‘Havana Moon’ Is A Shining Beacon In The Rolling Stones’ Extensive Live Catalogue

Courtesy: Eagle Rock Entertainment

Courtesy: Eagle Rock Entertainment

The Rolling Stones have held countless concerts in nearly every corner of the world over the course of its nearly 55-year life.  From the UK to Asia and across the Americas, the British rock outfit has been there and done that plenty of times. For all of the concerts that the band has held throughout its life, few have held or hold the importance of the concert that the band held on March 25, 2016.  It was on that night that The Rolling Stones became the first rock band in the country’s history to play a free concert in Havana.  The concert came only days after President Barack Obama became the first American President in 88 years to pay a visit to the island nation.  It was one of the most momentous occasions in the band’s history, and this Friday audiences around the world will be able to see the concert for themselves when Havana Moon is released in stores and online.  The concert boasts plenty of positives, beginning with its set list.  That will be discussed shortly.  The band’s performance of its set list is just as important to note as the songs in examining the recording’s overall presentation.  It will be discussed later.  The concert’s companion booklet rounds out its most important elements.  Each element is important in its own right to the concert’s presentation.  All things considered, they make Havana Moon a shining beacon in The Rolling Stones’ extensive live catalogue.

Havana Moon, The Rolling Stones’ new live recording, is a shining beacon in the band’s extensive live catalogue.  It is a landmark concert because there is no telling if the band will ever perform on the island nation again.  It boasts plenty of positives, beginning with the show’s set list.  The show’s 18-song set list features a favorable sampling of the band’s most beloved songs including ‘Honky Tonk Women,’ ‘Paint It Black,’ ‘Brown Sugar’ and so many others.  There are also some lesser known pieces included in the set list such as ‘Angie,’ ‘You Got The Silver’ and ‘Out Of Control.’  Audiences that pick up this record will find the show’s musical mix relatively familiar due to that set list.  While the set list may not necessarily break any new ground for the band, it was new ground for the audiences in attendance.  Their appreciation for hearing the classic compositions shows throughout the concert.  That appreciation by the audiences will make audiences more familiar with the set list that much more appreciative of the set list even despite already knowing said song.  The familiar set list and the audience’s appreciation of said set list do plenty to make Havana Moon an enjoyable recording.  The band’s performance of each song is just as important to note here as the songs themselves.

The songs that make up the body of Havana Moon are important in their own right to the recording’s presentation.  That is because while the songs are familiar to most audiences, they clearly were not so familiar to the Stones’ Cuban audience.  The audience’s appreciation for the songs will generate a whole new appreciation for the songs among audiences who are more familiar with the songs.  That is because seeing their reaction allows more seasoned audiences to experience the songs in a whole new light.  While the songs and the audience’s appreciation thereof are clearly important to the recording’s presentation, they are not, collectively, the only important pieces of the recording’s presentation.  The band’s performance of the show’s set list is just as important to note as the set list itself.  That is because many of the renditions presented in this concert are unlike any that the band has done before.  The band’s take of ‘Pained Black’ is just one of those unexpected performances.  Most people know this song as being a rather powerful composition thanks to drummer Charlie Watts’ work at the base of the song.  Keith Richards’ guitar line sits atop Watts’ timekeeping and solidifies the song’s instrumentation even more. The band’s performance of the song in Havana is anything but what one would expect of the song.  The band’s performance of the song here is much more reserved than in its normal presentation.  If the band has ever performed the song in the style presented here, then said instances are very rare.  That makes this performance all the more important.  The band’s rendition of ‘Honkey Tonk Women’ stands out just as much here as that of ‘Painted Black.’  It is a little bit slower than the band’s normal renditions, but not by too much; just enough to make it noticeable without taking anything away from the song in this case.  Of course one cannot ignore the extended take of ‘Midnight Rambler’ here.  The band’s performance feels so organic even as it runs more than 15 minutes.  It is one more example of how the band’s performance stands out in this recording just as much as the songs chosen for the concert.  There are plenty of other performances throughout the show that stand as examples of what makes the band’s overall performance just as important to the recording’s presentation as the songs themselves.  All in all, they join with the performances noted here to show in whole why the band’s performance of its set list is just as important to the recording’s presentation as the show’s set list.  It still is not the last important element to discuss.  The recording’s companion booklet is just as important to note in its presentation as the show’s set list and the band’s performance thereof.

