Udo Dirkschneider’s New Covers Collection Is A Rare Set Worth Hearing

Courtesy: Atomic Fire Records

Udo Dirkschneider is among the most well-known and respected front man in the rock and hard rock communities. That is due to his work with Accept and with his namesake band, U.D.O. Considering everything that Dirkschneider has done over the course of his career — between records recorded with each band and even compilations of the bands’ hits — there is still one item that to this point, Dirkschneider has not checked off from his list. That item is a covers collection. This Friday, he will get to check off that item when he releases his first-ever covers collection, My Way. Running 17 songs deep, the compilation is a unique collection of songs, pulling in takes of hit songs from the likes of Rainbow, Judas Priest, Motorhead, Led Zeppelin, Billy Squier, and even Tina Turner. They and their songs are just some of the notable entries in this presentation. The Led Zeppelin, Billy Squier and Motorhead covers stay largely true to their source material while amping them up slightly. The Tina Turner cover is unique in its own right, building on the original and making it even more interesting. Among the more notable covers featured in the collection is that of The Rolling Stones’ timeless classic, ‘Paint It Black.’ This cover will be discussed shortly. The cover of AC/DC’s ‘T.N.T’ is near perfection. It will be discussed a little later. Any review of Dirkshchneider’s new record would be incomplete without a discussion on the cover of ‘My Way,’ the collection’s title track. It will also be discussed later. All three songs noted here are important in their own way to the whole of My Way. When they are considered with all of the record’s other covers, the whole makes My Way a presentation that rock and hard rock fans will find just as appealing as those of Dirkschneider.

My Way, the first-ever covers collection from veteran hard rock front man Udo Dirkschneider, is quite the unique presentation. It is a work that his fans and casual hard rock and rock fans alike will find appealing. That is proven throughout the record in each and every tribute that Dirkschneider and his fellow musicians pay here. Sadly those fellow musicians are not credited in the streaming copy of the record provided to this critic. If names were provided, those musicians would get their due credit. Getting back on the topic at hand, the record offers audiences plenty of notable songs from acts that are themselves equally notable (and some less notable, making for even more engagement and entertainment). One of the most notable of the covers is that of The Rolling Stones’ ‘Paint It Black.’ The song is known to every rock fan out there. That opening guitar line from Keith Richards and the companion drumming from the late great Charlie Watts are iconic to say the least. Front man Mick Jagger’s slightly gritty vocals add even more to the whole. Where the original song gives audiences an upbeat albeit contemplative work, Dirkschneider and his fellow musicians on the other hand turn the original on its ear by giving it a power metal facelift of sorts. Dirkschneider’s familiar gritty near growling vocal delivery adds its own unique punch to the composition alongside the power metal style and sound presented here. It gives the song a whole new sense that still hits hard in its own fashion while still keeping as true as possible to the source material. It is a take that is sure to impress The Rolling Stones, their fans, and those of Dirkschneider alike. It is just one of the song featured in this set that makes the collection worth hearing. Dirkschneider and company’s take of AC/DC’s ‘T.N.T.’ is another notable addition to the record.

As with the band’s cover of ‘Paint It Black,’ Dirkschneider and company strive to stay true to the source material in its cover of ‘T.N.T.’ while still giving the original song a welcome amped up new treatment. Instead of a power metal approach in this case, the collective instead just gives the song a rich, bluesy almost late 80s hair metal approach (right down to the bombastic guitar solo at the songs’ end) and blends that with the song’s original edge. What’s really interesting here is that Dirkschneider’s trademark vocal delivery style is actually an interesting blend of the vocals of AC/DC’s original front man Bon Scott and his replacement, Brian Johnson. That blend of sounds and styles within his one delivery makes his vocals all the more important to the whole. In turn, it makes the song that much more enjoyable and in turn, the album, too.

As much as the covers of AC/DC’s ‘T.N.T.’ and The Rolling Stones’ ‘Paint It Black’ do to make My Way worth hearing, they are just two of the record’s most notable tracks. No examination of the record would be complete without an examination of the collection’s title track. Originally composed by the team of Jacques Revaux, Gilles Thibaut, and Claude Francois, it was made most popular by American singer Frank Sinatra in 1969 after Paul Anka secured the rights for the song from the group. Ironically it is well-known that Sinatra hated the song the more popular it became because he got tired of having to hear and perform the song. That aside, it still remains a fan favorite to this day among thousands of audiences, apparently including Dirkschneider. One would not think Dirkschneider, a metal head, would find inspiration in Sinatra, but apparently he has some respect for the famed singer and what is one of his most beloved songs. Dirkschneider actually does a surprisingly impressive job here, his more familiar gritty vocal delivery gone in favor of a much more controlled approach and sound. The control that he uses here along with the use of the piano, strings, and subtle time keeping throws directly back to the composition that made Sinatra such a star. Even as the song builds to its peaks in its choruses, Dirkschneider and his fellow musicians exercise so much control, making the song stand out so starkly from all of the other covers featured throughout the record. It honestly serves to create a whole new respect for Dirkschneider in the end because it shows that he is more than just the metal head that so many people think they know. It makes the song a wonderful final accent to this record. When it is considered alongside the other songs examined here and with the rest of the record’s entries, the whole makes the overall presentation a rare covers set that is actually worth hearing if only every occasionally.

My Way, the first ever collection of covers from Udo Dikschneider, is an interesting compilation. It brings together a relatively wide swath of rock and hard rock songs, as well as some more pop oriented content for a while that makes a person rethink what they think they know of the famed former Accept and current U.D.O. front man and his tastes in music. The covers themselves vary in style and sound but still strive to stay as true as possible to their source material. That is made clear through the songs examined here. When those songs are considered along with the rest of the record’s entries, the whole makes My Way a rare covers collection that is actually worth hearing.

