Arrow Video, MVD Entertainment Group Partnering To Re-Issue Billy Wilder’s Directorial Debut

Courtesy: Arrow Video/MVD Entertainment Group/Paramount Pictures

Arrow Video and MVD Entertainment Group will re-issue one of director Billy Wilder’s beloved classic movies later this month.

The Major and the Minor is scheduled for release Sept. 24 on Blu-ray.  The movie, which originally debuted Dec. 24, 1942 through Paramount Pictures (and was Wilder’s American debut), stars Ginger Rogers and Ray Milland in its lead roles. Its story, co-written by Wilder and Charles Brackett, finds Rogers portraying a financially struggling woman named Susan Applegate, who pretends to be 11 years-old in order to buy a half-price train ticket.

When she is found out, Susan runs from her accusers, only to end up running into the train compartment of one Major Philip Kirby, a military instructor who at first believes the woman is indeed a girl.  He takes Susan under his wing, but when his fiance — played by Rita Johnson — meets her, she becomes very suspicious of Susan.

While the story itself is a rom-com, it actually boasts a deeper concept — that of exploring themes of identity and deception.

The movie’s upcoming re-issue will feature a handful of bonuses, such as an archived interview with Ray Milland, a rare hour-long radio adaptation of the movie, which debuted in 1943, and collector’s booklet with essay by Ronald Reagan.  The booklet will only come in the movie’s first pressing.

More information on this and other titles from Arrow Films is available online now at:

 

Website: http://www.arrowfilms.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ArrowVideo

Twitter: http://twitter.com/ArrowFilmsVideo

 

More information on this and other titles from MVD Entertainment Group is available online now at:

 

Website: http://mvdentertainment.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/MVDEntertainmentGroup

Twitter: http://twitter.com/mvdentgroup

 

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‘The Illusionist’ Maintains Its Cinematic Magic In Its New Latest Re-Issue

Courtesy: 20th Century Fox/MVD Entertainment Group/MVD Visual

MVD Entertainment Group has added 20th Century Fox’s period drama The Illusionist to its MVD Marquee collection.  The company is scheduled to re-issue the movie, which stars Paul Giamatti (Sideways, Cinderella Man, 12 Years A Slave), Edward Norton (The Incredible Hulk, American History X, Birdman) and Jessica Biel (I Now Pronounce You Chuck & Larry, 7th Heaven, I’ll Be Home For Christmas) in its lead roles, on June 25.  The movie itself is one of the most underappreciated movies of the 1990s, and the upcoming re-issue serves to remind audiences of exactly that.  That is due in part to the movie’s story, which will be addressed shortly.  Its bonus content,  which will be addressed a little later, adds even more interest to the re-issue’s presentation.  The collective work of the movie’s cast and crew also adds to the story and will be addressed later.  When it is coupled with the movie’s story, all of the elements together show why this latest presentation of The Illusionist is more cinematic magic.

MVD Entertainment Group’s forthcoming re-issue of 20th Century Fox’s period drama The Illusionist is a positive offering for most audiences.  That is due in part to the movie’s story.  The story — based on a short story crafted by author Steven Millhauser — is a fully-engaging and entertaining presentation that is full of magic, murder, mystery and romance.  Those elements are all expertly balanced throughout the course of the story, too.  It is set in 19th Century Vienna, Austria (but was actually filmed in The Czech Republic – this will be discussed later) and features Norton and Giamatti as Eisenheim and Inspector Uhl respectively.  Eisenheim, who was friends with the Duchess Sophie van Techen (Biel) when the pair was much younger, wants to reconnect with the Duchess.  The problem for Eisenheim is that Uhl, who is working for Crown Prince Leopold (Refus Sewell – A Knight’s Tale, Dark City, Tristan + Isolde), stands in his way.  Eisenheim and Uhl eventually develop a certain almost friendship as the story progresses while tensions between Eisenheim and Leopold increase right up to the story’s climactic conclusion.  The story’s run time is listed at 109 minutes (1 hour, 49 minutes), but because of the pacing, feels longer than that noted time.  What’s truly interesting is that usually when pacing makes a move feel longer than it is, that is a bad thing.  In the case of this story though, it is the exact opposite.  Somehow, writer/director Neil Burger, who adapted Millhauser’s short story to the screen, managed to make the story work even despite that feel.  That is a tribute to his work.  Even with the pacing seeming slow at times, the story is still able to keep viewers engaged and entertained with ease.  The movie’s twist ending gives viewers a finale that is completely fulfilling.  That fulfillment finale, and the ability of the movie’s story to keep viewers engaged and entertained creates a strong foundation for The Illusionist and gives viewers more than enough reason to watch this movie.  As much as the movie’s story does for its presentation, its bonus content adds even more to the movie’s presentation.