The set list that is featured in Havana Moon and the band’s performance thereof are both important in their own right to the recording’s overall presentation.  Audiences who are familiar with the featured songs will gain a whole new appreciation for them as they see the Cuban audience—many of whom were experiencing the songs for the first time ever—show their own appreciation for getting to hear them.  The band’s performance is just as important to note here because in many cases, the band’s performances of certain songs are completely unlike those in any other live setting.  They give said songs brand new identities.  Both elements are clearly important in their own right.  Yet they are not the recording’s only important elements.  The recording’s companion booklet is just as important to note in examining the recording’s overall presentation as the show’s set list and the band’s performance.  That is because it presents a rich background picture of the concert courtesy of Jonathan Watts.  Watts starts the concert’s story with a mention of President Obama making his own historic visit to Cuba only days before The Rolling Stones.  From there, he highlights all of the work that went in to making the “Concert For Amity” a reality.  It then transitions into the story of the concert.  That story includes the reaction of both the band and the audience to one another.  By the time Watts reaches the story’s end, the importance of the concert becomes crystal clear.  He shows through his story why this concert is an important part of not only The Rolling Stones’ history but also of Cuba’s history and that of the entire world.  That understanding creates even more appreciation for the concert, and in turn, leaves audiences understanding that this is truly a special recording that Rolling Stones fans and music lovers alike should have in their music libraries.

Havana Moon is an important piece of Cuba’s history.  It is also an important part of The Rolling Stones’ history and that of the whole world.  The band isn’t the first-ever band to perform in Cuba.  But it is the first band to hold a free concert in the island nation’s capital.  From its set list to the band’s performance to the recording’s companion booklet, there is so much included here that serves to illustrate the importance of the concert.  One could also cite the recording’s editing, varied platforms on which it is available and much more to show why it is such an important performance.  All things considered, Havana Moon shows itself in the end to be a recording that Rolling Stones fans and music lovers alike should have in his or her own music library.  Havana Moon will be available Friday, November 11th in stores and online.  More information on Havana Moon is available online along with all of The Rolling Stones’ latest news and more at:

 

 

 

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Twitter: http://twitter.com/RollingStones

 

 

 

More information on this and other titles from Eagle Rock Entertainment is available online now at:

 

 

 

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Live In Leeds Is One More Welcome Addition To The Rolling Stones’ “From The Vault” Series

Courtesy:  Eagle Rock Entertainment/Universal Music Group

Courtesy: Eagle Rock Entertainment/Universal Music Group

Late last year, Eagle Rock Entertainment teamed up with Universal Music Group and The Rolling Stones and dove into the band’s extensive “Vault” of recordings to release the band’s 1981 performance at the Hampton Coliseum in Hampton, Virginia. The concert was just one of a number of dates in the band’s worldwide tour in support of its then latest album Tattoo You. Now a little more than a year since that recording’s release Eagle Rock, UMG, and The Rolling Stones have partnered once again to bring audiences another performance from that tour in the form of From The Vault: Live in Leeds 1982. The concert, which was originally recorded on July 25th, 1982, was the final show for the European leg of its Tattoo You tour. Being part of said tour, the most important element of this recording is the concert’s set list. It is a near mirror image of last year’s Hampton Coliseum recording. This might not seem important at first glance. but the reality is that it is far more important than many might think. This will be discussed at more length shortly. The band’s stage presence throughout the performance is just as important in the concert’s overall presentation as its set list. That will be discussed in more depth later. Last but hardly least of note in this presentation is the recording’s collective production values. This includes the values of the DVD and CD portion. All three elements play their own important part in the overall presentation of this recording. Of course as important as they are one would be remiss to ignore the recording’s companion booklet. Even that aspect plays its own important part in the whole of the recording as does the recording’s DVD/2 CD packaging. All things considered, From The Vault: Live in Leeds 1982 is one more welcome addition to The Rolling Stones continuing “From The Vault” series.

From The Vault: Live in Leeds 1982 is yet another welcome addition to The Rolling Stones’ “From The Vault” series of concert recordings. Originally recorded on July 25th, 1982 at Roundhay Park in Leeds, England, this recording is a “sister” show to the band’s 1981 show at the Hampton Coliseum in Hampton, Virginia. That recording was released late last year as another part of the band’s “From The Vault” series. Considering the relationship between the two recordings, the most important aspect of the band’s tour finale in Leeds is its set list. The set list is a near mirror image of that presented in the band’s 1981 show at the Hampton Coliseum. It differs by only one song–‘Let It Bleed.’ That song was included in the Hampton Coliseum show but omitted in the Leeds performance. What’s more save for that one omission, the rest of the show’s set list is exactly the same as that in the Hampton Coliseum show. This might not seem all that important to the whole of the recording. But in reality it is extremely important. It is so important because not every Rolling Stones fan might have been lucky enough to pick up the band’s Hampton Coliseum show in its original release last year. This means that said fans now have been given a second chance to experience the same show (for the most part) right down to the set list’s order. And for those that might already own the band’s Hampton Coliseum show, that one minor difference (and of course the birthday wishes to guitarist Keith Richards) makes this recording just as enjoyable as its predecessor. Keeping all of this in mind, the set list presented in the band’s tour finale proves to be just as important to the concert as any of its other elements. Speaking of those other elements, the band’s stage presence throughout the course of the concert is another of those important elements.