My Way is scheduled for release Friday through Atomic Fire Records. More information on the collection is available along with all of Dirkschneider’s latest news at:

Websitehttps://www.udo-online.com

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/udoonline

Twitterhttps://twitter.com/udoonline

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Angeles’ Latest LP Will Appeal To A Very Targeted Audience

Courtesy: Courtesy: Dark Star Records/Sony/Universal

Veteran rock band Angeles returned this week with its latest album, Running Like An Outlaw.  Independently released Friday, the record is the band’s 14th and came less then two years after the release of the band’s then latest album, Hell on High Heels.  The eight-song record will appeal primarily to the band’s established audiences, as has already been proven by the album’s current singles, ‘Nothing But Love’ and ‘Witch Hunter.’  Each song will be discussed here.  When they are considered along with the likes of ‘She’s On Fire,’ the album’s closer, and with the rest of the album’s entries, the whole makes Running Like An Outlaw a record that Angeles’ most devoted audiences will find engaging and entertaining.

Running Like An Outlaw, the latest album from veteran rock band Angeles is a presentation that will find appeal among a very targeted audience.  That is evidenced through the album’s musical and lyrical content.  The record’s lead single, ‘Witch Hunter,’ is just one of the songs that serves to support the noted statement.  The musical arrangement featured in ‘Witch Hunter’ is a mostly driving composition. The combination of the vocals alongside bassist Cal Shelton’s performance, Dale Lytle’s work on guitar, and the time keeping gives the song a sound and stylistic approach that will appeal to any classic rock fan. The whole shows an interesting mix of influence from the likes of Judas Priest, Motley Crue, and Ozzy Osbourne. Yes, it sounds like quite the eccentric mix, but it works here.

No information was provided about the song’s lyrics. In listening to the song, listeners are left to infer that this song’s lyrics center on…well…a witch hunter. That would match up with lyrics of so much music from that era.

‘Nothing But Love’ shows how Angeles’ new album also through its musical arrangement.  The arrangement in this case is another upbeat, guitar-driven composition.  The combination of the vocals and the distinct vintage guitar rock approach and sound will take audiences back to that eera of big hair and even bigger riffs.  Influences from the likes of Motley Crue and Poison are evident throughout the four minute-plus composition. 

The lyrical content featured alongside the song’s musical arrangement is just as familiar as the musical content.  It focuses on the all too familiar topic of a broken relationship.  New front man Mason Oliver (who replaced Louis Collins) last year, makes that clear when he sings here about seeing that love interest everywhere he goes. He sings, “There’s nothing but love for you/No matter where I go…I still see you.”  Again, the theme here is clear. Whether intended or not, Oliver also makes references to songs from Metallica, and Marvin Gaye & Tammi Terrell in the lyrical content.  That makes for its own interest.  All these considered, the song’s lyrical and musical content collectively just one more example of what makes this album appealing for the band’s noted audiences.  ‘She’s On Fire,’ the album’s finale, is yet one more way in which the noted statement is supported.

‘She’s On Fire’ stands out musically because while the vintage rock sound is just as present as in any of the album’s other songs, the overall arrangement takes the band more in a Led Zeppelin direction.  Even the vocal delivery here is comparable to that of Robert Plant while the guitar riff sounds so much like that of Led Zeppelin’s ‘Black Dog Mountain’ at points.  Even the drums sound so rich, thanks to the production that went into the song.  The whole of the arrangement makes the song appealing in its own right.  The energy in the arrangement works well with the song’s lyrical content, which once again focuses on a woman.

In the case of this song, the woman in question is one over which the song’s subject is head over heels.  This is made clear as Oliver sings, “Hey, girl/I see the fire in your eyes/Hey, girl/So many times, you tried to hide.”  He goes on later to sing, “She’s on fire” amid everything else.  Again, the whole is a man declaring how crazy he is for said woman.  It’s another classic rock standard that is certain to appeal to the noted audiences and to fans of classic rock in general.  When the song in whole is considered along with the others examined here and with the album’s other songs, the whole of that content ensures that Angeles’ established audiences and casual vintage rock fans alike will enjoy this record.

Angeles’ new album, Running Like An Outlaw, is a presentation that will appeal to avert distinct range of listeners.  That is due to its combined musical and lyrical content (and its production).  The band’s established audiences will find the record appealing just as much as casual classic rock fans because of said content and production.  The songs examined here make that clear.  When they are considered along with the rest of the album’s entries, the whole makes the overall album worth hearing at least once.

Running Like An Outlaw is available now through Dark Star Records/Sony/Universal. More information on Angeles’ new album is available online along with all of the band’s latest news at:

Websitehttps://www.angelesband.com

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/TheAngelesBand

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and ‘Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Musical Arrangements, Their Sequencing Save Robert Plant And Alison Krauss’ New Album

Courtesy: Rhino Records

Led Zeppelin front man Robert Plant and country music songstress Alison Krauss returned this month with their second new release in the form of Raise The Roof.  The 12-song, standard edition (Target offers the record in a deluxe edition that features two bonus tracks, bringing the total to 14) is the duo’s first new record in 14 years, and will receive support with a tour planned to launch in the new year.  The 53-minute record is, at least in the ears and mind of this critic, a mixed bag that maybe was not entirely worth the exceptionally long wait.  That is not to say that the album is a failure, but it could have been better at the same time.  The record’s main positive (and negative) is its sequencing.  This will be discussed shortly.  A much clearer negative is the issue of record’s lyrical content.  This will be discussed a little later.  Another semi-positive comes in the record’s musical content.  This will also be discussed later.  Each item noted here is important in its own way to the whole of Raise The Roof.  All things considered, they make the album one of the lesser of this year’s new albums that, again, simply proved to not be worth the wait.

Robert Plant and Alison Krauss’ recently released album, Raise The Roof is a record that sadly will not have everyone wanting to raise the roof.  It is not a failure, but it is also not a complete success.  This is proven through the duality in the album’s sequencing.  The sequencing is both positive and negative because it starts off weakly with its brooding opener, ‘Quattro (World Drifts In).’  Honestly, things do not really even start to pick up until the record reaches its fourth song, ‘Trouble With My Lover.’  The song’s arrangement immediately conjures thoughts of Peggy Lee’s rendition of Little Willie John’s classic song, ‘Fever.’  From there, things do finally pick up and remain relatively stable at least until the record’s end.  So again, the negative of the sequencing is thankfully only temporary.  To that end, it is not enough to be too problematic, but is still unavoidable in talking about the record’s shortcomings even with its more positive side in mind.  While the sequencing is mostly a positive, the record’s lyrical content proves negative, but again not to the point that it makes the record a failure.

