sets a decidedly brooding atmosphere through the use of its guitars, bass, and heavy drums. Yes, front man Joshua Kiszka is still easily likened to Led Zeppelin front man Robert Plant here, but that is the closes comparison that one can make.

The production that is used in the song gives the sound from the band in whole a certain echo effect. The guitar riffs throw back to the golden age of rock thanks to that production and their own approach. The drums and bass collectively sound so full, too, while the use of the choral vocal element adds its own touch to the song.

The lyrical content that accompanies the song’s musical arrangement touches on a familiar topic. According to information provided about the song, its lyrics center on “the influence of technology on modern life; the role conflict plays in the global sphere; the deceptive fulfillment of tangible riches; and philosophical questions about life, love and power.”

Kiszka addressed the song’s lyrical content, albeit indirectly, during a recent interview.

“There was a lot of self-evolution happening during the writing of this album that was prompted by experiences I had, experiences we all had, so a lot of contemplation occurred,” he said.

Kaje Jiszka expanded on Josh’s comments.

“It’s reflecting a lot of the world that we’ve seen, and I think that it’s reflecting a lot of personal truth.  What Josh does very well with the lyrics is telling ancient tales with a contemporary application,” said Jake.

Drummer Danny Wagner built on his band mates’ comments with his own thoughts, discussing not just the band’s new single, but the group’s forthcoming album, too.

“We realized that while growing up, we had been shielded by many things, and we were unaware of a lot of things,” said Wagner.  “And then we were thrown out into this huge world, and it was a bit of a culture shock at first.  But as we started to travel a lot, meet new and different people and experience different cultures, our definition of ‘normal’ changed.”

Bassist Sam Kiszka also shared his thoughts on the band’s new material.

“I suppose that everything has changed except what got us here in the first place,” added Sam.  “Everything – our perception of the world, perception of life itself, what it means to be an artist, what it means to be part of a beautiful, gorgeous society.  We’ve gained a larger understanding of why we’re all here.”

Greg Kurstin (Adele, Foo Fighters, Paul McCartney) produced The Battle at Garden’s Gate.

More information on Greta Van Fleet’s new single and video is available along with all of the band’s latest news at:

Websitehttp://mywaysoon.com

Facebookhttp://www.facebook.com/gretavanfleet

Twitterhttp://twitter.com/GretaVanFleet

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

South Of Eden Announces Details For EP Release Show

Courtesy: TAG Publicity

South of Eden will celebrate the release of its new EP this weekend.

The band will hold a live streaming performance of its new EP The Talk at 8 p.m. Friday night.  The concert, which will come live from Flannagan’s in Columbus, OH, will stream through South of Eden’s official YouTube channel and Facebook page.  Jerry Harvey Audio and Music Health Alliance are supporting the event.

The Talk is South Of Eden’s first recording under its current moniker and its major label debut, having been released Aug. 21 through Lava/Republic Records.  The EP is available to stream and download here.  The band released its debut album Take One in 2018 through its former name Black Coffee.

More information on South of Eden’s new EP is available along with all of the band’s latest news and more at:

 

Websitehttp://southofedenband.com

Facebookhttp://www.facebook.com/southofedenmusic

Twitterhttp://twitter.com/southofedenband

 

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

South Of Eden’s Second Studio Recording Could Be The Band’s Breakout Record

Courtesy: Lava/Republic Records

Neo-classic rock band South of Eden  (formerly Black Coffee) will release its first major label studio recording Friday.  The band is scheduled to release its new four-song EP The Talk through Lava/Republic Records.  The 16-minute record is the band’s first new music since it released its 2018 album Take One under its former moniker.  That nine-song album was the band’s debut (and only) album under the name, but was an impressive offering from the group.  Now two years later the band has found success yet again with its debut EP.  That success is thanks to the record’s musical and lyrical content together, as is evidenced right from the EP’s outset in its title track.  It will be addressed shortly.  ‘Morning Brew’ is another way in which the EP shows its strength.  It will be addressed a little later.  The EP’s closer, which is also its lead singles, is one more example of how this record’s musical and lyrical content comes together to make it such an impressive new effort from the band.  When it is considered with the other two songs noted here and the EP’s one other song, ‘Solo,’ the whole of the EP becomes a work that will definitely leave listeners talking about South of Eden.

South of Eden’s sophomore studio recording and debut EP The Talk is a successful new offering from the up-and-coming neo-classic rock band.  It is a work that will appeal to rock and roll purists and rock fans in general.  That is thanks to the record’s combined musical and lyrical content.  The EP’s opener/title track is just one of the songs that serves to support the noted statements.  The song’s musical arrangement wastes no time grabbing listeners in its opening bars with its up-tempo riff.  That riff gives way to a more reserved nature in the song’s lead verse.  That reserved approach gives way to the noted high energy chorus.  The back and forth of that reserved and more up-tempo sounds ensures listeners’ engagement and entertainment from beginning to end of the nearly four-minute song.  What is really interesting to note here is that the classic rock influences of AC/DC and Guns N’ Roses, it also lends itself to comparisons to works from Buckcherry and Alter Bridge.  In other words, the classic rock influences are infused alongside the modern guitar rock influences.  The end result is an arrangement that is a strong start for the album and just one example of why the EP’s musical content is so strong.  The lyrical accompaniment to that musical content adds to the song’s appeal.