The set list presented in the body of the band’s Tattoo You World Tour is a hugely important part of the recording’s overall presentation. It gives audiences the same show as its 1981 concert at the Hampton Coliseum in Hampton, Virginia. The whole reason for that importance has already been noted. In the same vein the band’s stage presence over the course of its two hour-plus concert is just as important to note as the show’s set list. For the most part, the band gives its whole for its audiences from start to finish. Front man Mick Jagger is just as energetic as ever, strutting around the massive stage, keeping the audience worked up and entertained. Guitarists Keith Richards and Ron Wood are just as entertaining to watch as they work their way through each song alongside drummer Charlie Watts. Speaking of Watts, as impressive and enjoyable as his performance was throughout, there was one down moment for him when the band broke into ‘Black Limousine.’ While Wood and Richards swung their way through the bluesy tune, Watts never really seemed to swing with them. He kept time, yes. However he just kept a solid tempo instead of swinging with them. Whether or not he realized he was doing that is anyone’s guess. But it definitely takes away from the song. Luckily it is Watts’ only down side. Bassist Bill Wyman sadly seems just as disinterested as ever in this concert save (go figure) for when the band hits ‘Black Limousine.’ The rest of the time, he barely cracks a smile or even moves around. Of course it is known that in the seven years that followed, things apparently turned sour within the band in its time away from the road. One can’t help but wonder if things had been turning bad at least for Wyman during the course of this tour. After all, when the band returned to the road in 1989 it would be the beginning of the end for Wyman in his time with the band. It’s anyone’s guess. Getting back on topic, the band kept the audience entertained from beginning to end for the most part. This includes the band’s backing musicians–Ian Stewart (piano), Chuck Leavell (keyboards, backing vocals), Gene Barge (saxophone), and Bobby Keys (saxophone)–too. Altogether, the collective performers and their energy make every one of the concert’s twenty-five total songs just as enjoyable for audiences today as they did for those in attendance at the original performance.

The set list and stage presence of the band throughout the course of said set list does plenty to make From The Vault: Live in Leeds 1982 another welcome addition to The Rolling Stones’ “From The Vault” series. Of course as important as both elements are to the whole of the concert’s presentation they are just part of what makes the concert’s overall presentation worth the watch. The concert’s collective production values are just as important as the set list and the band’s stage presence if not more so. The overall production values presented in this recording are impressive in their own right. Of course the inclusion of the concert’s video recording alongside its audio portion plays directly into that. That is because it allows audiences to see the massive size of the venue. It was a rather large outdoor venue. And that posed its own share of challenges both for the concert’s audio engineers and the camera crews. It allowed the sound to spread out everywhere meaning that the engineers had to really work the levels and keep them balanced throughout the concert. They did just that. And while it shows in the concert’s CD portion, it is even clearer in the presentation’s DVD. The venue’s immense size is just as important to note for the concert’s camera crews. That is because of the options and challenges alike that it posed for those individuals. The challenges were raised by the number of concertgoers at the venue. It meant having to work through them in order to capture the concert both in terms of its size and in terms of the band’s performance. The wipes that are used to transition from one angle to another at times show how far such technology has come yet how little it has changed at the same time. The cuts are just as clean as the director went from camera to camera, trying to keep up with Jagger and capture the audience’s energy at the same time. Between those shots and the shots that capture the band’s overall performance the overall camerawork presented throughout the band’s performance here, the concert’s video mix proves just as impressive as the work of those behind the boards. Those that re-mastered the concert for its presentation in this recording are just as much to applaud for their efforts. And together with the show’s set list and the band ‘s presence throughout said list Live in Leeds proves in whole to be one more welcome addition to The Rolling Stones’ “From The Vault” series.

There is a lot that can be said of the latest addition to The Rolling Stones’ “From The Vault” series. The show’s set list complements that of the band’s 1981 concert in Hampton, Virginia since both shows were part of the same overall tour. The band’s stage presence throughout the concert is just as impressive in any of its other performances past and present. This includes the performance of the band’s backing musicians. The overall production values presented in this concert as to be applauded both for the efforts of those that originally recorded the concert and those that re-mastered it for its recent release via Eagle Rock Entertainment and Universal Music Group. As important as those noted elements prove to be to the whole of the recording, they still aren’t the presentation’s only noteworthy elements. One would be remiss to ignore the recording’s companion booklet or the very presentation of the recording on DVD/2 CD combo pack. The companion booklet offers yet another rich history on the concert and its importance. The overall presentation gives audiences the complete concert experience here without forcing them to have to choose between platforms. That is nothing new for Eagle Rock’s live recordings either, thus showing once more why Eagle Rock Entertainment remains today the leading name in live recordings. That full concert experience coupled with the rich history in the recording’s companion booklet round out the recording once and for all, showing in whole why this recording is one more welcome addition to the band’s “From The Vault” series as well as any Rolling Stones fan’s music library. From The Vault: Live in Leeds 1982 is available now in stores and online. More information on this and other titles from Eagle Rock Entertainment is available online now at:

Website: http://www.eagle-rock.com

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Twitter: http://twitter.com/EagleRockNews

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Every Rolling Stones Fan Should Own Live At The Tokyo Dome