The lyrical content featured in Raise The Roof is so problematic because it is mostly the same thing from one song to the next – love gained and lost.  Throughout the record, those overarching themes are so prominent.  Even early on, audiences get the theme in the form of the album’s second song, ‘The Price of Love.’  This is one of the many songs in this record that focuses on lost love.  It opens with Krauss singing, “Wine is sweet and gin is bitter/Drink while you can/You won’t forget her/You talk too much/You laugh too loud/That’s the price of love/The debt you pay with tears and pain/The price of love/It costs you more when you’re to blame.”  Plant joins in with Kraus in the song’s chorus.  The whole statement here is, as noted, one of those oh woe is me songs about love lost.  The mood that these lyrics set alongside the song’s musical arrangement is melancholy to say the least.  Some will appreciate that mood and the wording in the lyrics, but others will likely be far less receptive, even if they are going through so much of what is in this song.  It really does make the song problematic in its own right.  Add in that, again, love gained and lost is pretty much all that the songs’ lyrical content presents, and the problems only continue from here.

‘Going Where The Lonely Go’ continues to show the problem with the record’s lyrical content.  Herein is yet another song that is just about love lost.  That is made clear as Krauss sings in the song’s lead and second verse against the decidedly melancholy honky tonk style musical arrangement, “Rolling with the flow/Going where the lonely go/Anywhere the lights are low/Going where the lonely go/Making up things to do/Not running in all directions/Trying to find you/I’m just rolling with the flow/Going where the lonely go.”  Now herein lies even more problem, not just with the lyrics, but with the music, too.  The lyrics present the song’s subject as someone who is over that significant other.  This is someone who is moving on, yet the song’s musical arrangement is so sad and melancholy.  It really does not match.  Meanwhile the lyrical theme is again that of a relationship that has met its end.  It is anything but unique, but rather more of the same from Kraus and Plant in this record.  It further detracts from the engagement and entertainment.

‘Can’t Let Go’ is yet another example of audiences getting more of the same, lyrically from this album.  Herein is yet another song whose lyrical content is melancholy as it focuses on a broken relationship.  This is made clear as Kraus sings, “Told you, baby/One more time/Don’t make me sit all alone and cry/Well, it’s over/I know it/But I can’t let go/I’m like a fish out of water/And a cat in a tree/You don’t even want to talk to me/Well, it’s over/And I know it/But I can’t let go.”  The song’s second verse is similar with the mention of the candle “burning bright” and the subject feeling like he/she has “been shot.”  What is so interesting is that in this case, the song’s musical arrangement is in direct contrast what with its energy.  In the same breath, that energy helps to translate the sense of denial that the song’s subject feels in this case.  To that end, the song works.  Yet at the same time, the song’s lyrical content is still so much in the same vein as the other songs examined here and the rest of the album’s entries.  Keeping that in mind, that audiences get the same kind of lyrical content from one song to the next, it detracts noticeably from the record’s presentation.  It is not enough to make the album a failure, but it still certainly does take away from the album’s engagement and entertainment.

While the lyrical content featured in this record detracts noticeably from the album’s presentation, its musical counterpart makes up for that issue at least to a point.  As noted in an examination of the songs here, that is made clear.  The musical arrangements do well in their own right to help translate the emotion in each song’s lyrical approach.  What’s more, the arrangements are unique of one another, too.  The record opens with a light, piano-driven neo-folk piece that echoes influences of songs from Fleetwood Mac, what with the harmonies and subtle vocals.  ‘The Price of Love,’ which immediately follows, is something of a neo-folk rock composition.  Meanwhile, ‘Go Your Way’ bears a sort of country music approach.  Plant’s vocal delivery here in its style and sound actually works surprisingly well.  As the album progresses into ‘Trouble With My Lover,’ listeners get more of a bluesy style composition before things change again in its immediate follow-up, ‘Searching For My Love.’  In this case, audiences get a light, pop/country/rock style composition a la the Eagles.  From there on through to the album’s end, the arrangements continue to change, ensuring together with the noted arrangements, listeners’ engagement and entertainment.  Looking at the record’s bigger picture, it is really this item and the sequencing of the arrangements that really keeps things just interesting enough for audiences.  Keeping that in mind, those two elements prove to be the album’s saving graces.  That is even with the problems that the sequencing poses in mind along with the problems of the record’s lyrical content.  Overall, the sequencing and the musical arrangements do just enough to make Raise The Roof a work that won’t leave audiences raising the roof, but will ensure the album is worth hearing at least once.

Robert Plant and Alison Krauss’ new album, Raise The Roof is not a record that will make audiences want to raise the roof.  At the same time though, audiences will agree that it is worth hearing at least once.  That is thanks in part to the sequencing.  While the sequencing causes the record to start off slow, it thankfully does pick things up not too long after the fact, and keeps them moving from then on.  It also ensures that the album’s featured musical arrangements keep changing and in turn keep listeners engaged and entertained.  These elements do just enough to make up for the shortcoming that is the record’s lyrical content.  The record’s lyrical content is problematic because it lacks any real originality.  Every single song focuses on either love gained or lost.  There is no fun lyrical content, nor anything serious.  It is all just that overarching theme of relationships, which really does become boring rather quickly.  Even with that in mind, it is not enough to doom the album, but rather keep it from becoming one of the year’s top new albums.

Raise The Roof is available now through Rhino Records.  More information on the record is available along with all of Robert Plant’s latest news at:

Website: https://robertplant.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/robertplant

Twitter: https://twitter.com/RObertPlant

More information on Raise The Roof is available along with all of Alison Krauss’ latest news at:

Website: https://alisonkrauss.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/OfficialAlisonKrauss

Twitter: https://twitter.com/AlisonKraus

To keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.  

Mark C. Daniel Debuts New Single, ‘Sign Za Life’

Courtesy: CowgirlZen Entertainment

Independent singer-songwriter-musician Mark C. Daniel kicked off the weekend by debuting his latest single.