Not having a lyrics sheet to reference, the song’s lyrical content is difficult to decipher.  However, from what can be deciphered sans said sheet, it can be inferred (hopefully correctly) that this song is a commentary of sorts about how people say one thing but do something opposite; those people who feed lies to themselves and others.  This is supposed as front man Ehab Omran sings in the song’s chorus about someone who is seemingly rejecting the help that others offer.  He goes so far as to sing in the chorus, “You say you’re trying/But who can tell/When you talk, talk, talk?”  There is even mention in the song’s second verse of “helpful hands/reaching in/everyone tries/But you don’t give in” before he asks again, “What do you want?”  The song’s lead verse adds to the discussion as it addresses someone who in a different situation who doesn’t seem to know what he or she wants.  Again, this interpretation is made wholly sans lyrics to reference.  Hopefully it is somewhere in the proverbial ballpark.  Right or wrong, it can at least be agreed that there is a certain commentary going on here.  That in itself is sure to engage listeners while the song’s musical arrangement will entertain them.  To that end, it makes for a strong start for the EP.  It is just one of the songs that shows the EP’s strength.  ‘Morning Brew,’ the EP’s third song is one more example of why audiences will enjoy the record.

‘Morning Brew’ is much more reserved in comparison to ‘The Talk’ and to the EP’s other two songs in terms of its musical arrangement.  This arrangement is a bluesy, subdued composition that lends itself to comparisons works from the likes of maybe Johnny Lang with its slick guitar riffs.  That reserved nature in this almost blues ballad type composition serves to help translate the emotion in the song’s lyrical theme.

The lyrical content at the center of ‘Morning Brew’ comes across as an introspective statement.  It seems to come from the mind of someone who is going through a difficult time, emotionally speaking.  This is inferred as Omran sings in the song’s lead verse, “Where do you go/When your days are numbered/You’re feeling lonely/Down by the seashore/When your days are bright/Lights are heavy/Where would you go/If I can’t see straight/And my feet stay steady/Walk out the door/All we do/Our world is not ready/Ain’t that the way it goes/When you’re all alone.”  He continues in the song’s second verse, “What would they say/If they tell you no/But you do it anyway/Life’s all a big game/Where the people lose/When the evil stands to gain/Looking down the aisle of a train/People’s eyes/All I see is pain/newspapers and crosswords say we’re all lookin’ down the barrel of a gun.” Again, there is a lot of contemplation here about one’s own situation and the world.   When this deep thought is coupled with the song’s so subtle that it’s heavy arrangement, the result is a deeply moving work that stands strong on its own merits.  It is just one more example of what makes the EP stand out.  The EPs closer and lead single ‘Dancing With Fire’ is yet another key addition to the record.

The musical arrangement at the heart of ‘Dancing With Fire’ is as fiery as the title implies.  Drummer Tommy McCullough and guitarist Justin Young lead the way this time out.  Omran and bassist Nick Frantianne add their own touch to the arrangement, fleshing it out even more and making it just as strong a finale for the EP as its opener was a start.  Fans of bands, such as Motley Crue, Guns N’ Roses, and Poison will appreciate this arrangement.  It’s just one part of what makes this song shine.  The song’s lyrical content adds to its impact.

This is probably the easiest song to understand of the EP’s four tracks in terms of its lyrical content.  It clearly focuses on a person who is head over heels in love with another person.  This is made relatively clear early on as Omran sings in the song’s lead verse, “Well you’re pushin’ left/Pullin’ right/I can’t feel my hands tonight/Now, baby/yeah, you tell me when/tell me who/Stuck between a hard place and you/Sweet lady/You’ve been talking for so long/Putting up so strong/Forget about it/Got me feeling so wrong/Trapped in wire/’Cause I’ve been dancing with fire/Those flames keep burning up brighter/You’re walking past desire/But I can’t keep from loving you.”  This is pretty clear in its message.  This is someone who is crazy for that other person.  Any doubt is eliminated in the song’s second verse, which finds Omran singing, “Here we go/Go again/Ultimatums that never end/I’m hazy/With your smiling lips and your whispering tongue/Getting by/Saying you’re so young and lazy.”  Again, here audiences get someone whose mind is obsessed with that other person.  This readily accessible lyrical theme couples with the song’s equally accessible musical arrangement to make the song in whole the EP’s best song.  When it is considered with the other two songs noted here and the EP’s one remaining song, ‘Solo,’ the whole of the EP becomes a work that rock and roll purists everywhere will appreciate and a record that deserves its own consideration for a spot on any critic’s list of the year’s top new EPs.

South of Eden’s second studio recording and debut EP The Talk is a positive new offering from the neo-classic rock band that purists of the genre will certainly appreciate.  That is due to its musical arrangements and lyrical content alike.  All three of the songs discussed here support that statement.  The EP’s one remaining song not addressed here supports that statement, too.  All things considered, the EP’s content overall makes it a record that will leave audiences talking.  Yes, that awful pun was intended.  It is scheduled for release Friday through Lava/Republic Records.

More information on South of Eden’s new EP is available along with all of the band’s latest news and more at:

 

Websitehttp://southofedenband.com

Facebookhttp://www.facebook.com/southofedenmusic

Twitterhttp://twitter.com/southofedenband

 

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.