Courtesy:  Eagle Rock Entertainment/Universal Music Group

Courtesy: Eagle Rock Entertainment/Universal Music Group

The Rolling Stones is the greatest rock band in the world. Period. That might be something of a subjective statement from this critic. But it is this critic’s own view. The band has spent the better part of half a century and then some proving its greatness. It has done so through the release of nearly thirty albums, at least thirteen live albums, and countless live performances throughout its life. One of those live recordings–Live at The Tokyo Dome–was released late last month as part of the band’s “From The Vault” series of recordings. This recording is one of the most important in the band’s extensive catalogue of live recordings. The main reason for this is the span of time that had passed between this show and the band’s most recent tour at the time, which had ended in Leeds in 1982. That is a span of seven years. While the band’s show at the Tokyo Dome wasn’t the lead off for the band’s Steel Wheels Tour, it still remains an important piece of the band’s history considering that span of time. Staying in that pattern of thought, the band’s stage presence throughout the course of the roughly two-hour performance lies at the center of the recording. That will be discussed shortly. In the same vein, the show’s featured set list is just as important to the presented concert as the band’s performance. Audiences will be interested to learn that of the concert’s twenty-four song set, the majority of its songs were lifted from the band’s older, more familiar albums than the band’s then latest album Steel Wheels. That will be discussed later as it plays its own important role in the whole of this recording. Last but hardly least of note in Live at The Tokyo Dome’s overall presentation is the presentation’s collective production values. The concert’s audio mix is surprisingly impressive. The video portion is just as interesting. That is because it shows just how far video recording technology has come since the concert’s recording. It is one more reason that this concert recording proves to be so important to the band’s history. Together with the band’s performance and its featured set list, the concert in whole shows in the end to be yet another great addition to The Rolling Stones’ “From The Vault” series.

The latest addition to The Rolling Stones’ “From The Vault” series, Live at The Tokyo Dome is one of the most important pieces of the band’s history to be released in recent history. That is because the concert presented here is part of a tour (The “Steel Wheels Tour”) that was the first for the band in seven years at the time. Before the band embarked on the “Steel Wheels Tour” in August 1989, its members had not been out on the road together since having performed in Leeds in 1982. That concert will be released by Eagle Rock Entertainment later this month. Now having noted this, the band’s stage presence in its Valentines Day 1990 concert is the concert’s most important element to note. Core members Mick Jagger and Keith Richards performed like they had never been away from the road. Mick strutted and danced all over the stage from start to finish, giving his all. Just as interesting (if not more so) to note of Jagger’s performance is his interaction with the audience. He spent a fair share of time talking to the audience and even going out into the audience at one point in the show. That’s just one part of what makes his interaction with the audience so intriguing. Most intriguing is that he seemed to speak to the audience in Japanese in more than just a couple of sentences. He really came across as being fluent in the language considering just how much he spoke in the audience’s home language. This is key to note because of just how many performers are trained in just a couple of phrases here in there for their respective foreign audiences even today. Jagger didn’t go that route. He really came across as being quite familiar with the language. It’s refreshing to hear. Moving on, lead guitarist Keith Richards was just as entertaining both as the band’s lead guitarist and in his time on the mic. That’s right. Richards even got his own time on the mic as he had written a pair of songs–‘Can’t Be Seen’ and ‘Happy’–for Steel Wheels. By comparison, bassist Bill Wyman showed nearly no emotion at all throughout the evening’s performance. Of course after the tour wrapped up later that year in Europe, Wyman and the band parted ways. Considering the well publicized issues among the band during its time away from the road prior to the “Steel Wheels Tour,” one becomes less surprised by Wyman’s apparent lack of interest and energy throughout the show. By comparison drummer Charlie Watts looked right at home behind the drum kit from beginning to end. He played his part like it was old hat yet still presented an air of truly enjoying being on stage again. One could also go into the performance provided by the band’s backup singers and musicians. But it goes without saying that their energy was just as positive, leading in turn to a show that audiences watching the show at home today will enjoy just as much as those audiences that were in attendance at the original performance. That is because the band in whole (including the backup performers) performed here as if it had never been away from the road. It’s just one part of the concert’s presentation that makes the recording so enjoyable. The show’s set list is just as important to the recording as the band’s performance.

The Rolling Stones’ stage presence (and that of the band’s backing performers) is central to the overall presentation of Live at The Tokyo Dome. It showed a group of performers that had obviously not lost a step in all of its years off the road and despite its own internal issues. While the musicians’ stage presence is important to the recording’s presentation in its own right, it is only one part of the presentation that should be noted. The show’s featured set list is just as important to the whole of the concert as the band’s stage presence. This is especially the case considering that while the band was touring in support of its then new album Steel Wheels, only five of the show’s twenty-four songs were pulled from that album. The other nineteen songs were older, more familiar tunes. It reaches all the way back to the band’s 1967 album Their Satanic Majesties Request. That album is represented through the song ‘2000 Light Years From Home.’ Beggar’s Banquet, Let It Bleed, Sticky Fingers (which was just recently re-issued), Exile on Main Street, It’s Only Rock ‘N Roll, Tattoo You, and Dirty Work are all represented in the show’s set list. The U.S. release of Between The Buttons is represented, too thanks to the inclusion of ‘Ruby Tuesday.’ Simply put the band included songs from a pretty wide swath of its catalogue up to that point in this show’s set list. This is important to note be cause it shows the band had taken into direct consideration the fact that so much time had passed since it had last toured. So those older songs were likely what audiences really wanted to hear since it’s what those audiences knew. It shows a deep respect for the audience. Considering this, it had to have made audiences respect the band even more in turn. That mutual respect between the band and audience ultimately makes the concert’s set list that much more important of an element in the whole of Live at The Tokyo Dome. And together with the band’s stage presence throughout each song, the two elements together show even more why Live at The Tokyo Dome such an important piece of The Rolling Stones’ history.