Daniel debuted his new single, ‘Sign Za Life‘ (pronounced like ‘Signs of Life’) Friday. The song features an up-tempo percussion-driven arrangement. The steady time keeping and drums’ rich sound pairs with the guitar line, vocals, and bass to give the song a vintage rock and roll style and sound a la Jerry Lee Lewis. At the same time, there is also a sort of modern rock touch that exhibits influence of bands, such as The Black Crowes and Led Zeppelin.

The Led Zeppelin comparison is not accidental, either, as Daniel noted in comments about the song’s arrangement.

“This was the last song we recorded in this session and the first take of it,” said Daniel. “Mickey Curry – Drums(the Cult, Bryan Adams, Alice Cooper) felt like adding a few John Bonham-‘esque punches in the Verses. It created an interesting dynamic and added a “Zeppelin Feel.” We are all huge classic rock fans so it felt great. I let the electric energy of the live room take over which is interesting in that I actually wrote this song on an acoustic as a slow-burning Blues song. It felt like we were going to go off the rails a few times but that’s exactly what gives the song its honesty and true to form edgy feel.”

No information was provided about the song’s lyrical theme in the press release announcing the song’s premiere. Listening to the song, the lyrics come across as a sort of social commentary. That is of course just this critic’s interpretation.

More information on Mark C. Daniel’s new single is available along with all of his latest news at:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/markcdanielofficial

Twitter: https://twitter.com/markdanielmusic

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Greta Van Fleet’s Sophomore LP Shows Some Growth From The Band

Courtesy: Lava/Republic Records

Early this spring, up-and-coming new wave of classic rock band Greta Van Fleet released its sophomore album, The Battle at Garden’s Gate.  The band’s sophomore album, it was also the band’s major label debut, as it was released through Lava/Republic Records.  That major label support was itself a big statement about the band’s place in the rock community today.  It was a statement of support for and belief in the band.  That support was and is justified, too.  That is because this record actually presents the band as a group that really has made a valid attempt to evolve and grow away from the nonstop comparisons that it received upon the release of its debut album and EP.  ‘Age of Machine,’ the album’s lead single serves well to support the noted statement.  It will be discussed shortly.  ‘The Barbarians,’ one of the album’s later entries, is another way in which that growth and evolution is exhibited in this record.  It will be discussed a little later.  The album’s contemplative midpoint, ‘Tears of Rain’ is yet another example of the band’s growth and evolution.  It will also be discussed later.  All three songs examined here do their own part to show Greta Van Fleet’s growth on its latest album.  When they are considered along with the rest of the album’s entries, the whole makes the album a record that while maybe not perfect, still an improvement over its predecessors and gives some hope for the band’s future.

Greta Van Fleet’s recently released sophomore album, The Battle at Garden’s Gateis a strong new statement from the band.  It is a statement of growth and development from the up-and-coming new wave of classic rock act.  That is proven in part through the album’s lead single, ‘Age of Machine.’ The song is a stark stylistic contrast to the band’s existing body of work. The song’s arrangement sets a decidedly brooding atmosphere through the use of its guitars, bass, and heavy drums. Yes, front man Joshua Kiszka is still easily likened to Led Zeppelin front man Robert Plant here, but that is the closest comparison that one can make here.  The production that is used in the song gives the sound from the band in whole a certain echo effect. The guitar riffs throw back to the golden age of rock thanks to that production and their own approach. The drums and bass collectively sound so full, too, while the use of the choral vocal element adds its own touch to the song. 

The lyrical content that accompanies the song’s musical arrangement touches on a familiar topic. According to information provided about the song, its lyrics center on “the influence of technology on modern life; the role conflict plays in the global sphere; the deceptive fulfillment of tangible riches; and philosophical questions about life, love and power.”

Jake Kiszka offered an explanation on the song’s lyrical theme during a recent interview ahead of the song’s debut.

“It’s reflecting a lot of the world that we’ve seen, and I think that it’s reflecting a lot of personal truth.  What [front man] Josh  does very well with the lyrics is telling ancient tales with a contemporary application,” said Jake.

Drummer Danny Wagner built on his band mate’s comments with his own thoughts.

“We realized that while growing up, we had been shielded by many things, and we were unaware of a lot of things,” said Wagner.  “And then we were thrown out into this huge world, and it was a bit of a culture shock at first.  But as we started to travel a lot, meet new and different people and experience different cultures, our definition of ‘normal’ changed.”

Bassist Sam Kiszka also shared his thoughts on the band’s single.

“I suppose that everything has changed except what got us here in the first place,” added Sam.  “Everything – our perception of the world, perception of life itself, what it means to be an artist, what it means to be part of a beautiful, gorgeous society.  We’ve gained a larger understanding of why we’re all here.”

’Age of Machine’ is just one of the songs that serves to exhibit Greta Van Fleet’s growth in this album.  As noted, ‘The Barbarians’ is another example of that growth and development.

The familiar neo-classic rock sound and stylistic approach for which Greta Van Fleet has come to be known over such a short time is just as present here as in ‘Age of Machine’ and the other songs featured in this album.  The thing is that even with that in mind, this song still holds its own unique identity separate from the album’s other works.  There is more of a brooding, almost contemplative nature to this composition.  That is in comparison to all of the other work featured in the album.  The seeming tightness and warmth from the guitar and the definition in the drums and bass serves well to translate that feeling.  It is just one part of what makes the song stand out.  The lyrical content that accompanies the song makes for its own interest.

In the case of the lyrical content featured here, it comes across as a familiar commentary about mankind’s tendency toward conflict.  That is inferred with some clarity in the song’s lead verse and chorus, which state, “Children with their toys of war/ Birthright of death with a fiery breath/Funeral of innocence/Painted up in the red and dressed in lead/We are/Are we prisoners or renegades?/Well, I’ve done my time, woah/Behold visions of burning skies/Alas, Babylon/Woah, whoah, whoah, whoah.”  The seeming commentary is made even clearer in the song’s second, brief verse, which states, “Mothers of barbarians, woah/Were your young so spry when they left to die?/We are”  This is all just this critic’s interpretation, but it certainly seems in this case, that the song is addressing people’s tendency toward war and fighting in general.  If in fact that is the case, then it would make sense that the song’s arrangement is so brooding and contemplative in its nature.  Keeping that in mind, the whole here shows even more why the album is at least somewhat of a growth from GFV’s debut EP and album.  It is just one more example of the album’s strength.  The album’s even more contemplative midpoint, ‘Tears of Rain’ is yet another example of the continued growth in Greta Van Fleet as a unit.

