Brady Rymer And The Little Band That Could Have One Of 2020’s Best New Holiday Music Compilations In Its New EP

Courtesy: Bumblin’ Bee Records

Family entertainer Brady Rymer is keeping himself busy this year.  Rymer released his latest album Songs Across The Pond over the summer.  The record was a collaboration with fellow family entertainer David Gibb.  Later this month he will host a free livestream concert.  The performance is scheduled to take place noon ET on Dec. 19 through Rymer’s official Facebook page.  Additionally, Rymer and his fellow musicians The Little Band That Could debuted their latest single, ‘Angels in The Snow’ Friday.  The song is the lead single from the group’s new holiday compilation by the same name, which was released Nov. 6 through Bumblin’ Bee Records.  The record is among the most unique of this year’s new holiday music compilations if not the year’s most unique.  That is due in no small part to the record’s featured songs, which will be discussed shortly.  The musical arrangements that are featured within the four song EP add their own share of interest to the record, and will be discussed a little later.  The songs’ sequencing rounds out the most important of the EP’s elements.  When it is considered with the noted other items, the whole of those items makes Angels in the Snow a holiday music compilation that the whole family will enjoy.

Angels in the Snow, the new holiday music compilation from Brady Rymer & The Little Band That Could, is presentation that holds is own against its counterparts in this year’s field of new holiday music compilations.  That is due in no small part to the record’s featured songs.  Of the four songs that make up the record’s body, three are originals.  Only one – ‘My Favorite Things’ – is a cover.  The album’s lead single and title track does incorporate the traditional holiday song ‘Angels We Have Heard on High,’ but its use in that song is minimal at best.  It is more of a “supporting element” to the bigger composition than its focus.  Even the lyrical themes in the songs are largely original, making the songs even more engaging and entertaining.  ‘Why, Daddy, Why’ for instance is something to which every parent and child can relate.  It finds a young child asking his/her dad why he/she has to wait to open his/her presents on Christmas morning.  The anticipation  is so difficult for the child as he/she has to wait for his/her parents to get coffee first and do other things. 

While ‘My Favorite Things’ is at its heart, a cover of the timeless classic from The Sound of Music, this version presents the “favorite things” of a dog.  Among those favorite things are: hanging the dog’s head out the window of a moving vehicle, feeling snowflakes fall on its nose, and “naps in the cool shade.”  So even while they have covered a classic here, Rymer and company still give the song a new, unique touch that adds even more to the appeal to its presentation and that of the EP.

‘Writing A Letter to Santa Claus’ is another way in which the EP’s songs show their own importance.  This song is straight forward.  It is told from the vantage point of a child who is writing that letter to Santa with all of his/her wishes for Christmas.  What is really interesting about the song’s lyrical theme is that while yes, there are wishes for certain toys and other items, the letter also tells Santa that the child wants to ride in his sleigh, etc.  So it’s not just about the toys.  That adds even more appeal to the song.  In turn, it adds even more appeal to the EP overall.  Keeping that in mind along with the content in the other noted songs and their overall originality, no doubt is left at this point as to the importance of the songs featured in Rymer and company’s new EP to its presentation.  They are just a portion of what makes the record stand out.  The musical arrangements featured within the songs add their own touch to the EP’s presentation, too.

The arrangements that are featured within Angels in the Snow are just as original as the songs themselves.  They are also diverse.  The EP’s closer, ‘Writing A Letter to Santa’ presents a vintage country/western style arrangement, complete with the slide guitar twang that is so trademark to the genre and the just as audible twang in Rymer’s vocal delivery.  The subtle addition of the organ (likely a Hammond B3) and the gentle snare drum rolls enriches the song’s arrangement even more.  Much the same can be said of the addition of the sleigh bells just as Rymer mentions the reindeer.

The simple arrangement featured in the EP’s title track/opener lends itself ever so slightly to works from Soul Asylum, giving listeners even more musical variety.  As a matter of fact, one could argue that Rymer’s vocal delivery here lends itself just as slightly to not just Soul Asylum front man Dave Pirner, but also to The Rolling Stones front man Mick Jagger.  The Jagger comparison is especially audible in the song’s choruses while the comparison to Pirner is more noticeable in the verses.  The stylistic approach to the song’s instrumentation, what with the use of the drums, keyboards, and guitar add to the comparison to Soul Asylum works.  The equally subtle use of the bells adds its own special touch to the song’s arrangement.  The whole of this arrangement is just one more exhibition of how the record’s musical content makes the record’s musical side so important.  The arrangement featured in ‘Why, Daddy, Why’ is yet another example of what makes the record’s musical presentation so important.

The musical arrangement featured in ‘Why, Daddy, Why’ takes listeners back to the 1960s.  This arrangement is one that will especially appeal to parents (and even grandparents).  That is thanks to the use of the horns, piano, and drums.  The immediate comparison that comes to this critic’s mind is that of Dr. John.  Such comparison is due more to the song’s instrumentation here than Rymer’s performance.  The energy is there, but is also just controlled enough to paint a rich of that child on the stairs, head in hands, waiting so patiently yet anxiously.  At the same time, the overall sound conjures those thoughts of those night clubs from days gone by.  It is an arrangement in whole that has so much substance, in other words, and is certain to appeal to listeners of all ages.  When this is considered along with the appeal in the other songs addressed here and with that of Rymer’s updated take of ‘My Favorite Things,’ the arrangements in whole prove to be just as important to the EP’s presentation as its songs.  Together, these two elements more than ensure listeners’ engagement and enjoyment, and are just a portion of what makes the record stand out.  The songs’ sequencing rounds out the EP’s most important elements.

In listening through the course of Angels in Snow, listeners will note that the 13-minute record is mostly a gentle, relaxed presentation.  Its mid-tempo opener, more relaxed take of ‘My Favorite Things’ and reserved energy in its closer collectively keep its mood relatively relaxed without being too slow.  ‘Why, Daddy, Why’ meanwhile breaks up that more relaxed sense that populates most of the song, what with its more excited energy and lyrical content.  In breaking up the album and changing things up even momentarily, that variance helps to make the record’s sequencing just as impacting as the EP’s overall content.  Keeping this in mind, the positive result of the EP’s sequencing shows its importance just as much as the EP’s songs and their musical arrangements.  All things considered, they make the record in whole a surprisingly welcome musical gift that the whole family will enjoy.

Brady Rymer & The Little Band The Could have released in its new EP Angels in the Snow, a work that is among the best of this year’s new holiday music compilations if not the year’s best overall.  That is proven in part through the songs that make up the record’s body.  They are largely original compositions instead of covers.  Their lyrical content is original, too, even in the cover of ‘My Favorite Things.’  The arrangements that accompany the songs and their lyrical content are original in their own right.  This adds even more pleasure to the listening experience in the case of this EP.  The record’s sequencing rounds out its most important elements.  It ensures listeners’ engagement and enjoyment just as much as the record’s content because of how it balances the EP’s energy.  Each item noted here is important in its own way to the whole of the record.  All things considered they make Angels in the Snow a record that will find plenty of plays any holiday season. 

Angels in the Snow is available now. More information on the album is available along with Brady Rymer’s latest news at:

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The Rolling Stones’ Latest Live Recording Is As Solid As Steel

Courtesy: Eagle Rock Entertainment

The true greatest rock band in the world returned this week with another new archived live recording.  The band in question is The Rolling Stones and the recording in question is one of its three December 1989 concerts in Atlantic City, NJ in support of its then new album Steel Wheels.  The performance was part of the band’s “Steel Wheels/Urban Jungle” tour, which was the band’s first American tour since 1981.  The recording is another presentation that will appeal to The Rolling Stones’ fans just as much as rock fans in general just as much as the multitude of previous live recordings.  That count is almost at 20 counting (not counting this recording) if not right at said figure.  The main reason that audiences will appreciate the recording so much is its extensive set list. The list, which runs approximately two-and-a-half hours in length, will be discussed shortly.  The band’s performance thereof adds to the enjoyment in its own way.  This will be addressed a little later.  The recording’s production values round put the finishing touch to its presentation.  When it is considered along with the set list and the band’s performance, the elements collectively make the recording another welcome way to beat the live music blues this and any year.