The Rolling Stones’ stage presence in Live at The Tokyo Dome and the concert’s set list are both of equal importance to the concert’s overall presentation. While both elements are important in their own right to the whole of this recording, they would be of no consequence without mention of the recording’s collective production values, or its audio and video. Audiences must go into this recording understanding that the concert was recorded in 1990. That was well before the advent of high-definition capabilities. That being the case, the audio mix at least proves to be relatively impressive. That is especially considering the size of the Tokyo Dome. Audiences will note in watching the performance just how open the concert hall is inside. It has very high ceilings and is just as open from wall to wall. That means an increased ability of the sound to echo throughout the hall. Luckily, all involved both at the concert and in preparing this recording handled their duties with the utmost precision. The result is a concert that sounds just as good on Blu-ray (and CD) as it did in the original performance if not better. The video quality is just as interesting. While some of the shots are clear others are at the opposite end of that spectrum. More specifically, there are some shots that are not quite in focus despite the best efforts of those behind the cameras. But they are luckily not enough to really ruin the concert’s overall viewing experience. If anything the combination of those shots and the concert’s re-mastered audio serves to show just how far recording technology has come since this concert was recorded. In its own way it actually makes the overall experience of this concert that much more enjoyable. Because it does, it makes the band’s performance that much more engaging and the show’s set list just as impressive. All things considered, Live at The Tokyo Dome shows in the end to be another welcome addition to The Rolling Stones’ ongoing “From The Vault” series.

The Rolling Stones’ Live at The Tokyo Dome is yet another welcome addition to the band’s ongoing “From The Vault” series. The band’s stage presence exhibits a band in general that had not lost a step despite having been off the road for roughly seven years before it embarked on its “Steel Wheels Tour.” The set list shows a certain amount of respect for fans considering that most of the show’s twenty-four-song set list was pulled from the band’s already extensive catalogue of albums at the time. And the recording’s overall production values show just how far recording technology has come since the concert’s original presentation even as impressive as those values are in their own right. One would be remiss to ignore the recording’s companion booklet and double gatefold packaging. The companion booklet adds even more enjoyment to the overall experience as it presents extra tidbits such as the revelation that the band’s stage setup was so big that it took eighty (yes, eighty) trucks to haul it from venue to venue. The crew required to assemble and break down the set was just as expansive, according to Richard Havers’ notes. It’s tough to figure out conversion rates, but the revelation of tickets to the Tokyo Dome show costing 10,000 Yen is just as eye-opening. These are just a couple of interesting extras that are noted in the companion booklet. And while it might be more bulky than the standard multi-disc setup, the double gatefold packaging of the SD Blu-ray/2-CD combo pack actually protects the discs more than that standard slim packaging. Whether for that packaging, the bonuses added by the companion booklet or for any of the centrally noted elements, it can be said of Live at The Tokyo Dome that the recording in whole is, again, one of the most important pieces of the band’s history and one that any Rolling Stones fan will want to have in his or her own music (and Rolling Stones) library. It is available now in stores and online. More information on this and other titles from Eagle Rock Entertainment is available online now at:

Website: http://www.eagle-rock.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/EagleRockEnt

Twitter: http://twitter.com/EagleRockNews

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

ABKCO Records To Re-Issue Classic Rolling Stones Song This Summer

Courtesy:  ABKCO Records

Courtesy: ABKCO Records

Today, May 12th, is an important date in the modern history of music.

Fifty years ago today, Mick Jagger and his band mates in The Rolling Stones first recorded the band’s hit single ‘(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction.’ While not the band’s first ever single, it was the first of the band’s singles to go #1 in the United States when it made its debut in June of 1965. In celebration of the anniversary ABKCO Records announced Monday that it will release a special edition of the single on vinyl this summer.