‘Tears of Rain’ is a deeply moving, semi-acoustic work whose depth creates so much emotional impact for audiences.  The simple strumming on the guitar alongside the vocals here work with the piano and electric guitar line to tug at listeners’ heart strings.  To a point, one can make more of a comparison to works from The Beatles than Led Zeppelin.  The song’s musical arrangement is just one of its positives.  The lyrical content that accompanies the song’s musical arrangement makes for its own appeal.

The lyrical theme featured in ‘Tears of Rain’ comes across as yet another social commentary, despite what the song’s title infers.  In this case, the commentary comes across as addressing the state of the world.  This is inferred in the song’s lead verse and chorus as they state, “Bathing in the light around us/Praying for the night to comfort thee/Dancing on the coals below us/Praying for the flood to set us free/And the planet is still turning/And the faces are still burning/And the mother with their children/search for the rain.  That mention of the rain circles back to the song’s title.  The rest of the lead verse and chorus it seems to comment on all the negativity and how we are just wishing for things to get better and the suffering to end.  The song’s second verse tends to lean in the same direction as it states, “Drifting through the plains before us/As it turns to dust before our eyes/Pleading for a god to pour us/Just a little bit of rain from an empty sky.”  Again, here is that call for some higher power to make things better in all of the misery.  It makes the song’s moody musical arrangement make more sense, looking at all of this.  To that end, the song is just one more example of what makes The Battle at Garden’s Gate a positive new offering from Greta Van Fleet.  When this and the other songs featured in the album, the whole makes the album a record that while not perfect, still a mostly enjoyable new addition to this year’s field of new rock albums.

Greta Van Fleet’s sophomore album, Battle at Garden’s Gate is a record that is worth hearing at least once.  That is proven through its musical and lyrical content alike.  The content shows some growth from the band members themselves and as a collective.  It shows that the band cannot still be solely likened to Led Zeppeling, even despite the clear vocal similarities.  That will always be unavoidable.  Regardless, the arrangements and lyrical themes show the band is growing and changing.  When they are considered along with the rest of the album’s songs, the whole makes the album an unsuspectingly positive addition to this year’s field of new rock records.  Battle at Garden’s Gate is available now through Lava/Republic Records.  More information on the album is available along with all of the band’s latest news at:

Websitehttps://mywaysoon.com

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/gretavanfleet

Twitterhttps://twitter.com/GretaVanFleet

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Dirty Honey’s Self-Titled Debut LP Succeeds Because Of Its Fully Accessible Musical, Lyrical Content

Courtesy: Dirt Records

Independent rock and roll act Dirty Honey will release Friday, what is one of 2021’s most  welcome and best new pure guitar rock albums in its self-titled album.  The eight-song record has been the subject of a lot of hype since 2019, and it can be said that the album lives up to that hype and then some.  That is evidenced clearly through the 28-minute album’s musical arrangements and lyrical themes, all of which are fully accessible.  One of the songs featured in the album that serves to support the noted statements comes halfway through its nearly half-hour run time in the form of ‘Hold My Hand.’  This song will be discussed shortly.  ‘Another Last Time,’ which closes out the album, is another example of how its musical and lyrical content comes together to make the album so engaging and entertaining.  It will be discussed a little later.   ‘The Wire,’ one of the album’s early entries, is yet another example of the importance of the album’s collective content.  It will also be discussed later.  All three songs examined here are important in their own way to the success of Dirty Honey’s self-titled debut album.  When they are considered along with the rest of the album’s songs, the whole makes Dirty Honey a work that every guitar rock purist will enjoy.

Dirty Honey’s self-titled debut album is a strong start for the up-and-coming neo-classic rock quartet.  The album’s success comes collectively through its musical arrangements and lyrical themes.  One of the songs that most notably exemplifies the noted statements comes halfway through the album in the form of ‘Take My Hand.’  The musical arrangement in this song is the polar opposite of that in the album’s lead single, ‘California Dreamin’’.  Not to get too far off topic, but ‘California Dreamin’ is not to be confused with the song made popular by The Mamas and the Papas way back in 1965.  rather, this song is its own, original composition.  Getting back on the matter at hand, the musical arrangement featured in ‘Take My Hand’ immediately lends itself to comparison to works from the likes of Small Town Titans and Audioslave.  The Audioslave comparison should come as no surprise considering that Dirty Honey worked with producer Nick DiDia on this album.  DiDia worked with Tom Morello and his band mates in Rage Against the Machine (whose members eventually formed Audioslave after a split with front man Zach De La Rocha in 2000).  Clearly DiDia’s own creative influence came into play here, considering that history.  The guitar arrangement, the drums and bass all immediately mirror works from Audioslave.  Front man Marc LaBelle’s vocal fiery vocal delivery style and sound is itself even comparable to that of the late, great Chris Cornell here, making the Audioslave comparison even clearer.  For all that the song’s musical arrangement does to make it stand out, it is just a portion of what makes the song (and album) work.  The lyrical content that accompanies the song’s musical content also plays into that success.

The lyrical content featured in ‘Take My Hand’ stands out because of the discussion that it will generate.  It would seem that, in listening closely, the song’s lyrical content presents a message about letting go of the past and just moving forward in life.  This is inferred in the song’s lead verse, in which Labelle sings, “No time to change/The mistakes you made/And if I carry the weight/It’s the price I have to pay/But I wanted all your love/And I needed all your love…take my hand/You’ll understand/I’m just a sinner, too/There’s no way out/We’re headed south/I’m lonely just like you.”  This alone would seem to hint at someone telling another person that he/she knows about the other person’s past but that said person needs to just leave the past in the past because things in the present are what they are and that other person is not alone in his/her situation.  The seeming message continues in the song’s second verse, with LaBelle singing, “Hide in the light/Stories that you told/Paying no mind/To your wicked ways of old/When I wanted all your love/And I needed all your love/It drove me out of my mind/Take my hand/You might understand/I’m just a sinner, too/There’s no way out/We’re headed south/Don’t play me for a fool.”  Again, here is that seeming message of just letting go of the past, not letting it weigh one down mentally and emotionally.  LaBelle does not just come out and make clear if the overall lyrical theme has anything to do with perhaps a couple in a relationship or if this is just a general statement made from one person to another.  Regardless, the seeming message is relatively clear.  When it is paired with the song’s infectious musical arrangement, the whole makes the song a clear example of what makes the album’s musical and lyrical content so important to the album’s overall presentation.  ‘Another Last Time,’ which closes out the album, is another example of what makes Dirty Honey a successful presentation.