The Rolling Stones’ latest live recording is another fully immersive, enjoyable presentation for the band’s most devoted fans and rock fans in general.  In an age when live music has been relegated to watching concerts online, this offering from the greatest rock band in the world is its own welcome offering and alternative to being glued to a computer or phone screen.  That is proven in part through the recording’s extensive set list.  The 28-song set list spans a run time of approximately two-and-a-half hours.  It takes audiences all the way back to 1965 and the band’s fourth album Out Of Our Heads and all the way up to its then most recent album, 1989’s Steel Wheels.  Given, not every album in-between is represented in the set list, but in comparison to the set lists featured in the band’s past live recordings, audiences do get some songs not featured in those presentations.  The band’s five nods to Steel Wheels are themselves works that have rarely if ever been featured in the noted previous live presentations.  The band’s cover of Bob & Earl’s ‘Harlem Shuffle’ and its performance of its own single ‘Undercover of the Night’ (from 1983) are in themselves live rarities.  So audiences have all of that to enjoy.  Along with the noted songs, audiences also get more familiar songs, such as ‘Honky Tonk Women,’ ‘Jumpin’ Jack Flash,’ and ‘Tumblin’ Dice’ among others.  As if all of that is not enough, the band also pulls ‘2,000 Light Years From Home,’ ‘Happy,’ and ‘Salt of the Earth’ as some semi-rare works from its catalog.  Also making this set list so enjoyable are guest appearances from blues legend John Lee Hooker, who joins the band for a performance of his own hit song ‘Boogie Chillen’ and a guest appearance by fellow blues legend Eric Clapton on that song and ‘Little Red Rooster.’

The set list in itself does a lot to make Steel Wheels Live appealing to audiences.  The set list proves itself even more critical to the recording’s presentation in that it is the exact same in the recording’s DVD, CD, digital and vinyl platforms.  In other words, audiences get the same presentation from one platform to the next.  This is important to note because even today, there are some acts out there whose live recordings vary across platforms.  So to have the same thing from one platform to the next makes the set list that much more important to the recording.

Additionally, the set list’s sequencing plays its own part to the recording’s presentation.  From the show’s opening up until the band takes on ‘Terrifying,’ the show’s energy remains relatively high.  It is not until the noted point that the band pulls things back.  The noted relaxation lasts only momentarily.  After that song and ‘Salt of the Earth,’ which features a guest appearance by Guns N’ Roses members Axl Rose and Izzy Stradlin, the show’s energy picks back up.  Their performance alongside Mick Jagger and company will be addressed a little later.  ‘Honky Tonk Women’ slows things down again, but still manages to keep the concert’s energy flowing solidly thanks to its swagger.  The same can be said of ‘Midnight Rambler,’ too.  That song comes immediately after ‘Honky Tonk Women.’  From that point on, the show’s energy rises and falls in all of the right points and ways, showing without question the amount of time and thought that went into assembling the set list.  That effort paid off, too.  When this aspect is considered along with the set list’s presentation across the recording’s platforms and its breadth and depth, those elements collectively make the set list the most important aspect of this recording.  It builds a solid foundation for the recording’s presentation on which the band’s performance rests easily.

The Rolling Stones’ performance of Steel Wheels Live’s set list is important to note because it does its own part to keep audiences engaged and entertained.  Those audiences who are familiar with the band’s live show style already has an expected standard from the band.  Those audiences will be glad to know that the band lives up to that expectation here just as much as in the band’s past performances.  Front man Mick Jagger is just as confident as ever as he struts his way across the stage and sings.  That swagger is on full display just as much.  Guitarists Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood keep the energy moving along with drummer Charlie Watts, the trio’s work just as engaging as ever in its own right.  Wood and Richards’ prowess on their instruments makes one forget the woes of the world, especially as they make their way through the blues classic ‘Little Red Rooster’ alongside Eric Clapton.  The group’s performance is just as solid as it supports Rose and Stradlin in the collective’s performance of ‘Salt of the Earth.’  On a similar note, viewers will be pleased to see that Rose shares the stage with Jagger and company in that performance rather than trying to steal the spotlight.  It shows that he knows he and Stradlin are the guests here, not the stars.  Even when he gets the spotlight in ‘Cant’ Be Seen,’ Richards shows once again, his talent as a performer and not just a guitarist.  He and the band’s longtime backing vocalists make for so much enjoyment and engagement in their own way.  Between that aspect and the rest of the presentation in the concert, the band’s performance in whole makes for a wonderful experience.  It builds on the foundation formed by the show’s set list to make the recording even more enjoyable.  When the two elements are considered together, they give audiences even more reason to take in this concert.  They are still only a portion of what makes the recording so impressive.  Its production puts the finishing touch to its presentation.

Just as with all of The Rolling Stones’ past live recordings released through Eagle Rock Entertainment, the production here gives home viewers the best seat in the house.  When the cameras go out beyond the sea of people, audiences get a full picture of just how many people attended the concert, and the sheer immensity of the band’s stage setup.  The on-stage footage immerses audiences into the performance even more as it takes viewers along for the ride up close with the band.  The transitions from shot to shot throughout and the sound enrich the experience even more.  From a more relaxed moment, such as in ‘Sympathy for the Devil to the more fiery cover of ‘Harlem Shuffle’ and everywhere else, the guitars and vocals are so well-balanced with Watts’ time keeping and the work of the band’s fellow musicians.  Each performer gets an equal share of time in the limelight.  Considering that and the smooth camera transitions, no doubt is left about the impact of the concert’s production.  When this is considered along with the band’s performance and the concert’s set list, the whole of these elements makes Steel Wheels Live a presentation that is another welcome addition to The Rolling Stones and Eagle Rock Entertainment’s ongoing series of live recordings from the band.

Eagle Rock Entertainment and The Rolling Stones’ latest live recording Steel Wheels Live is yet another welcome addition to the two sides’ ongoing series of live recordings.  That is proven in part through the recording’s expansive set list.  The set list runs 26 songs deep and spans a run time of two-and-a-half hours.  Given, it is not a career-spanning set even for its time, but does still present a relatively clear cross section of the band’s catalog up to that point.  The band’s performance of the featured set list is everything that audiences have come to expect from The Rolling Stones.  The swagger and the energy is there from beginning to end.  The concert’s production values play their own part to the recording’s presentation.  Each noted item is important in its own way to the whole of this presentation.  All things considered, they make the recording as solid as steel.  Steel Wheels Live is available now.

More information on Steel Wheels Live is available along with all of its latest news at:

 

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‘Bridges To Buenos Aires’ Continues To Show Why The Rolling Stones Is One Of Rock’s Elite Acts

Courtesy: Eagle Rock Entertainment

The live recordings keep coming from The Rolling Stones.  Early this month, the band released another concert from its Bridges to Babylon Tour in the form of Bridges To Buenos Aires.  Originally recorded April 5, 1998 at the River Plate Stadium, the 22-song set is yet another enjoyable addition to the home library of any fan of The Rolling Stones.  That is due in part to the show’s set list.  The band’s performance thereof plays its own critical role in the show’s presentation.  The companion booklet that comes with the recording rounds out its most important elements.  Each item noted is key in its own way to the whole of this recording.  All things considered, they make the recording in whole yet another welcome addition to The Rolling Stones’ ongoing series of live recordings.

The Rolling Stones’ latest addition to its ongoing series of live recordings is yet another presentation that audiences will openly welcome into their libraries.  That is due in part to the concert’s set list.  The 22-song set list features many of the same songs featured in the band’s performance from its Bridges To Bremen show, with a handful of changes.  Once again, the band reaches back in its catalog, reaching as far back as 1967.  Fan favorites, such as ‘Start Me Up, ‘It’s Only Rock ‘n’ Roll (But I Like It)’ and ‘Gimme Shelter’ are all featured in this collection.  Others, such as ‘Memory Motel,’ ‘Anybody Seen My Baby’ and ‘Paint It Black’ are replaced here with ‘Sister Morphine,’ ‘When The Whip Comes Down’ and ‘Little Queenie,’ which reaches back to the band’s 1970 album Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out.  The rest of the show’s set list in this concert is the same as that featured in Bridges To Bremen.  For those audiences who do not already own Bridges To Bremen, the expansive set list presents audiences with a rich presentation of the band’s catalog.  Along with that rarely represented album – Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out – the set list also gives nods to the band’s 1969 album Let It Bleed, its 1967 album Between The Buttons and its 1968 album Beggar’s Banquet as well as Bridges To Babylon, on the back of which the band was touring at the time.  Simply put, the set list featured in this collection will appeal to audiences who already own any of the band’s previously released live recordings (released through Eagle Rock Entertainment) and those who might not own said recordings.  It is just one of the recording’s positives.  The band’s performance of the set list plays its own important part to the whole of the recording.