ABKCO Records announced Monday that it will release ‘(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction’ as a special 12” limited edition vinyl single on Friday, July 10th on 180-gram vinyl. The A-side will feature the final single known to all audiences. Fans on both sides of the Atlantic will be happy to know that this special edition re-issue will also feature as its B-sides the songs ‘The Under Assistant West Coast Promotion Man’ and ‘The Spider and the Fly.’ The songs in question were its original U.S. and U.K. B-sides respectively. Their appearance here marks the first time ever that they have been presented together on one record. Audiences that might not be so familiar with either single will be interested to learn of the prior of the two singles that its history is rooted in the band’s experience with London Records employee George Sherlock. As the story goes, the band wasn’t entirely enamored with Sherlock. The band allegedly saw him as someone that was just another music industry yes man decked out in a seersucker suit and toupee. The song indirectly makes him the target lyrically as it makes commentary about music industry insiders unnecessarily involving themselves in the creation of bands’ songs. It was loosely based on Buster Brown’s hit single ‘Fannie Mae.’ It wasn’t used in the UK as record executives with DECCA felt that British audiences wouldn’t get the numerous American references throughout the song. That led to Decca opting for ‘The Spider and the Fly’ being used as the B-side for ‘(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction’ in the UK.

The single’s cover features a picture of the band taken by award-winning photographer David Bailey. It is the same cover art used in the original single’s release. Carl Rowatti re-mastered the single at Trutone Mastering Labs from the song’s original mono tapes for its upcoming 45 rpm 12-inch release.

‘(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction’ was originally released as a single by London Records in the U.S. on June 6th, 1965. It reached the #1 spot on Record World’s charts not long after on July 3rd. By July 10th, the single had hit the top spot at Billboard and Cashbox pushing The Byrds’ ‘Mr. Tambourine Man’ and The Four Tops’ ‘I Can’t Help Myself.’ It held the top spot on Record World’s Charts and for four at Billboard and Cashbox respectively. By July 19th of that year, it had gone on to become the band’s first ever single to be certified gold by the RIAA. It would go on to be released August 20th in the UK on DECCA Records and would become the band’s fourth #1 single overseas.

Many audiences might find interesting that both the song’s title and main guitar line were developed by guitarist Keith Richards. And the song that audiences have come to love to this day is not the song’s original take. The original take of the song was recorded at Chess in Chicago on May 10th, 1965 before being tossed. The take that went on to become the final product was recorded at RCA Studios in Hollywood, CA on May 12th. Even more interesting to note of the song is that Richards’ guitar line was originally going to be performed by a horn section instead of guitar. However producer/manager Andrew Loog Oldham and engineer David Hassinger opted for Richards’ guitar instead, leading to the now famed line that audiences know today as one of the most famous in music history. Despite popular belief, the song’s lyrical content does not only make reference to sexual frustration but to a dislike for all of the consumerist messages out there. The icing on the cake of the song’s story is that only two people were against publishing the single—Mick Jagger and Keith Richards.

The upcoming re-issue of ‘(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction’ will be pressed in a limited quantity of 10,000 numbered copies in North America and will be released fifty years to the day that the song was originally released. It can be pre-ordered now via Amazon at http://www.amazon.com/Satisfaction-Anniversary-Single-Limited-Numbered/dp/B00W34SFGM/?tag=httpwwwabkcoc-20. More information on this and other releases from ABKCO Records is available online at:

Website: http://www.abkco.com

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Rolling Stones’ “Clearly Classic” Vinyls Are Among 2014’s Best Re-Issues

Courtesy:  ABKCO

Courtesy: ABKCO

Early this Spring, ABKCO re-issued to audiences around the world three more of The Rolling Stones’ most beloved albums.  The albums in question are: Get Yer Ya-Yas Out: The Rolling Stones in Concert, 12 X 5, and the band’s hits collection Through The Past, Darkly (Big Hits Vol. 2).  All three titles were re-issued as part of ABKCO’s ongoing “Clearly Classic” series.  And for audiences that prefer the vintage sound of vinyl to the more spit-shined sound of music on a CD or an MP3, these three latest re-issues are the perfect fit.  That sound is only part of what audiences will appreciate in these latest re-issues.  That they have been re-issued with their original artwork makes each vinyl even more enjoyable for fans of The Rolling Stones.  Last but definitely not least of all, each of these re-issues can be purchased by themselves or collectively depending on whether or not one already owns the original vinyls.  All three factors together make these vinyls the year’s top three music re-issues of 2014.

The central point in the enjoyment of ABKCO’s recently re-issued Rolling Stones titles is of course its sound. And it goes without saying that the sound on these re-issues could not be better. The sound is just as wonderful as it was in the vinyls’ original releases.  Only in the case of these “Clearly Classic” re-issues, it actually sounds even better as if it was on CD.  It sounds especially impressive on the band’s live release Get Yer Ya-Yas Out: The Rolling Stones in Concert.  Considering how many years ago that concert was originally recorded, it’s incredible that it sounds as good today as it did then.  Those charged with re-mastering the sound on that concert recording or this new re-issue are to be applauded for their efforts.  Much the same can be said of the sound on both 12 X 5 and Through The Past, Darkly (Big Hits Vol. 2).  In the case of the songs on the latter of that pair, they have been added to nearly every one of the Stones’ many hits collections released over the years.  So it’s nice to hear them in one of their earlier hits collections.  There’s just a different quality that can’t be fully put into words.  It is something that must be heard first hand to be fully appreciated.