‘Another Last Time’ presents a musical arrangement that will itself find quite the interesting comparison.  The song’s opening bars lend themselves to comparison to Pearl Jam’s hit 1992 b-side, ‘Yellow Ledbetter.’  That comparison is brief, but is there.  From there, listeners will notice a sound and stylistic approach that is more akin to works from the Black Crowes, what with the combined use of the keyboard, choral type backing vocals, guitar, and drums.  It is a work that will appeal to any southern rock fan.  The tone in the song’s arrangement, that sense of melancholy, does well to help illustrate the familiar story featured in the song’s lyrical content.  The story in question comes across as being that familiar tale of the breakup of a romantic relationship, with the “last time” being metaphorical language for the one last go-round.

The breakup story is made even more as LaBelle’s subject adds in the song’s chorus, “Tell me what it takes/’Til you find your way back to me/And we’ll say/One last time/Another last time/Another go round and we say goodbye.”  That the song’s subject compares the woman in question to whiskey and rain, stating, “Lord knows when I’ll see her face again” in the song’s lead verse adds even more to the clear story.  He even notes that the woman has “Got me wondering/Why I’m holding on to this,” making even clearer, the noted statement.  This is a mournful, melancholy song about a relationship’s end, thus the lyrical and musical content.  The thing is that it is more of an introspective and retrospective look at that relationship.  This is something to which many listeners will relate, proving its accessibility.  When it is paired with the song’s equally accessible southern rock stylistic approach and sound, the whole continues to prove the role of the musical and lyrical content featured in Dirty Honey’s self-titled debut album.  It is just one more example of that importance, too.  ‘The Wire,’ which comes early in the album’s body, is one more example of what makes the album’s collective content so important to its success.

‘The Wire’ presents a musical arrangement that is one of the most unique of the album’s compositions.  The song’s arrangement immediately exhibits influences from the likes of AC/DC, Led Zeppelin, and even the aforementioned Black Crowes.  Even with so many distinctly different influences presented here, the band still manages to craft a song that is unique and that boasts its own identity.  The energy exuded by the song’s musical arrangement is important to examine because it helps to translate the message presented through the song’s lyrical content.

The message presented in ‘The Wire’ is that of a man who knows he needs to get away from a woman who is not good for him, but he can’t help but keep going back to her.  That is evidenced as LaBelle sings, “This wasn’t part of the plan/I  never wanted to see you again/I’m a fool for you/And those things that you do/Can’t get this picture of you out of my head…I’ve been walking the wire/And I’ve been walking your wire for too long…turn and walk away.”  This is just the song’s lead verse, but it makes relatively clear the noted inference.  The song’s second verse continues the statement as LaBelle sings, “Thought it would get better with time/But your kisses, baby/They still blow my mind/I’m a fool for you/And those things that you do/The way that you love me is such a crime.”  That last statement about the mistreatment in the relationship is the most telling.  Again, this is someone who knows he is in a bad situation, but can’t bring himself to just walk away.  He keeps getting drawn back into the toxic situation because “your kisses, baby/They still blow my mind.”  While the song is sung from the vantage point of a man, women could relate just as much.  That is because they get into the same situations.  To that end, the song’s lyrical theme proves its accessibility even more.  The energy exhibited through the song’s musical arrangement does well to help illustrate the subject’s mixed mindset.  Together, the two elements join to make this song another standout addition to Dirty Honey, showing once more why the record’s musical and lyrical content collectively makes it such a successful offering.  When this song and the other examined here are considered along with the rest of the album’s songs, the whole leaves no question about the engagement and entertainment that the record offers.  All things considered, it leaves no doubt that the album is one of this year’s top new independent and rock albums.

Dirty Honey’s self-titled debut album is a strong first offering from the up-and-coming rock band.  It succeeds as much as it does because of its combined musical and lyrical content.  The record’s musical arrangements exhibit influences of some of the most talented and respected bands past and present throughout.  Even with those influences noted, the arrangements still boast their own unique, engaging, and enjoyable identities.  They are fully accessible and enjoyable compositions from one to the next.  The lyrical themes featured in the album’s featured songs are just as engaging and accessible as their musical counterparts.  All three of the songs examined here more than support the noted statements.  When they are considered alongside the rest of the songs featured in this record, the whole makes Dirty Honey a standout addition to this year’s field of new rock and independent albums.  Dirty Honey is scheduled for release Friday through Dirt Records.

More information on Dirty Honey’s new record is available along with the group’s latest news at:

Websitehttps://www.dirtyhoney.com

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/DirtyHoneyMusic

Twitterhttps://twitter.com/dirtyhoneyband

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

The Lancasters Takes On Scammers In New Single, Video

Courtesy: Rivertale Productions/Fuzzy Cracklins Records/Epidemic Records

Independent rock band The Lancasters debuted its latest single last week, along with its companion video.

The band premiered its new single, ‘Scallywag‘ and its companion video April 5. The musical arrangement featured in The Lancasters’ new single bears a notable classic rock vibe in the vein of Lynyrd Skynyrd. That is evidenced through the use of the distorted slide guitar, the rich sound of the drums and equally steady bass line. One could just as easily make a comparison (albeit slight) to works from Led Zeppelin.

The lyrical theme that accompanies the song’s musical arrangement takes on scammers who use television and other media to take people’s money.

Front man Dave (his last name was not provided in the news release announcing the single and video’s premiere) talked about the song’s lyrical theme.