The band’s performance of the concert’s set list is notable because it shows the band as a unit, at the time, that was still at the top of its game, even more than three decades into its life.  The band’s performance of ‘Little Queenie’ is one example of that high level of entertainment.  The swagger exhibited by the band as it makes its way across the hydraulic bridge and energy in its performance is commendable to say the least.  Even as something is thrown at him, front man Mick Jagger doesn’t bat even an eyelash.  He just keeps going, not missing a beat or even giving recognition to whichever audience member threw the unidentified item at him.  Drummer Charlie Watts, decked out in his soccer jersey and guitarists Ronnie Wood and Keith Richards make their way around the band’s second stage with the ease of much younger performers, showing they are right in step with their younger counterparts.  The band members’ energy in the show’s opener – ‘(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction’ — provides just as much show of energy from the band as any other performance from the group.  Jagger struts his way across the stage, giving his full energy and attention to the audience and song at the same time.  Meanwhile Richards and Wood keep such a cool demeanor as they make their way through the song alongside Watts.  Much the same can be said of the band’s performance of ‘Jumpin’ Jack Flash.’  It shows this band even at that point, held its own easily against every one of its younger up-and-coming counterparts, proving once more why it is one of the elite acts in the rock and music community in general.   Between these performances and those of the rest of the shows set, the whole of the band’s performance gives audiences just as much to appreciate here as the set list itself.  It is just one more part of what makes the recording so enjoyable.  The companion booklet that comes with the recording rounds out its most important elements.

The companion booklet that comes with Bridges To Buenos Aires features liner notes composed by Journalist Paul Sexton.  Sexton paints a vivid picture of the concert contained in the presentation’s Blu-ray through his words. He writes in part about the band’s performance of ‘Flip The Switch,’ noting that it “offered the first cameo for now much-missed saxophonist mainstay Bobby Keys.”  He adds later of the performance of ‘Gimme Shelter,’ that vocalist Lisa Fischer’s performance is just as powerful as ever.  There is even mention of Bob Dylan’s surprise guest appearance for the band’s take on his timeless classic ‘Like A Rolling Stone’ in Sexton’s liner notes.  He writes in part here, “Bob’s [Dylan] customarily approximate vocal style certainly kept Mick on on his toes, but the bonhomie of the moment gave further warmth to a set that was growing ever more fierce and forceful.”  Here again is more proof of the power of Sexton’s description of the show, proving even more, the importance of his preview of the concert.  Sexton has much more to add about the concert, but that will be left for audience to discover for themselves.  Between the rest of the notes not discussed here and those items addressed, it goes without saying that Sexton’s notes are recommended to be taken in prior to taking in the concert itself.  Keeping this in mind, the importance of the recording’s liner notes couples with the power of the band’s performance and the importance of the show’s set list to make the recording in whole, yet another positive addition to The Rolling Stones’ ongoing live releases series, and a presentation that any fan of The Rolling Stones will welcome into his or her music library.

The Rolling Stones’ latest addition to its ongoing series of live recordings, Bridges To Buenos Aires is another wonderfully entertaining presentation from the band and Eagle Rock Entertainment.  It is a work that continues to prove why The Rolling Stones remains more than half a century into its existence, one of the rock (and music) community’s elite acts.  That is evidenced partly through the show’s set list.  The band’s performance thereof plays just as much into supporting the noted statements.  The liner notes featured in the recording’s companion booklet does just as much as the set and its performance to show the strength of the recording.  Each item noted here is important in its own way.  All things considered, they make Bridges To Buenos Aires another recording that builds and maintains the band’s bridges to its audiences.  It is available now.  More information on this and other titles from The Rolling Stones is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.rollingstones.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/therollingstones

Twitter: http://twitter.com/RollingStones

 

 

 

More information on this and other titles from Eagle Rock Entertainment is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.eagle-rock.com

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Twitter: http://twitter.com/EagleRockNews

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

‘Voodoo Lounge Uncut’ Re-Issue Is Another Success For Eagle Rock, The Rolling Stones

Courtesy: Eagle Rock Entertainment

Eagle Rock Entertainment and The Rolling Stones have been quite busy in recent years, releasing a variety of live recordings from the veteran rock band.  The two sides together, have released no fewer than 10 live recordings from the band’s years on the road.  Late last month, the two sides partnered to release yet another live recording, this time from the band’s 1994 North American tour in support of its then brand new album Voodoo Lounge.  The second new live recording from the two sides so far this year, – the first was the band’s recording No Security: San Jose ’99Voodoo Lounge Uncut is yet another wonderful addition to the collection of any Rolling Stones fan and rock music lover in general.  This is proven in part through the concert’s set list (and the band’s performance thereof), which will be discussed shortly.  The concert’s production is also important to note in examining the recording, and will be addressed a little later.  The companion booklet that is included with the recording rounds out the set’s most important elements, and will also be discussed later.  Each item noted here is important in its own way to the whole of Voodoo Lounge Uncut.  All things considered, they make Voodoo Lounge Uncut yet another must have for any fan of The Rolling Stones fan.

Eagle Rock Entertainment’s recent re-issue of The Rolling Stones’ Voodoo Lounge, aptly titled Voodoo Lounge Uncut, is a welcome new pressing of the recording, which was previously released in edited fashion on laser disc, DVD and VHS.  That is due in no small part to the concert’s set list.  The extensive 27-song set list is the complete presentation of the band’s classic concert, performed at Joe Robbie Stadium in Miami, Florida.  As is noted on the rear of the set’s packaging and in its companion booklet (again, that booklet will be discussed later), this release marks the first time that the expansive set list has been presented in whole.  The concert’s previous pressings featured significantly shortened set lists, which removed a total of 10 songs from the recordings.  In other words, audiences get in this set, the band’s entire show for the first time ever.  While not necessarily career-spanning, the set list featured here still pulls from a respectable portion of The Rolling Stones’ catalog.  Specifically speaking, it pulls from no less than a dozen of the band’s releases, including the band’s 1964 U.S. debut record The Rolling Stones (England’s Newest Hit Makers), its then latest album Voodoo Lounge and other albums, such as 12 X 5, Out Of Our Heads and Exile on Main StreetExile on Main Street is the most heavily represented of the albums featured in the set list, with four nods.  The bonus five-song set, which was recorded at Giants Stadium in New Jersey as part of the Voodoo Lounge tour, features two more songs from that album, bringing the total count there to six songs. Voodoo Lounge got a grand total of five nods between the two sets while Let It Bleed was represented by three songs.  The numbers vary from here, but simply put, the band reaches well back into its back catalog for this show, which is well-deserving of applause.

While the set list itself does a respectable job of representing The Rolling Stones’ catalog, it is just one part of the set list that deserves to be noted.  The set list’s actual order is just as important to the concert experience here as the set list itself.  Audiences will note that the set’s first seven songs are high-energy pieces.  From there, the band slows things down gradually, starting with ‘Beast of Burden.’  The band goes from there, to a short acoustic set that helps relax the concert’s mood.  The band’s performances of ‘It’s All Over Now’ and ‘Who Do You Love?’ – which features the one and only Bo Diddley joining the band for the performance – gradually pick up the concert’s set list again.  The show’s energy gradually increases more and more from there until guitarist Keith Richards takes the lead with performances of ‘Before They Make Me Run’ and ‘The Worst.’  That pullback is only brief, as things gradually pick back up again starting with the laid back vibe of ‘Sympathy for the Devil.’  Each song from there sees the show’s energy rise yet again right to the bombastic finale of ‘Jumpin’ Jack Flash.’  Simply put, the energy in the show’s set shows that a lot of thought and time was put into its sequencing.  The band wanted to make sure that audiences got the most bang for their buck, and it goes without saying that they got that and more, over the course of more than two-and-a-half hours.