The bonus content featured in MVD Entertainment Group’s forthcoming re-issue of The Illusionist is carried directly over from the movie’s most recent release, its 2007 release.  That includes not just the brief making of featurette and equally brief conversation with Biel, but also the feature-length audio commentary from writer/director Neil Burger.  The commentary is listed, in this re-issue, as an audio option instead of a bonus extra, unlike the 2007 home release, as an added note, but it is still the most important of the movie’s extras.  Burger  presents a lot of information in his commentary, such as the revelation that most of the movie was recorded on site in Prague, Czech Republic and that his adaptation of the original short story The Illusionist is quite different from its literary source material.  Considering the number of differences that he addresses, it makes one want to find said story and see just how different the two stories are.  That is just some of the content revealed through Burger’s commentary. He also reveals that Norton and Biel were not the first choices for their respective roles.  Those discussions are themselves certain to generate plenty of discussion, and in turn are more proof of why Burger’s commentary should have been featured in The Illusionist’s latest re-issue.  They are certainly just the tip of the proverbial iceberg that is his commentary.  As the movie progresses, he shares far more that audiences can discover for themselves.  Keeping that in mind, Burger’s bonus commentary builds on the foundation formed by the movie’s story and strengthens it that much more.  It is still not the last of the movie’s positives.  The collective work of the movie’s cast and crew couples with the story and commentary to give audiences even more to appreciate.

The work of all four of the movie’s lead cast members is worthy of applause in its own way throughout the movie.  Burger notes in the movie’s audio commentary (along with so much more already noted) that he made Eisenheim more of a sympathetic character by using Inspector Uhl more than he was in the movie’s source material.  The thing is that Norton’s abilities as an actor did not even call for more inclusion of Uhl.  Given, Norton and Giamatii were just enjoyable on-screen together as they were on their own, but Norton’s own abilities were more than enough to make his work engaging and entertaining in its own right.  His emoting during his time on stage in front of Eisenheim’s audiences is just one example of that talent.  His tears were just as believable as he reaches out for Sophie’s hand in the final act when he is on stage.  The pain that he displays translates so well, even if it is all part of his act to trick everyone.  Much the same can be said of Giamatti that is said of Norton.  When Giamatti is set alongside Sewell, he [Giamatti] shines even more while Sewell, as more of a supporting character, makes it just as easy for audiences to dislike Leopold.  Burger discusses this, too, in the commentary. Viewers will agree with his comments here, too.  What’s more, viewers will also appreciate the discussions by Burger on the amount of research that was done to make The Illusionist look just like 19th Century Vienna in terms of costumes and even buildings.  That research clearly paid off, as the resultant work of the movie’s costume and set designers created an environment that was just as believable as the work of the movie’s cast, getting back on track.  It is even noted by Burger, that Eddie Marsan (who played Eisenheim’s manager) was in his 30s when the movie was crafted, yet he looked like he was in his 50s.  That is another tribute to the work of the movie’s crew.  If one did not know what Burger revealed in the commentary, one would in fact think Marsan was in his 50s.  Getting back on the matter of the cast and crew’s work, it couples with Burger’s work on the movie’s script and his commentary, to make the movie appealing for everyone.

MVD Entertainment Group’s upcoming Blu-ray re-issue of 20th Century Fox’s The Illusionist is a work that will entertain any true movie buff.  That is due, as noted, in part to the movie’s story.  The story expertly balances elements of magic, murder, mystery and romance to make a whole that will keep viewers engaged from beginning to end.  That is due in part to the movie’s story, adapted by writer/director Neil Burger to the screen and to the commentary provided throughout the movie as a bonus commentary.  The work of the movie’s cast and crew adds to its enjoyment, too.  Each item is important in its own way to the whole of The Illusionist.  All things considered, they show why The Illusionist is its own magical cinematic diamond in the rough.  More information on this and other titles from MVD Entertainment Group is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://mvdvisual.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/MVDEntertainmentGroup

Twitter: http://twitter.com/mvdentgroup

 

 

 

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MVD Entertainment Group Re-Issuing ‘The Andromeda Strain’

Courtesy: MVD Entertainment Group/Universal Pictures

MVD Entertainment Group is bringing Universal Pictures’ adaptation of the late Michael Crichton’s novel The Andromeda Strain back to home video.