Audiences will appreciate the sound of the songs on these three latest Rolling Stones re-issues.  The sound on all three vinyls is just as impressive as that of the songs in their CD re-issues. Audiences will also appreciate in these re-issues the fact that they have been presented with their original artwork. There are so many labels out there today that try to revamp albums all the way down to their cover art as a means to market the albums. ABKCO didn’t take that route with these re-issues. It proves once more just how much the company wanted to honor both the historical significance of the albums and the band itself. Even more, it also shows a certain level of respect for the audiences, too. Older audiences will appreciate this as it will add to the sense of nostalgia established through the albums’ re-issues. Younger audiences that might be hearing these releases for the first time will appreciate them more for their historical significance. A comparison of such artwork to that of so many of today’s albums shows a vast stylistic difference. Unlike so many of today’s releases, there is nothing sexy or controversial about these releases’ artwork. That means that the attention will largely be on the music. The end result is a deeper appreciation for music that is plain and simple, real.

The transfer of the Rolling Stones’ original albums from CD back to vinyl on these re-issues is impressive to say the least. The sound quality is just as wonderful as ever. The use of the releases’ original artwork makes the overall listening experience even more enjoyable whether one is new to the world of The Rolling Stones or a far more seasoned fan. There is still one last aspect of these re-issues worth noting in their success. That final aspect in the success of these albums is the ease of purchasing them. They can each be purchased now via Amazon. And all three albums are below the thirty-dollar mark. So they are also affordable for audiences. Considering that many markets lack an indie store where fans could potentially pick up these vinyl re-issues, this ease of ordering becomes an even more important aspect to their overall enjoyment and success. Get Yer YaYas Out can be ordered directly via Amazon at http://smarturl.it/YaYasLP, while 12 X 5 and Through The Past, Darkly (Big Hits Vol. 2) can be ordered at http://smarturl.it/12x5LP and http://smarturl.it/TTPDVinyl respectively. That cost effectiveness and ease of ordering along with the releases’ artwork and quality sound transfer back to vinyl each partners together in the overall presentation of these releases to make them absolute must haves for any true-blooded Rolling Stones fan. It also makes them three of this year’s top new re-issues.

More information on The Rolling Stones is available online at http://www.facebook.com/therollingstones,http://www.rollingstones.com and http://twitter.com/rollingstones.To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

ABKCO Announces New Trio Of “Clearly Classic” Re-Issues

Courtesy:  ABKCO

Courtesy: ABKCO

ABKCO has announced that it will release three more classic Rolling Stones records to its “Clearly Classic” vinyl series this year.

ABKCO’s “Clearly Classic” started in 2013.It has added to that series of releases Get Yer Ya-Yas Out!: The Rolling Stones in Concert, 12X5, and Through The Past, Darkly (Big Hits Volume 2).The new re-issues join ABKCO’s previously released Rolling Stones “Clearly Classic” re-issues Beggars Banquet, Let it Bleed, and Hot Rocks:1964 1971.
 
Get Yer Ya-Yas Out!The Rolling Stones in Concert has the honor of being the first live album by any artist to have reached #1 on the UK charts.The concert on this re-issue was recorded at New York’s Madison Square Garden over the course of November 27thand 28th, 1969 and was the first to feature guitarist Mick Taylor.It is considered the best of the Rolling Stones’ live releases to date.The most notable performance on this recording is the band’s nine-plus minute rendition of ‘Midnight Rambler.’This record can be pre-ordered now online at http://smarturl.it/YaYasLP.
 
12X5 was the Stones’ second full length U.S. release.This album, released in October 1964, combines the band’s EP Five By Five and its singles ‘It’s All Over Now’ and ‘Time Is On My Side’ as well as their B-sides.The record also features three more tracks that would go on to be included in the Stones’second UK full length album The Rolling Stones No. 2.The upcoming “Clearly Classic” re-issue of this album is based on the original mono mix of the album.It can be pre-ordered now online at http://smarturl.it/12x5LP.
 
Through The Past, Darkly (Big Hits Volume 2) is the second of The Rolling Stones’ compilation albums.It was originally released in September 1969.The first of the Stones’compilations was titled Big Hits (High Tide and Green Grass).Through The Past, Darkly (Big Hits Volume 2) reached #2 both in the U.S. and UK upon its original release.It includes a number of the Rolling Stones’greatest and most beloved songs including: ‘Jumpin’ Jack Flash’,Let’s Spend the Night Together’ and ‘Honky Tonk Woman.’Fans will appreciate that even in its re-issue, ABKCO has maintained the original album’s octagonal packaging.Inside the packaging, audiences will find a poem penned by Brian Jones who would pass away only two months before the original release of this album.Jones’ poem is below.This re-issue can be pre-ordered now online at http://smarturl.it/TTPDVinyl.
When this you see, remember me,
and bear me in your mind.
Let all the world say what they may,
speak of me as you find.
 
The track listing for each of the three upcoming “Clearly Classic” Rolling Stones re-issues is listed below.
 