While the expansive set list featured in Voodoo Lounge Uncut gives audiences to enjoy and appreciate from this recording, it is only one part of what makes the recording so enjoyable.  The band’s performance – including that of the touring musicians – builds on the foundation formed through the set list to make the recording even more enjoyable.  Front man Mick Jagger has all of the swagger in his performance here that he has had at every other moment in his career while drummer Charlie Watts’ time keeping is just as solid as ever.  Guitarists Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood show throughout the course of the show that, like Jagger, they can still hold their own easily against their younger counterparts, working through every single riff and every single song with ease.  At the same time, the pair’s smiles and swagger as they make their way across the stage from song to song exude their own share of energy on which audiences will feed. Touring bassist Darryl Jones, who according to the recording’s notes joined the band for the first time in the Voodoo Lounge tour, adds his own interest as he shares some light-hearted moments with his fellow musicians as do touring vocalists Lisa Fischer and Bernard Fowler.  Horn players Kent Smith, Bobby Keys, Andy Snitzer and Michael Davis join with keyboardist Chuck Leavell to give each song even more energy thanks to the energy that they put into each performance.  Between their performances and those of the rest of the group, the whole of the musicians’ performances proves just as entertaining as any other performance that The Rolling Stones has presented to audiences in its previous live recordings because of the energy and effort put into entertaining the group’s audiences.  When the collective’s performance is considered along with the set recording’s featured set list the two related items come together to give audiences quite a bit to appreciate in this set.  They are only a portion of what makes Voodoo Lounge Uncut so enjoyable, too.  The concert’s production is just as important to examine as the show’s set and the band’s performance thereof.

The production involved with this recording is important to examine because of its general effect for home viewers.  It is noted in the recording’s companion booklet that this recording was originally presented on pay-per-view in its very first presentation almost 25 years ago.  Taking in the recording here, the production is impressive.  Given there are some shots that are perhaps a little too short, leading to some feelings of dizziness.  Those shots are not enough to make the concert unwatchable, though.  The aerial shots at the concert’s end and the overhead shots from the crane cams give viewers a full sense of just how many people attended the concert.  The various angles from the stage and the crowd do just as much to keep audiences engaged and entertained as they make audiences feel as if they are right there with the rest of the audience.  At times, those behind the cameras even take viewers into the crowd, giving audiences a glimpse into what the audience saw and heard.  On yet another level, the timing of many of the shots even timed almost perfectly with the songs themselves, adding even more impact to each performance, and in turn ensuring even more, audiences’ engagement and entertainment.  Adding even more interest is the attention given to the concert’s audio mix.  The Joe Robbie stadium is a massively open venue, as any National Football League fan knows.  That means that a lot of work had to have been done and time taken to balance every single line.  That work and attention clearly paid off, as did the work and time put in by those who edited down the concert for its presentation here.  No one line overpowers that other at any point throughout the show.  Kudos are in order for all involved, considering this.  This positive joins with the positives in the show’s set and the band’s performance to strengthen the recording’s presentation even more.  It is still not the last of the recording’s most important elements.  The companion booklet, which has previously been noted rounds out the set’s most important items.

The recording’s companion booklet is important in part because of its liner notes.  Composed by Paul Sexton, the liner notes point out that the Voodoo Lounge tour marked the first time that Darryl Jones joined The Rolling Stones as the band’s bassist.  This is important to note because as previously noted, this concert took place almost 25 years ago.  That is a long time for him to have been with the band.  Sexton’s liner notes also point out Jagger’s interest in artist Santiago Calatrava played a part in the look of the set for the band’s show.  As if these notes are not enough, Sexton also highlights thoughts from Sheryl Crow, who joins the band on-stage for one of the show’s three guest appearances.  He quotes Crow as saying how frightened she was to perform with the band because of her respect for the band.  There is even mention of Richard’s time in the limelight and much more.  Between all of that extra and the items noted here, Sexton’s liner notes give audiences a solid, clear introduction to this concert, setting the scene for the performance quite well.  It offers its own enlightenment and entertainment for audiences.  When this positive is considered along with the positives exhibited in the recording’s set list, the band’s performance thereof and the recording’s production, the whole of the recording proves to be yet another standout live offering from The Rolling Stones and Eagle Rock Entertainment.  It continues that positive tradition that was started so long ago from the two sides, ensuring once again that audiences and Rolling Stones fans alike will have plenty to appreciate from beginning to end.

Eagle Rock Entertainment and The Rolling Stones’ latest live recording Voodoo Lounge Uncut is another successful live offering from the two sides in what is a long-running partnership between the two groups.  It is an offering that fans of The Rolling Stones will enjoy just as much as rock fans in general.  This is proven in part through the recording’s extensive 27-song (technically 32-song) set that lifts from a healthy section of the band’s catalog.  The band’s performance of said set list builds on the foundation formed via that list as does the show’s production.  The companion booklet that comes with the recording puts the finishing touch to its presentation, cementing its positive presentation.  Each element is important in its own way to the whole of Voodoo Lounge Uncut.  All things considered, they make this recording yet another wonderful addition to the collection of any Rolling Stones fan.  More information on Voodoo Lounge Uncut is available online now along with all of the Rolling Stones’ latest news and more at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.rollingstones.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/therollingstones

Twitter: http://twitter.com/RollingStones

 

 

 

More information on this and other titles from Eagle Rock Entertainment is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.eagle-rock.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/EagleRockEnt

Twitter: http://twitter.com/EagleRockNews

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

‘Havana Moon’ Is A Shining Beacon In The Rolling Stones’ Extensive Live Catalogue

Courtesy: Eagle Rock Entertainment

Courtesy: Eagle Rock Entertainment

The Rolling Stones have held countless concerts in nearly every corner of the world over the course of its nearly 55-year life.  From the UK to Asia and across the Americas, the British rock outfit has been there and done that plenty of times. For all of the concerts that the band has held throughout its life, few have held or hold the importance of the concert that the band held on March 25, 2016.  It was on that night that The Rolling Stones became the first rock band in the country’s history to play a free concert in Havana.  The concert came only days after President Barack Obama became the first American President in 88 years to pay a visit to the island nation.  It was one of the most momentous occasions in the band’s history, and this Friday audiences around the world will be able to see the concert for themselves when Havana Moon is released in stores and online.  The concert boasts plenty of positives, beginning with its set list.  That will be discussed shortly.  The band’s performance of its set list is just as important to note as the songs in examining the recording’s overall presentation.  It will be discussed later.  The concert’s companion booklet rounds out its most important elements.  Each element is important in its own right to the concert’s presentation.  All things considered, they make Havana Moon a shining beacon in The Rolling Stones’ extensive live catalogue.

Havana Moon, The Rolling Stones’ new live recording, is a shining beacon in the band’s extensive live catalogue.  It is a landmark concert because there is no telling if the band will ever perform on the island nation again.  It boasts plenty of positives, beginning with the show’s set list.  The show’s 18-song set list features a favorable sampling of the band’s most beloved songs including ‘Honky Tonk Women,’ ‘Paint It Black,’ ‘Brown Sugar’ and so many others.  There are also some lesser known pieces included in the set list such as ‘Angie,’ ‘You Got The Silver’ and ‘Out Of Control.’  Audiences that pick up this record will find the show’s musical mix relatively familiar due to that set list.  While the set list may not necessarily break any new ground for the band, it was new ground for the audiences in attendance.  Their appreciation for hearing the classic compositions shows throughout the concert.  That appreciation by the audiences will make audiences more familiar with the set list that much more appreciative of the set list even despite already knowing said song.  The familiar set list and the audience’s appreciation of said set list do plenty to make Havana Moon an enjoyable recording.  The band’s performance of each song is just as important to note here as the songs themselves.