The movie is scheduled for re-issue Tuesday on Blu-ray.  Originally having made its theatrical debut on March 12, 1971, the movie’s story follows a group of scientists who are working to stop an alien virus from wiping out mankind after a satellite carrying the virus crash lands on Earth.

The movie was nominated for two Oscars and a Golden Globe Award, and lauded by the revered film critic Roger Ebert.  Ebert said of the movie, that it is “splendid entertainment.”

The movie’s upcoming re-issue will feature a variety of extras, such as a feature-length audio commentary from critic Bryan Reesman, The featurette, “A New Strain of Science Fiction: A newly-filmed appreciation by critic Kim Newman” and original 2001 featurette, “A Portrait of Michael Crichton,” which features an interview with the late, great author.  The full list of the movie’s extras is noted below.

Bonus Materials

  • New restoration by Arrow Films from a 4K scan of the original camera negative
  • High Definition (1080p) Blu-Ray presentation
  • Original uncompressed mono audio, newly remastered for this release
  • Optional English subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing
  • Audio commentary by critic Bryan Reesman
  • A New Strain of Science Fiction, a newly-filmed appreciation by critic Kim Newman
  • The Andromeda Strain: Making The Film, an archive featurette from 2001 directed by Laurent Bouzereau and featuring interviews with director Robert Wise and screenwriter Nelson Gidding
  • A Portrait of Michael Crichton, an archive featurette from 2001 directed by Laurent Bouzereau and featuring an interview with author Michael Crichton
  • Cinescript Gallery, highlights from the annotated and illustrated shooting script by Nelson Gidding
  • Theatrical trailer, TV spots and radio spots
  • Image gallery
  • BD-ROM: PDF of the 192-page “cinescript” with diagrams and production designs
  • Reversible sleeve featuring original and newly commissioned artwork by Corey Brickley
  • FIRST PRESSING ONLY: Illustrated collector’s booklet featuring new writing on the film by Peter Tonguette and archive publicity materials

The Andromeda Strain can be ordered online via MVD Entertainment Group’s official online store.  More information on this and other titles from MVD Entertainment Group is available online now at:

 

Website: http://www.mvdvisual.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/MVDEntertainmentGroup

Twitter: http://twitter.com/mvdentgroup

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

 

MVD Entertainment Group To Re-Issue ‘The Illusionist’ This Month

Courtesy: 20th Century Fox/MVD Entertainment Group/MVD Visual

MVD Entertainment Group has added 20th Century Fox’s 2006 period drama The Illusionist to its MVD Marquee series.

The company is scheduled to re-issue the movie, which stars Paul Giamatti (SidewaysCinderella Man12 Years A Slave), Edward Norton (The Incredible HulkAmerican History XBirdman) and Jessica Biel (7th HeavenI Now Pronounce You Chuck & LarryI’ll Be Home For Christmas) in its lead roles.

The movie’s story, which is set in 19th Century Vienna, features Norton and Giamatti as Eisenheim and Inspector Uhl respectively.  Eisenheim wants to win the affections of the Duchess Sophie van Teschen (Biel), but Uhl stands in Eisenheim’s way, working for the Crown Prince Leopold (Rufus Sewell — A Knight’s TaleDark CityTristan + Isolde) as he, too, looks to win Sophie’s hand and heart, but for his own selfish purposes rather than for love.  The story follows Eisenheim as he uses his magic skills to win over Sophie and ultimately results in a twist ending that viewers never would have seen coming.

MVD Entertainment’s forthcoming re-issue of The Illusionist will feature the same bonus features included in the movie’s original release, a feature-length commentary from writer/director Neil Burger, a making of featurette and interview with Biel, in which she discusses the movie.

More information on this and other titles from MVD Entertainment Group is available online now at:

 

Website: http://mvdvisual.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/MVDEntertainmentGroup

Twitter: http://twitter.com/mvdentgroup

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like “it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

MVD Entertainment Group Announces Release Date, Specs For ‘Double Dragon’ Re-Issue

Courtesy: MVD Entertainment Group

MVD Entertainment has a special treat coming in the new year for gamers everywhere.

The company recently announced it will re-issue the 1994 cinematic adaptation of the classic video game Double Dragon on Jan. 22 on a Blu-ray/DVD combo pack.  The movie will be re-issued as part of MVD’s MVD Rewind Collection. Pre-orders are open now. A trailer for the movie is streaming online now here.