Track Listings:
Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out! The Rolling Stones in Concert
Side 1
Jumpin’ Jack Flash
Carol
Stray Cat Blues
Love in Vain
Midnight Rambler
Side 2
Sympathy For the Devil
Live With Me
Little Queenie
Honky Tonk Women
Street Fighting Man
12 X 5
Side 1
Around and Around
Confessin’ the Blues
Empty Heart
Time Is on My Side
Good Times, Bad Times
It’s All Over Now
Side 2
2120 South Michigan Avenue
Under the Boardwalk
Congratulations
Grown Up Wrong
If You Need Me
Susie Q
Through the Past, Darkly (Big Hits Vol. 2)
Side 1
Ruby Tuesday
She’s A Rainbow
Jumpin’ Jack Flash
Mother’s Little Helper
Let’s Spend the Night Together
Side 2
Honky Tonk Women
Dandelion
2000 Light Years from Home
Have You Seen Your Mother, Baby, Standing In The Shadow?
Street Fighting Man

More information on The Rolling Stones is available online at http://www.facebook.com/therollingstones,http://www.rollingstones.com and http://twitte.com/rollingstones.To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicksand “Like” it.Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Jenkins’ Latest Compilation LP A Wonderful Tool For Teachers

Courtesy:  Smithsonian Folkways

Courtesy: Smithsonian Folkways

Mick Jagger and his band mates in The Rolling Stones have been entertaining audiences for over half a century.  Aerosmith has been going near as long.  And others are right up in those same leagues, too.  But none of those artists and bands in question can say that they’re at the level of one Ella Jenkins.  “The First Lady of Children’s Music” as she is affectionately known by her fellow artists is ninety-years old.  And now at ninety-years old, Jenkins has a new “hits” compilation of sorts set to be released.  123s and ABCs will be released next Tuesday, January 28th.  The compilation collects pieces that Jenkins has included in previous recordings.  The recordings in question are more proof of what makes children’s recordings in question so interesting and enjoyable to review.  Simply put, none of the pieces included on this record are anything like anything recorded by any other children’s entertainer to date.

The songs culled for 123s and ABCs are unlike anything recorded by any other children’s entertainer to date.  That is an especially powerful statement considering that the tracks presented here are pulled from Jenkins’ previous recordings.  While she does directly speak to young listeners at times, she seems to spend more time talking to children with whom she recorded the respective pieces.  This focus less on listeners makes 123s and ABCs more a tool for teachers of young listeners.  Some might see this as a bad think.  But in reality, it takes nothing away from this compilation.  It helps give preschool and kindergarten teachers plenty of ideas for their own students in many cases.  One of the best examples of this is in Jenkins’ teaching of the numbers one through ten in both Spanish and Swahili.

In the cases of ‘Counting from One to Ten in Spanish’ and ‘Counting in Swahili’, Jenkins is teaching a group of young children already in attendance how to count to ten in both languages.  She uses a call and response format in order to keep the terms fresh in her listeners’ minds.  This is quite a smart teaching method.  Teachers could easily adapt the prior of the pair for their own classrooms and use it as the beginning of a more extended lesson on basic Spanish.  Considering the push for students to learn foreign languages, what better time to get students started than in their most pivotal developmental years?  In the case of ‘Counting in Swahili’, even adults will enjoy this short lesson.  That is because far fewer Americans have knowledge of even basic Swahili than do those with basic knowledge and comprehension of Spanish.  Keeping this in mind, ‘Counting in Swahili’ could be a wonderful chance for parents and their children to learn together.  It could also be just as effective a tool for a basic cultural lesson about native speakers of Swahili.  It serves to make this compilation all the more enjoyable for teachers, students, and children in general.

‘Counting in Swahili’ is a hugely effective song for teachers.  As noted, it can serve as a basic introduction to a rarely taught foreign language.  It also could serve as a window to a much more in-depth cultural lesson for younger listeners and students.  Much the same can be noted of ‘The Rabbi Teaches ABCs/English ABC Song.’  This hybrid piece opens with violist Arnold Radel performing a traditional Jewish composition.  He follows this by explaining how children learned their ABCs in Yiddish in the cold winter months, no source of heat in their homes save for a fire in the stoves in their kitchens.  This vivid description alone makes Radel’s performance even more hard hitting.  One can actually close one’s eyes, and see this scene, Radel’s music as a bed.  Whether one has any comprehension of Yiddish or not, this song could be a great stepping stone for those that might end up developing an interest in the language or even the culture of those that speak the language.  It’s one more example of the kind of material that makes 123s and ABCs such an interesting compilation of songs.  Teachers and parents are offered plenty more ingenious ideas how to teach young listeners the basics throughout the course of the compilation’s sixteen total songs.  123s and ABCs can be ordered online via Amazon at http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00H8RREL6/ref=s9_simh_gw_p15_d0_i1?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=center-2&pf_rd_r=1AQT2M8K05BB6QZ3MD0D&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=1688200382&pf_rd_i=507846.  More information on Jenkins and her releases is available online at http://www.facebook.com/ella.jenkins.sfw and http://www.ellajenkins.com.  To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.