The songs that make up the body of Havana Moon are important in their own right to the recording’s presentation.  That is because while the songs are familiar to most audiences, they clearly were not so familiar to the Stones’ Cuban audience.  The audience’s appreciation for the songs will generate a whole new appreciation for the songs among audiences who are more familiar with the songs.  That is because seeing their reaction allows more seasoned audiences to experience the songs in a whole new light.  While the songs and the audience’s appreciation thereof are clearly important to the recording’s presentation, they are not, collectively, the only important pieces of the recording’s presentation.  The band’s performance of the show’s set list is just as important to note as the set list itself.  That is because many of the renditions presented in this concert are unlike any that the band has done before.  The band’s take of ‘Pained Black’ is just one of those unexpected performances.  Most people know this song as being a rather powerful composition thanks to drummer Charlie Watts’ work at the base of the song.  Keith Richards’ guitar line sits atop Watts’ timekeeping and solidifies the song’s instrumentation even more. The band’s performance of the song in Havana is anything but what one would expect of the song.  The band’s performance of the song here is much more reserved than in its normal presentation.  If the band has ever performed the song in the style presented here, then said instances are very rare.  That makes this performance all the more important.  The band’s rendition of ‘Honkey Tonk Women’ stands out just as much here as that of ‘Painted Black.’  It is a little bit slower than the band’s normal renditions, but not by too much; just enough to make it noticeable without taking anything away from the song in this case.  Of course one cannot ignore the extended take of ‘Midnight Rambler’ here.  The band’s performance feels so organic even as it runs more than 15 minutes.  It is one more example of how the band’s performance stands out in this recording just as much as the songs chosen for the concert.  There are plenty of other performances throughout the show that stand as examples of what makes the band’s overall performance just as important to the recording’s presentation as the songs themselves.  All in all, they join with the performances noted here to show in whole why the band’s performance of its set list is just as important to the recording’s presentation as the show’s set list.  It still is not the last important element to discuss.  The recording’s companion booklet is just as important to note in its presentation as the show’s set list and the band’s performance thereof.

The set list that is featured in Havana Moon and the band’s performance thereof are both important in their own right to the recording’s overall presentation.  Audiences who are familiar with the featured songs will gain a whole new appreciation for them as they see the Cuban audience—many of whom were experiencing the songs for the first time ever—show their own appreciation for getting to hear them.  The band’s performance is just as important to note here because in many cases, the band’s performances of certain songs are completely unlike those in any other live setting.  They give said songs brand new identities.  Both elements are clearly important in their own right.  Yet they are not the recording’s only important elements.  The recording’s companion booklet is just as important to note in examining the recording’s overall presentation as the show’s set list and the band’s performance.  That is because it presents a rich background picture of the concert courtesy of Jonathan Watts.  Watts starts the concert’s story with a mention of President Obama making his own historic visit to Cuba only days before The Rolling Stones.  From there, he highlights all of the work that went in to making the “Concert For Amity” a reality.  It then transitions into the story of the concert.  That story includes the reaction of both the band and the audience to one another.  By the time Watts reaches the story’s end, the importance of the concert becomes crystal clear.  He shows through his story why this concert is an important part of not only The Rolling Stones’ history but also of Cuba’s history and that of the entire world.  That understanding creates even more appreciation for the concert, and in turn, leaves audiences understanding that this is truly a special recording that Rolling Stones fans and music lovers alike should have in their music libraries.

Havana Moon is an important piece of Cuba’s history.  It is also an important part of The Rolling Stones’ history and that of the whole world.  The band isn’t the first-ever band to perform in Cuba.  But it is the first band to hold a free concert in the island nation’s capital.  From its set list to the band’s performance to the recording’s companion booklet, there is so much included here that serves to illustrate the importance of the concert.  One could also cite the recording’s editing, varied platforms on which it is available and much more to show why it is such an important performance.  All things considered, Havana Moon shows itself in the end to be a recording that Rolling Stones fans and music lovers alike should have in his or her own music library.  Havana Moon will be available Friday, November 11th in stores and online.  More information on Havana Moon is available online along with all of The Rolling Stones’ latest news and more at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.rollingstones.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/therollingstones

Twitter: http://twitter.com/RollingStones

 

 

 

More information on this and other titles from Eagle Rock Entertainment is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.eagle-rock.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/EagleRockEnt

Twitter: http://twitter.com/EagleRockNews

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Live In Leeds Is One More Welcome Addition To The Rolling Stones’ “From The Vault” Series

Courtesy:  Eagle Rock Entertainment/Universal Music Group

Courtesy: Eagle Rock Entertainment/Universal Music Group

Late last year, Eagle Rock Entertainment teamed up with Universal Music Group and The Rolling Stones and dove into the band’s extensive “Vault” of recordings to release the band’s 1981 performance at the Hampton Coliseum in Hampton, Virginia. The concert was just one of a number of dates in the band’s worldwide tour in support of its then latest album Tattoo You. Now a little more than a year since that recording’s release Eagle Rock, UMG, and The Rolling Stones have partnered once again to bring audiences another performance from that tour in the form of From The Vault: Live in Leeds 1982. The concert, which was originally recorded on July 25th, 1982, was the final show for the European leg of its Tattoo You tour. Being part of said tour, the most important element of this recording is the concert’s set list. It is a near mirror image of last year’s Hampton Coliseum recording. This might not seem important at first glance. but the reality is that it is far more important than many might think. This will be discussed at more length shortly. The band’s stage presence throughout the performance is just as important in the concert’s overall presentation as its set list. That will be discussed in more depth later. Last but hardly least of note in this presentation is the recording’s collective production values. This includes the values of the DVD and CD portion. All three elements play their own important part in the overall presentation of this recording. Of course as important as they are one would be remiss to ignore the recording’s companion booklet. Even that aspect plays its own important part in the whole of the recording as does the recording’s DVD/2 CD packaging. All things considered, From The Vault: Live in Leeds 1982 is one more welcome addition to The Rolling Stones continuing “From The Vault” series.

From The Vault: Live in Leeds 1982 is yet another welcome addition to The Rolling Stones’ “From The Vault” series of concert recordings. Originally recorded on July 25th, 1982 at Roundhay Park in Leeds, England, this recording is a “sister” show to the band’s 1981 show at the Hampton Coliseum in Hampton, Virginia. That recording was released late last year as another part of the band’s “From The Vault” series. Considering the relationship between the two recordings, the most important aspect of the band’s tour finale in Leeds is its set list. The set list is a near mirror image of that presented in the band’s 1981 show at the Hampton Coliseum. It differs by only one song–‘Let It Bleed.’ That song was included in the Hampton Coliseum show but omitted in the Leeds performance. What’s more save for that one omission, the rest of the show’s set list is exactly the same as that in the Hampton Coliseum show. This might not seem all that important to the whole of the recording. But in reality it is extremely important. It is so important because not every Rolling Stones fan might have been lucky enough to pick up the band’s Hampton Coliseum show in its original release last year. This means that said fans now have been given a second chance to experience the same show (for the most part) right down to the set list’s order. And for those that might already own the band’s Hampton Coliseum show, that one minor difference (and of course the birthday wishes to guitarist Keith Richards) makes this recording just as enjoyable as its predecessor. Keeping all of this in mind, the set list presented in the band’s tour finale proves to be just as important to the concert as any of its other elements. Speaking of those other elements, the band’s stage presence throughout the course of the concert is another of those important elements.

The set list presented in the body of the band’s Tattoo You World Tour is a hugely important part of the recording’s overall presentation. It gives audiences the same show as its 1981 concert at the Hampton Coliseum in Hampton, Virginia. The whole reason for that importance has already been noted. In the same vein the band’s stage presence over the course of its two hour-plus concert is just as important to note as the show’s set list. For the most part, the band gives its whole for its audiences from start to finish. Front man Mick Jagger is just as energetic as ever, strutting around the massive stage, keeping the audience worked up and entertained. Guitarists Keith Richards and Ron Wood are just as entertaining to watch as they work their way through each song alongside drummer Charlie Watts. Speaking of Watts, as impressive and enjoyable as his performance was throughout, there was one down moment for him when the band broke into ‘Black Limousine.’ While Wood and Richards swung their way through the bluesy tune, Watts never really seemed to swing with them. He kept time, yes. However he just kept a solid tempo instead of swinging with them. Whether or not he realized he was doing that is anyone’s guess. But it definitely takes away from the song. Luckily it is Watts’ only down side. Bassist Bill Wyman sadly seems just as disinterested as ever in this concert save (go figure) for when the band hits ‘Black Limousine.’ The rest of the time, he barely cracks a smile or even moves around. Of course it is known that in the seven years that followed, things apparently turned sour within the band in its time away from the road. One can’t help but wonder if things had been turning bad at least for Wyman during the course of this tour. After all, when the band returned to the road in 1989 it would be the beginning of the end for Wyman in his time with the band. It’s anyone’s guess. Getting back on topic, the band kept the audience entertained from beginning to end for the most part. This includes the band’s backing musicians–Ian Stewart (piano), Chuck Leavell (keyboards, backing vocals), Gene Barge (saxophone), and Bobby Keys (saxophone)–too. Altogether, the collective performers and their energy make every one of the concert’s twenty-five total songs just as enjoyable for audiences today as they did for those in attendance at the original performance.