MVD’s forthcoming Double Dragon re-issue will feature a wide array of bonus content, such as the pilot episode of Double DragonThe Animated Series, a new “making of” documentary and new featurette on the movie’s producer, Don Murphy.

The full list of the movie’s bonus content is noted below.

Bonus Materials
* High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) and Standard Definition DVD presentations of the main feature
* Audio: English 5.1 Stereo, English 2.0 Stereo, German 2.0 Stereo
* English, French and Spanish Subtitles
* NEW! “The Making of Double Dragon” (full length documentary featuring interviews with stars Scott Wolf and Marc Dacascos, writers Peter Gould & Michael Davis and producer Don Murphy)
* NEW! “Don Murphy: Portrait of a Producer” featurette
* Archival ”Making of” featurette
* Behind the Scenes featurette
* 1993 Double Dragon Animated Series Pilot Episode #101: “The Shadow Falls”
* Storyboard Gallery
* Press Photos, Marketing and Behind The Scenes Photo Galleries
* TV Spots
* VHS Home Video Trailer
* Original Theatrical Trailer
* Collectible Mini-Poster
* Reversible Sleeve Featuring Alternate Artwork

The story at the center of Double Dragon, follows two teenage brothers — Jimmy (Mark Dacascos — The Island of Dr. MoreauDriveOnly The Strong) and Billy Lee (Scott Wolf — Party of FiveNight ShiftPerception) as the pair works to protect their half of a magical amulet from the evil tycoon Koga Shuko (Richard Patrick — Terminator 2The X-FilesWayne’s World).  Shuko has the other half of the amulet, and wants the brothers’ half of the amulet so that he can have untold power.  Billy and Jimmy are aided in their efforts by Marian (Alyssa Milano — CharmedCommandoWho’s The Boss) and her vigilante group, The Power Corps.

MVD Entertainment Group Director of Acquisitions and Sales Eric D. Wilkinson spoke highly of the movie’s forthcoming re-issue.

Double Dragon was arguably one of my favorite projects for the Rewind Collection,” Wilkinson said.  “This release marks the first time Double Dragon will be available on Blu-ray and in HD in North America!  Special features producer Richard Schenkman and I worked tirelessly to create some amazing brand new bonus material that includes a feature-length “making of” documentary that I know collectors will love.  These new bonus features, along with some great archival bonus material, and the addition of the pilot of the Double Dragon animated television series (courtesy of Invincible Entertainment) MVD is proud to present the definitive edition of Double Dragon in a kick-ass (pun intended) Blu-ray + DVD combo pack collector’s set.”

Double Dragon was directed by James Yukich (Jeff BeckLive at the Hollywood Bowl, Def LeppardAnd There Will Be a Next TimeMegadethCountdown to Extinction Live), produced by Don Murphy (TransformersNatural Born KillersFrom Hell), Jane Hamsher (From HellNatural Born KillersThe War of the Roses) and Alan Schecter (Fair Gamethe Last Boy ScoutShowdown) and written by Michael Davis (Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles IIEight Days A Week100 Girls), Emmy Award-winner peter Gould (Breaking BadBetter Call SaulToo Big To Fail), Paul Dini (BatmanThe Animated SeriesBatman BeyondLost) and Neal Shusterman (GoosebumpsThe Haunting HourCry Victory).

More information on this and other titles from MVD Entertainment Group is available online now at:

 

Website: http://mvdentertainment.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/MVDEntertainmentGroup

Twitter: http://twitter.commvdentgroup

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

 

 

 

 

‘Prehysteria’ Re-issue Is An Enjoyable Offering For The Whole Family

Courtesy: Moonbeam Entertainment/Full Moon Features/MVD Entertainment Group

Dinosaurs are big business for Hollywood.  From the Jurassic Park franchise to Disney Pixar’s The Good Dinosaur to Blue Sky Studios’ Ice Age franchise and more, dinosaurs have brought in big bucks for Hollywood throughout the years.  Now thanks to MVD Distribution, a slightly lesser-known dino-centric flick has been brought back to light in the form of Prehysteria for audiences to enjoy again for the first time.  Originally released as a direct-to-VHS flick more than 25 years ago from Moon Beam Pictures – an imprint of Full Moon Features – it was re-issued on Blu-ray/DVD combo pack Oct. 9 via Full Moon Features, and is a welcome offering for most families even today.  That is proven in part through the nearly 90-minute movie’s story.  The story will be discussed shortly.  The movie’s bonus material adds to the movie’s presentation, and will be discussed a little later.  Its average price point rounds out its most important elements.  Each item is important in its own way to the whole of Prehysteria.  All things considered, Prehysteria proves to be a work that while maybe not as well-known as other dino-centric flicks, is still a fun family flick.