“I have to say that I really enjoy it when I find people chatting about stars and cosmic flows that bring some kind of energy,” he said. “But what I enjoy the most is to sabotage these s****y fake beliefs from the inside”

Dave’s band mates Steve and Fred (their last names also were not provided in the noted press release) expanded on those statements.

“It’s kind of a personal revenge, we can’t stand these pricks and the lies they spread on TV,” they said. “All that glitters is not gold, sometimes it’s just plastic garbage.”

The video for ‘Scallywag’ illustrates and translates the band members’ statements. It features the trio as a group of fake psychics trying to scam viewers as the song plays over the silly visuals.

More information on The Lancasters’ new single and video is available along with all of the band’s latest news at:

Website: https://thelancastersband.bandcamp.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thelancastersband

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Greta Van Fleet Debuts New Single, ‘Heat Above’

Courtesy: Lava/Republic Records

Greta Van Fleet debuted its latest single this week.

The band debuted its new single ‘Heat Above‘ Wednesday. The song is the third single from the band’s forthcoming album The Battle at Garden’s Gate, which is scheduled for release April 16 through Lava/Republic Records. It follows the premiere of the album’s singles ‘Age of Machine‘ and ‘My Way, Soon.’

The musical arrangement featured in ‘Heat Above’ continues to show Greta Van Fleet’s evolving growth away from its comparisons to Led Zeppelin. While front man Joshua Kizka’s vocals still closely resemble those of Robert Plant, that is the only real link to Led Zeppelin this song has. Kizka’s vocals, as a matter of fact, pair with the song’s instrumentation here to make the song overall just as comparable to works from Rush as to those from Led Zeppelin.

No explanation of the song’s lyrical theme was provided in the press release distributed Wednesday about the song’s debut. That aside, the lyrical content that accompanies the song’s musical arrangement is sure to connect with listeners in its own right.

In other news, the track listing for The Battle at Garden’s Gate was revealed Wednesday. The listing is noted below.

Complete track-listing:

1.  Heat Above

2.  My Way, Soon

3.  Broken Bells

4.  Built by Nations

5.  Age of Machine

6.  Tears of Rain

7.  Stardust Chords

8.  Light My Love

9.  Caravel

10. The Barbarians

11. Trip the Light Fantastic

12. The Weight of Dreams

More information on Greta Van Fleet’s new single is available along with all of the band’s latest news at:

Websitehttps://mywaysoon.com

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/gretavanfleet

Twitterhttps://twitter.com/GretaVanFleet

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Any Guitar Rock Purist Will Appreciate The Straddlerz’ Self-Titled Debut LP

Courtesy: Independent Music Promotions

Independent rock act The Straddlerz’ self-titled debut album is among the most notable of this year’s new independent albums.  Released by the duo – Linda Filippin (vocals) and Michael Reynal (guitars) — Jan. 29, the nine-song record is continued proof that independent music acts deserve just as much attention and credit as their more well-known mainstream counterparts.  That is proven easily through the recording’s musical and lyrical content.  The record’s musical arrangements take influence from some of the greatest music of the 1960s, 70s, and even 80s for its own original compositions while the lyrical content generates its own share of entertainment and engagement.  Case in point is the bluesy ‘Don’t Go Away,’ which comes late in the 35-minute record’s run.  It will be discussed shortly.  ‘Without You,’ with its driving vintage guitar rock sound is another example of why this band and its debut album deserve so much attention.  It will be addressed a little later.  ‘Circle of Insanity,’ which forms a portion of the album’s midpoint, is yet another example of how this album has managed to stand out among this year’s field of new rock and even independent albums.  When it and the other songs noted here are considered with the rest of the album’s content, the whole proves it is as deserving of its own spot on this year’s list of top new independent albums.

The Straddlerz’ self-titled debut album is a work that guitar rock purists and independent music devotees alike will appreciate.  That is because its musical arrangements and lyrical content collectively shows it is just as powerful a presentation as anything that its more well-known mainstream counterparts have crafted in recent years.  ‘Don’t Go Away’ is just one way in which the noted statements are supported.  Right from its opening strains, the song’s arrangement lends itself to comparisons to Led Zeppelin’s performance of ‘Babe I’m Gonna Leave You.’  That is evidenced in the slow, bluesy sound of the guitar and the steady drums and bass.  Filippin’s vocal delivery even lends itself to that comparison in its own way.  Making the arrangement even more interesting is that the noted comparison is juxtaposed by the song’s much heavier chorus sections.  The heavy, grinding sound of the whole in the chorus is more of a modern garage influence.  The contrast of those two styles is balanced expertly and ensures listeners’ engagement and entertainment.  Interestingly enough, the musical content featured in this recording is not the only aspect that takes a cue from Robert Plant and company.  The song’s very title is its own ironic echo of Led Zeppelin’s song, as is the lyrical content that accompanies that title and musical content.

Filippin sings in the song’s lead verse, “Stay with me/Don’t go away/Tell me a story/I can believe…The dream is over/My mind’s wide open/And I see now/The  her is bad/It’s just me and myself/And I say/Don’t go/Don’t go far away/Don’t go away/Don’t go away.”  Some of the lyrics in this verse are difficult to decipher sans lyrics sheet to reference, but the seeming message here is relatively clear even at this point.  Filippina continues in the song’s second verse, “Your touch/On my skin/Soft like those flowers in spring/You left me here/With no goodbyes/Now I say/Don’t go away/Don’t turn away.”  At this point, the song’s lyrical message leaves virtually no doubt as to its topic.  This is, as inferred, one of those songs that centers on a breakup, much as with Led Zeppelin’s take of ‘Babe, I’m Gonna Leave You.’  Even with such comparisons, The Straddlerz’ song still boasts its own unique identity, showing in its own way musically and lyrically why the band and is debut album are equally deserving of respect.  It is just one of the songs that makes clear why the noted respected is so deserved.  ‘Without You’ is another way in which the noted statements are supported.