The set list and stage presence of the band throughout the course of said set list does plenty to make From The Vault: Live in Leeds 1982 another welcome addition to The Rolling Stones’ “From The Vault” series. Of course as important as both elements are to the whole of the concert’s presentation they are just part of what makes the concert’s overall presentation worth the watch. The concert’s collective production values are just as important as the set list and the band’s stage presence if not more so. The overall production values presented in this recording are impressive in their own right. Of course the inclusion of the concert’s video recording alongside its audio portion plays directly into that. That is because it allows audiences to see the massive size of the venue. It was a rather large outdoor venue. And that posed its own share of challenges both for the concert’s audio engineers and the camera crews. It allowed the sound to spread out everywhere meaning that the engineers had to really work the levels and keep them balanced throughout the concert. They did just that. And while it shows in the concert’s CD portion, it is even clearer in the presentation’s DVD. The venue’s immense size is just as important to note for the concert’s camera crews. That is because of the options and challenges alike that it posed for those individuals. The challenges were raised by the number of concertgoers at the venue. It meant having to work through them in order to capture the concert both in terms of its size and in terms of the band’s performance. The wipes that are used to transition from one angle to another at times show how far such technology has come yet how little it has changed at the same time. The cuts are just as clean as the director went from camera to camera, trying to keep up with Jagger and capture the audience’s energy at the same time. Between those shots and the shots that capture the band’s overall performance the overall camerawork presented throughout the band’s performance here, the concert’s video mix proves just as impressive as the work of those behind the boards. Those that re-mastered the concert for its presentation in this recording are just as much to applaud for their efforts. And together with the show’s set list and the band ‘s presence throughout said list Live in Leeds proves in whole to be one more welcome addition to The Rolling Stones’ “From The Vault” series.

There is a lot that can be said of the latest addition to The Rolling Stones’ “From The Vault” series. The show’s set list complements that of the band’s 1981 concert in Hampton, Virginia since both shows were part of the same overall tour. The band’s stage presence throughout the concert is just as impressive in any of its other performances past and present. This includes the performance of the band’s backing musicians. The overall production values presented in this concert as to be applauded both for the efforts of those that originally recorded the concert and those that re-mastered it for its recent release via Eagle Rock Entertainment and Universal Music Group. As important as those noted elements prove to be to the whole of the recording, they still aren’t the presentation’s only noteworthy elements. One would be remiss to ignore the recording’s companion booklet or the very presentation of the recording on DVD/2 CD combo pack. The companion booklet offers yet another rich history on the concert and its importance. The overall presentation gives audiences the complete concert experience here without forcing them to have to choose between platforms. That is nothing new for Eagle Rock’s live recordings either, thus showing once more why Eagle Rock Entertainment remains today the leading name in live recordings. That full concert experience coupled with the rich history in the recording’s companion booklet round out the recording once and for all, showing in whole why this recording is one more welcome addition to the band’s “From The Vault” series as well as any Rolling Stones fan’s music library. From The Vault: Live in Leeds 1982 is available now in stores and online. More information on this and other titles from Eagle Rock Entertainment is available online now at:

Website: http://www.eagle-rock.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/EagleRockEnt

Twitter: http://twitter.com/EagleRockNews

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Every Rolling Stones Fan Should Own Live At The Tokyo Dome

Courtesy:  Eagle Rock Entertainment/Universal Music Group

Courtesy: Eagle Rock Entertainment/Universal Music Group

The Rolling Stones is the greatest rock band in the world. Period. That might be something of a subjective statement from this critic. But it is this critic’s own view. The band has spent the better part of half a century and then some proving its greatness. It has done so through the release of nearly thirty albums, at least thirteen live albums, and countless live performances throughout its life. One of those live recordings–Live at The Tokyo Dome–was released late last month as part of the band’s “From The Vault” series of recordings. This recording is one of the most important in the band’s extensive catalogue of live recordings. The main reason for this is the span of time that had passed between this show and the band’s most recent tour at the time, which had ended in Leeds in 1982. That is a span of seven years. While the band’s show at the Tokyo Dome wasn’t the lead off for the band’s Steel Wheels Tour, it still remains an important piece of the band’s history considering that span of time. Staying in that pattern of thought, the band’s stage presence throughout the course of the roughly two-hour performance lies at the center of the recording. That will be discussed shortly. In the same vein, the show’s featured set list is just as important to the presented concert as the band’s performance. Audiences will be interested to learn that of the concert’s twenty-four song set, the majority of its songs were lifted from the band’s older, more familiar albums than the band’s then latest album Steel Wheels. That will be discussed later as it plays its own important role in the whole of this recording. Last but hardly least of note in Live at The Tokyo Dome’s overall presentation is the presentation’s collective production values. The concert’s audio mix is surprisingly impressive. The video portion is just as interesting. That is because it shows just how far video recording technology has come since the concert’s recording. It is one more reason that this concert recording proves to be so important to the band’s history. Together with the band’s performance and its featured set list, the concert in whole shows in the end to be yet another great addition to The Rolling Stones’ “From The Vault” series.

The latest addition to The Rolling Stones’ “From The Vault” series, Live at The Tokyo Dome is one of the most important pieces of the band’s history to be released in recent history. That is because the concert presented here is part of a tour (The “Steel Wheels Tour”) that was the first for the band in seven years at the time. Before the band embarked on the “Steel Wheels Tour” in August 1989, its members had not been out on the road together since having performed in Leeds in 1982. That concert will be released by Eagle Rock Entertainment later this month. Now having noted this, the band’s stage presence in its Valentines Day 1990 concert is the concert’s most important element to note. Core members Mick Jagger and Keith Richards performed like they had never been away from the road. Mick strutted and danced all over the stage from start to finish, giving his all. Just as interesting (if not more so) to note of Jagger’s performance is his interaction with the audience. He spent a fair share of time talking to the audience and even going out into the audience at one point in the show. That’s just one part of what makes his interaction with the audience so intriguing. Most intriguing is that he seemed to speak to the audience in Japanese in more than just a couple of sentences. He really came across as being fluent in the language considering just how much he spoke in the audience’s home language. This is key to note because of just how many performers are trained in just a couple of phrases here in there for their respective foreign audiences even today. Jagger didn’t go that route. He really came across as being quite familiar with the language. It’s refreshing to hear. Moving on, lead guitarist Keith Richards was just as entertaining both as the band’s lead guitarist and in his time on the mic. That’s right. Richards even got his own time on the mic as he had written a pair of songs–‘Can’t Be Seen’ and ‘Happy’–for Steel Wheels. By comparison, bassist Bill Wyman showed nearly no emotion at all throughout the evening’s performance. Of course after the tour wrapped up later that year in Europe, Wyman and the band parted ways. Considering the well publicized issues among the band during its time away from the road prior to the “Steel Wheels Tour,” one becomes less surprised by Wyman’s apparent lack of interest and energy throughout the show. By comparison drummer Charlie Watts looked right at home behind the drum kit from beginning to end. He played his part like it was old hat yet still presented an air of truly enjoying being on stage again. One could also go into the performance provided by the band’s backup singers and musicians. But it goes without saying that their energy was just as positive, leading in turn to a show that audiences watching the show at home today will enjoy just as much as those audiences that were in attendance at the original performance. That is because the band in whole (including the backup performers) performed here as if it had never been away from the road. It’s just one part of the concert’s presentation that makes the recording so enjoyable. The show’s set list is just as important to the recording as the band’s performance.

The Rolling Stones’ stage presence (and that of the band’s backing performers) is central to the overall presentation of Live at The Tokyo Dome. It showed a group of performers that had obviously not lost a step in all of its years off the road and despite its own internal issues. While the musicians’ stage presence is important to the recording’s presentation in its own right, it is only one part of the presentation that should be noted. The show’s featured set list is just as important to the whole of the concert as the band’s stage presence. This is especially the case considering that while the band was touring in support of its then new album Steel Wheels, only five of the show’s twenty-four songs were pulled from that album. The other nineteen songs were older, more familiar tunes. It reaches all the way back to the band’s 1967 album Their Satanic Majesties Request. That album is represented through the song ‘2000 Light Years From Home.’ Beggar’s Banquet, Let It Bleed, Sticky Fingers (which was just recently re-issued), Exile on Main Street, It’s Only Rock ‘N Roll, Tattoo You, and Dirty Work are all represented in the show’s set list. The U.S. release of Between The Buttons is represented, too thanks to the inclusion of ‘Ruby Tuesday.’ Simply put the band included songs from a pretty wide swath of its catalogue up to that point in this show’s set list. This is important to note be cause it shows the band had taken into direct consideration the fact that so much time had passed since it had last toured. So those older songs were likely what audiences really wanted to hear since it’s what those audiences knew. It shows a deep respect for the audience. Considering this, it had to have made audiences respect the band even more in turn. That mutual respect between the band and audience ultimately makes the concert’s set list that much more important of an element in the whole of Live at The Tokyo Dome. And together with the band’s stage presence throughout each song, the two elements together show even more why Live at The Tokyo Dome such an important piece of The Rolling Stones’ history.

The Rolling Stones’ stage presence in Live at The Tokyo Dome and the concert’s set list are both of equal importance to the concert’s overall presentation. While both elements are important in their own right to the whole of this recording, they would be of no consequence without mention of the recording’s collective production values, or its audio and video. Audiences must go into this recording understanding that the concert was recorded in 1990. That was well before the advent of high-definition capabilities. That being the case, the audio mix at least proves to be relatively impressive. That is especially considering the size of the Tokyo Dome. Audiences will note in watching the performance just how open the concert hall is inside. It has very high ceilings and is just as open from wall to wall. That means an increased ability of the sound to echo throughout the hall. Luckily, all involved both at the concert and in preparing this recording handled their duties with the utmost precision. The result is a concert that sounds just as good on Blu-ray (and CD) as it did in the original performance if not better. The video quality is just as interesting. While some of the shots are clear others are at the opposite end of that spectrum. More specifically, there are some shots that are not quite in focus despite the best efforts of those behind the cameras. But they are luckily not enough to really ruin the concert’s overall viewing experience. If anything the combination of those shots and the concert’s re-mastered audio serves to show just how far recording technology has come since this concert was recorded. In its own way it actually makes the overall experience of this concert that much more enjoyable. Because it does, it makes the band’s performance that much more engaging and the show’s set list just as impressive. All things considered, Live at The Tokyo Dome shows in the end to be another welcome addition to The Rolling Stones’ ongoing “From The Vault” series.

The Rolling Stones’ Live at The Tokyo Dome is yet another welcome addition to the band’s ongoing “From The Vault” series. The band’s stage presence exhibits a band in general that had not lost a step despite having been off the road for roughly seven years before it embarked on its “Steel Wheels Tour.” The set list shows a certain amount of respect for fans considering that most of the show’s twenty-four-song set list was pulled from the band’s already extensive catalogue of albums at the time. And the recording’s overall production values show just how far recording technology has come since the concert’s original presentation even as impressive as those values are in their own right. One would be remiss to ignore the recording’s companion booklet and double gatefold packaging. The companion booklet adds even more enjoyment to the overall experience as it presents extra tidbits such as the revelation that the band’s stage setup was so big that it took eighty (yes, eighty) trucks to haul it from venue to venue. The crew required to assemble and break down the set was just as expansive, according to Richard Havers’ notes. It’s tough to figure out conversion rates, but the revelation of tickets to the Tokyo Dome show costing 10,000 Yen is just as eye-opening. These are just a couple of interesting extras that are noted in the companion booklet. And while it might be more bulky than the standard multi-disc setup, the double gatefold packaging of the SD Blu-ray/2-CD combo pack actually protects the discs more than that standard slim packaging. Whether for that packaging, the bonuses added by the companion booklet or for any of the centrally noted elements, it can be said of Live at The Tokyo Dome that the recording in whole is, again, one of the most important pieces of the band’s history and one that any Rolling Stones fan will want to have in his or her own music (and Rolling Stones) library. It is available now in stores and online. More information on this and other titles from Eagle Rock Entertainment is available online now at:

Website: http://www.eagle-rock.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/EagleRockEnt

Twitter: http://twitter.com/EagleRockNews

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ABKCO Records To Re-Issue Classic Rolling Stones Song This Summer

Courtesy:  ABKCO Records

Courtesy: ABKCO Records

Today, May 12th, is an important date in the modern history of music.

Fifty years ago today, Mick Jagger and his band mates in The Rolling Stones first recorded the band’s hit single ‘(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction.’ While not the band’s first ever single, it was the first of the band’s singles to go #1 in the United States when it made its debut in June of 1965. In celebration of the anniversary ABKCO Records announced Monday that it will release a special edition of the single on vinyl this summer.

ABKCO Records announced Monday that it will release ‘(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction’ as a special 12” limited edition vinyl single on Friday, July 10th on 180-gram vinyl. The A-side will feature the final single known to all audiences. Fans on both sides of the Atlantic will be happy to know that this special edition re-issue will also feature as its B-sides the songs ‘The Under Assistant West Coast Promotion Man’ and ‘The Spider and the Fly.’ The songs in question were its original U.S. and U.K. B-sides respectively. Their appearance here marks the first time ever that they have been presented together on one record. Audiences that might not be so familiar with either single will be interested to learn of the prior of the two singles that its history is rooted in the band’s experience with London Records employee George Sherlock. As the story goes, the band wasn’t entirely enamored with Sherlock. The band allegedly saw him as someone that was just another music industry yes man decked out in a seersucker suit and toupee. The song indirectly makes him the target lyrically as it makes commentary about music industry insiders unnecessarily involving themselves in the creation of bands’ songs. It was loosely based on Buster Brown’s hit single ‘Fannie Mae.’ It wasn’t used in the UK as record executives with DECCA felt that British audiences wouldn’t get the numerous American references throughout the song. That led to Decca opting for ‘The Spider and the Fly’ being used as the B-side for ‘(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction’ in the UK.

The single’s cover features a picture of the band taken by award-winning photographer David Bailey. It is the same cover art used in the original single’s release. Carl Rowatti re-mastered the single at Trutone Mastering Labs from the song’s original mono tapes for its upcoming 45 rpm 12-inch release.

‘(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction’ was originally released as a single by London Records in the U.S. on June 6th, 1965. It reached the #1 spot on Record World’s charts not long after on July 3rd. By July 10th, the single had hit the top spot at Billboard and Cashbox pushing The Byrds’ ‘Mr. Tambourine Man’ and The Four Tops’ ‘I Can’t Help Myself.’ It held the top spot on Record World’s Charts and for four at Billboard and Cashbox respectively. By July 19th of that year, it had gone on to become the band’s first ever single to be certified gold by the RIAA. It would go on to be released August 20th in the UK on DECCA Records and would become the band’s fourth #1 single overseas.

Many audiences might find interesting that both the song’s title and main guitar line were developed by guitarist Keith Richards. And the song that audiences have come to love to this day is not the song’s original take. The original take of the song was recorded at Chess in Chicago on May 10th, 1965 before being tossed. The take that went on to become the final product was recorded at RCA Studios in Hollywood, CA on May 12th. Even more interesting to note of the song is that Richards’ guitar line was originally going to be performed by a horn section instead of guitar. However producer/manager Andrew Loog Oldham and engineer David Hassinger opted for Richards’ guitar instead, leading to the now famed line that audiences know today as one of the most famous in music history. Despite popular belief, the song’s lyrical content does not only make reference to sexual frustration but to a dislike for all of the consumerist messages out there. The icing on the cake of the song’s story is that only two people were against publishing the single—Mick Jagger and Keith Richards.