‘Without You’ is, musically speaking, a direct contrast to ‘Don’t Go Away.’  This song, with its fuzzed guitar and vocals, rich drum sound and bass, is a powerful indie-garage rock style work that lends itself to comparisons to some of the greatest works of Joan Jett & The Blackhearts, while also again incorporating some more modern garage rock influence to enrich the song even more.  It is a sound that both in its execution and production does so well to create that sense of nostalgia that succeeds so well where so many other bands, both well-known and not, have failed.  It is an infectious work that in even just under three-and-a-half minutes, leaves listeners feeling fulfilled by the time it hits that last note.  The song’s  lyrical content works with the fiery energy in the musical arrangement to make for even more engagement and entertainment.

The lyrical content featured in ‘Without You’ is, as the song’s title suggests, another work that centers on the topic of a relationship.  In the case of this song, the song’s subject is more confident.  Much of the song’s lyrical content is difficult to decipher because of the song’s production – there is a lot of fuzz even on the vocal track here – but there are points at which Filippin’s vocals are decipherable, and they make the message clear.  There is a point at which Fillipin sings about having a “view from the dark/And I’m ready to shine” that hints at that confidence.  As the song continues to  progress, she makes mention of giving “No mercy at all” which bolsters the inferred statement even more before stating just as forcefully, “I’m gonna feel what I want to/Without you.”  Simply put, this is someone who feels wholly liberated from a bad situation and is embracing the end of that broken relationship.  It is another point that is certain to resonate with listeners, what with the strength exuded in the lyrical content and equally fiery musical arrangement.  The whole makes this song another clear example of why The Straddlerz’ self-titled debut album is such a strong start for the duo.  It is just one more of the ways in which the album shows its strength.  ‘Circle of Insanity’ is yet another way in which the album shows it holds its own against so many of its counterparts.

‘Circle of Insanity’ takes a cue from another classic rock icon in its musical arrangement, this time not only Joan Jett and company, but also the one and only Lita Ford.  That latter is especially evidenced in the driving metal approach taken here.  Yes, there is a hint of the semi-punk style of Jett and company, but the metal influence is far more prevalent here.  Even Filippin’s vocal delivery style matches that of Ford more than Jett.  That musical content couples with the song’s lyrical content to make for even more engagement and entertainment. 

In the case of this song’s lyrical content, once again much of the noted content is difficult to decipher.  However, at least the chorus and some of the verses can be deciphered.  From what can be understood, it would seem that the song here is focused more on the subject’s connection in general to someone else, not romantically, but plutonically.  That is inferred as Fillipin noted in the chorus sings that “this life drives me insane.”  There are points in the chorus in which she also makes note of wanting to change and not be like another unidentified person.  Early on in the song’ Fillipin’s subject even tells the unidentified person, “You don’t really understand me” and that “I hate your point of view,” adding, “I don’t want to be like you.”  So clearly this song has nothing to do with romance at all.  Maybe it is the subject standing up to someone in a household or even someone she/he knows who is not the best person in the world.  Whoever that person is, the subject has had enough of that person and is letting that person know it, too.  It is another wholly accessible theme to which plenty of listeners will relate.  Add the fiery energy in the song’s classic metal style arrangement, and the song becomes even more powerful among the album’s entries.  When it is considered along with the other songs examined here and the rest of the album’s works, the whole proves itself a presentation that is easily just as enjoyable as anything that The Straddlerz’ more well-known mainstream counterparts have crafted.

The Straddlerz’ self-titled debut album, released independently by the band Jan. 29, is a powerful work that any guitar rock purist will find enjoyable.  That is proven throughout the album from start to finish through its musical and lyrical content.  The songs examined here do well to help support the noted statements.  When those songs are considered along with the rest of the album’s other songs, the whole becomes a work that continues to prove why independent acts deserve just as much respect and attention as their more well-known mainstream counterparts.  That respect and attention could potentially make a band, such as The Straddlerz one of the next big mainstream rock acts.  The Straddlerz is available now.  More information on the album is available along with all of the band’s latest news at:

Website: https://thestraddlerz.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thestraddlerzofficial

Twitter: https://twitter.com/straddlerz

To keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.   

Saxon Announces Title, Release Date, Specs For New Covers Collection

Courtesy: Silver Linings Music

Saxon will open the new year with a new covers record.

The band is scheduled to release its new collection, aptly titled Inspirations, March 19 through Silver Linings Music. The 11-song record features covers of songs from bands, such as The Rolling Stones, AC/DC, and Thin Lizzy. Audiences can hear the band’s cover of The Rolling Stones’ famed song ‘Painted Black,’ which is featured in the compilation, here.

Front man Biff Byford, who released his own solo record School of Hard Knocks this year, talked about the band’s new compilation during a recent interview.

“We wanted to do an album based on our influences, the songs and bands that inspired us to write what we did and still do, and it was also interesting to see what my voice could do as I haven’t sung many of these songs before,” said Byford.  “We didn’t want to change any of the songs too much, just play them more like Saxon.  And we also think it’s very important to have – and share with the fans – some fun in these dark times.”

Alongside the noted covers, Saxon’s forthcoming compilation also features covers of songs from other acts, such as Motorhead, Toto, and Led Zeppelin. The collection was recorded at Brockfield Hall near York, in the United Kingdom. the structure was constructed in 1804 and houses the largest collection of paintings from Yorkshire’s impressionist artists — The Staiths.

Byford talked about recording in the facility during his noted interview.

“The warmth and feel of Inspirations had so much to do with being together in this magnificent place and doing it ‘old-school’ style,” said Byford. “This is how many bands back in the day -including some of the ones covered here- made such great albums, so it just felt really good to be able to do this somewhere like Brockfield Hall.”

Inspirations‘ track listing is noted below. The album will release on CD, vinyl, and digital outlets. Pre-orders are open.

Track Listing:

  1. Paint It Black
  2. Immigrant Song
  3. Paperback Writer
  4. Evil Woman
  5. Stone Free
  6. Bomber
  7. Speed King
  8. The Rocker
  9. Hold The Line
  10. Problem Child
  11. See My Friends

 More information on Inspirations is available online now along with all of the band’s latest news and more at:

Websitehttp://www.saxon747.com

Facebookhttp://www.facebook.com/saxon

Twitterhttp://twitter.com/SaxonOfficial

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.