The upcoming re-issue of ‘(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction’ will be pressed in a limited quantity of 10,000 numbered copies in North America and will be released fifty years to the day that the song was originally released. It can be pre-ordered now via Amazon at http://www.amazon.com/Satisfaction-Anniversary-Single-Limited-Numbered/dp/B00W34SFGM/?tag=httpwwwabkcoc-20. More information on this and other releases from ABKCO Records is available online at:

Website: http://www.abkco.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/abkco

Twitter: http://twitter.com/abkco

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Rolling Stones’ “Clearly Classic” Vinyls Are Among 2014’s Best Re-Issues

Courtesy:  ABKCO

Courtesy: ABKCO

Early this Spring, ABKCO re-issued to audiences around the world three more of The Rolling Stones’ most beloved albums.  The albums in question are: Get Yer Ya-Yas Out: The Rolling Stones in Concert, 12 X 5, and the band’s hits collection Through The Past, Darkly (Big Hits Vol. 2).  All three titles were re-issued as part of ABKCO’s ongoing “Clearly Classic” series.  And for audiences that prefer the vintage sound of vinyl to the more spit-shined sound of music on a CD or an MP3, these three latest re-issues are the perfect fit.  That sound is only part of what audiences will appreciate in these latest re-issues.  That they have been re-issued with their original artwork makes each vinyl even more enjoyable for fans of The Rolling Stones.  Last but definitely not least of all, each of these re-issues can be purchased by themselves or collectively depending on whether or not one already owns the original vinyls.  All three factors together make these vinyls the year’s top three music re-issues of 2014.

The central point in the enjoyment of ABKCO’s recently re-issued Rolling Stones titles is of course its sound. And it goes without saying that the sound on these re-issues could not be better. The sound is just as wonderful as it was in the vinyls’ original releases.  Only in the case of these “Clearly Classic” re-issues, it actually sounds even better as if it was on CD.  It sounds especially impressive on the band’s live release Get Yer Ya-Yas Out: The Rolling Stones in Concert.  Considering how many years ago that concert was originally recorded, it’s incredible that it sounds as good today as it did then.  Those charged with re-mastering the sound on that concert recording or this new re-issue are to be applauded for their efforts.  Much the same can be said of the sound on both 12 X 5 and Through The Past, Darkly (Big Hits Vol. 2).  In the case of the songs on the latter of that pair, they have been added to nearly every one of the Stones’ many hits collections released over the years.  So it’s nice to hear them in one of their earlier hits collections.  There’s just a different quality that can’t be fully put into words.  It is something that must be heard first hand to be fully appreciated.

Audiences will appreciate the sound of the songs on these three latest Rolling Stones re-issues.  The sound on all three vinyls is just as impressive as that of the songs in their CD re-issues. Audiences will also appreciate in these re-issues the fact that they have been presented with their original artwork. There are so many labels out there today that try to revamp albums all the way down to their cover art as a means to market the albums. ABKCO didn’t take that route with these re-issues. It proves once more just how much the company wanted to honor both the historical significance of the albums and the band itself. Even more, it also shows a certain level of respect for the audiences, too. Older audiences will appreciate this as it will add to the sense of nostalgia established through the albums’ re-issues. Younger audiences that might be hearing these releases for the first time will appreciate them more for their historical significance. A comparison of such artwork to that of so many of today’s albums shows a vast stylistic difference. Unlike so many of today’s releases, there is nothing sexy or controversial about these releases’ artwork. That means that the attention will largely be on the music. The end result is a deeper appreciation for music that is plain and simple, real.

The transfer of the Rolling Stones’ original albums from CD back to vinyl on these re-issues is impressive to say the least. The sound quality is just as wonderful as ever. The use of the releases’ original artwork makes the overall listening experience even more enjoyable whether one is new to the world of The Rolling Stones or a far more seasoned fan. There is still one last aspect of these re-issues worth noting in their success. That final aspect in the success of these albums is the ease of purchasing them. They can each be purchased now via Amazon. And all three albums are below the thirty-dollar mark. So they are also affordable for audiences. Considering that many markets lack an indie store where fans could potentially pick up these vinyl re-issues, this ease of ordering becomes an even more important aspect to their overall enjoyment and success. Get Yer YaYas Out can be ordered directly via Amazon at http://smarturl.it/YaYasLP, while 12 X 5 and Through The Past, Darkly (Big Hits Vol. 2) can be ordered at http://smarturl.it/12x5LP and http://smarturl.it/TTPDVinyl respectively. That cost effectiveness and ease of ordering along with the releases’ artwork and quality sound transfer back to vinyl each partners together in the overall presentation of these releases to make them absolute must haves for any true-blooded Rolling Stones fan. It also makes them three of this year’s top new re-issues.

More information on The Rolling Stones is available online at http://www.facebook.com/therollingstones,http://www.rollingstones.com and http://twitter.com/rollingstones.To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

ABKCO Announces New Trio Of “Clearly Classic” Re-Issues

Courtesy:  ABKCO

Courtesy: ABKCO

ABKCO has announced that it will release three more classic Rolling Stones records to its “Clearly Classic” vinyl series this year.

ABKCO’s “Clearly Classic” started in 2013.It has added to that series of releases Get Yer Ya-Yas Out!: The Rolling Stones in Concert, 12X5, and Through The Past, Darkly (Big Hits Volume 2).The new re-issues join ABKCO’s previously released Rolling Stones “Clearly Classic” re-issues Beggars Banquet, Let it Bleed, and Hot Rocks:1964 1971.
 
Get Yer Ya-Yas Out!The Rolling Stones in Concert has the honor of being the first live album by any artist to have reached #1 on the UK charts.The concert on this re-issue was recorded at New York’s Madison Square Garden over the course of November 27thand 28th, 1969 and was the first to feature guitarist Mick Taylor.It is considered the best of the Rolling Stones’ live releases to date.The most notable performance on this recording is the band’s nine-plus minute rendition of ‘Midnight Rambler.’This record can be pre-ordered now online at http://smarturl.it/YaYasLP.
 
12X5 was the Stones’ second full length U.S. release.This album, released in October 1964, combines the band’s EP Five By Five and its singles ‘It’s All Over Now’ and ‘Time Is On My Side’ as well as their B-sides.The record also features three more tracks that would go on to be included in the Stones’second UK full length album The Rolling Stones No. 2.The upcoming “Clearly Classic” re-issue of this album is based on the original mono mix of the album.It can be pre-ordered now online at http://smarturl.it/12x5LP.
 
Through The Past, Darkly (Big Hits Volume 2) is the second of The Rolling Stones’ compilation albums.It was originally released in September 1969.The first of the Stones’compilations was titled Big Hits (High Tide and Green Grass).Through The Past, Darkly (Big Hits Volume 2) reached #2 both in the U.S. and UK upon its original release.It includes a number of the Rolling Stones’greatest and most beloved songs including: ‘Jumpin’ Jack Flash’,Let’s Spend the Night Together’ and ‘Honky Tonk Woman.’Fans will appreciate that even in its re-issue, ABKCO has maintained the original album’s octagonal packaging.Inside the packaging, audiences will find a poem penned by Brian Jones who would pass away only two months before the original release of this album.Jones’ poem is below.This re-issue can be pre-ordered now online at http://smarturl.it/TTPDVinyl.
When this you see, remember me,
and bear me in your mind.
Let all the world say what they may,
speak of me as you find.
 
The track listing for each of the three upcoming “Clearly Classic” Rolling Stones re-issues is listed below.
 
Track Listings:
Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out! The Rolling Stones in Concert
Side 1
Jumpin’ Jack Flash
Carol
Stray Cat Blues
Love in Vain
Midnight Rambler
Side 2
Sympathy For the Devil
Live With Me
Little Queenie
Honky Tonk Women
Street Fighting Man
12 X 5
Side 1
Around and Around
Confessin’ the Blues
Empty Heart
Time Is on My Side
Good Times, Bad Times
It’s All Over Now
Side 2
2120 South Michigan Avenue
Under the Boardwalk
Congratulations
Grown Up Wrong
If You Need Me
Susie Q
Through the Past, Darkly (Big Hits Vol. 2)
Side 1
Ruby Tuesday
She’s A Rainbow
Jumpin’ Jack Flash
Mother’s Little Helper
Let’s Spend the Night Together
Side 2
Honky Tonk Women
Dandelion
2000 Light Years from Home
Have You Seen Your Mother, Baby, Standing In The Shadow?
Street Fighting Man

More information on The Rolling Stones is available online at http://www.facebook.com/therollingstones,http://www.rollingstones.com and http://twitte.com/rollingstones.To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicksand “Like” it.Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.