Moon Beam Pictures’ newly re-issued indie dino flick Prehysteria is a welcome, fun family flick.  It is an underrated and underappreciated addition to Hollywood’s much hyped prehistoric realm (and yes, that awful pun was intended).  That is proven in part through the story at the center of the movie.  The story centers on the Taylor family — Jerry (Austin O’Brien — The Last Action HeroMy Girl 2The Lawnmower Man), his sister Monica (Samantha Mills — Step By StepCalifornia Dreams, The Family Man) and their father Frank (Brett Cullen — Ghost RiderThe Dark Knight RisesPerson of Interest) as they deal with a group of newborn dinosaurs brought home by their family dog, Ruby, who is clearly mourning the loss of her puppies.  As is explained through the movie, Frank gave away Ruby’s last litter of puppies, so she takes on the pigmy dinos as her own.  Plenty of hilarity ensues in the Taylor household after the dinosaurs — named after the family’s favorite musicians – are born.  From the little dinos making a mess of the Taylor family’s kitchen, to the adorable little creatures finding the beat as Elvis plays just outside their room and more, the smiles and “awwwws” are plentiful.  Meanwhile, an evil museum curator named Rico Sarno (Stephen Lee — War GamesThe NegotiatorBurlesque) is out to get the tiny dinos back, leading to even more laughs, and some action in the process.  What’s interesting here is that plot point involving Sarno trying to get the little dinosaurs is somewhat similar to one of the plot points of Jurassic Park, which actually came out after this movie.  So to that end, it makes that plot point even more interesting when added to the whole of the story.  Of course, the whole thing has a happy ending, though the ending is left somewhat up in the air.  Not too much will be given away here, but the story is left rather open-ended in its very last scene.  The result is that audiences will be left feeling uncomfortable because it does not leave viewers with that full sense of closure that a finale needs.  Director Charles Band and star Austin O’Brien talk about this and much more in the bonus audio commentary, which, as one of the movie’s bonus features, adds its own interest to the movie’s presentation.

Getting back to the movie’s story, there are some plot holes, not the least of which being the issue of how the dinos survived in the Taylor’s house for such a long time if they in fact needed a very hot, humid climate in order to survive – according to Vicki (Colleen Morris) late in the movie.  In retrospect, it leaves one scratching one’s head even more.  Even with that and other plot issues in mind, the movie is still a fun flick that the whole family will enjoy taking in every now and then.

While the story, even with its plot holes and other issues, does plenty to make this little-known family flick well worth at least one watch, it is only part of the movie’s success in its recent re-issue.  The bonus material included in the movie’s new home release adds even more interest to the presentation.  The bonus commentary, noted above, offers just as much entertainment as the story at the movie’s center.  Throughout the movie, director Charles Band and lead star Austin O’Brien share plenty of insight and entertainment.  O’Brien reveals that one of the scenes involving the family truck was so hot that ice had to be put into the truck bed for “Ruby” to sit on so that the dog could stay cool.  That was because the movie was shot largely in Los Angeles.  Another interesting tidbit to learn is that the very first appearance of the dinosaurs was shot on a stage placed five feet above the ground.  That was so as to allow all of the puppeteers to do their jobs controlling the dinosaurs from below.  Staying on that same note, Band also reveals during that noted sequence that he is – even in August, 2018 – against studios’ use of CG.  This is a rare view from film makers today, even despite the cost.  As noted above, the duo also takes on the movie’s rather odd, uncomfortable ending, actually pointing out how bad that final scene was.  Again, that final scene won’t be revealed here, but it really does ruin the otherwise happy closure offered just before that scene.  It’s just one more interesting note shared throughout the course of the movie’s 83-minute run time.  There is also a note from O’Brien himself that prior to the movie, he himself was unfamiliar with Elvis and Elvis’ career, so he had to do a lot of cramming in order to get familiar with Elvis for the movie.  Band also notes, surprisingly, that prior to watching the movie with O’Brien back in August of this year for the commentary, that he had not actually watched Prehysteria in full since its debut.  That is kind of odd, considering the movie’s cult following.  One would have thought he would have had more pride in the movie.  That aside, that revelation, the others noted here and so much more offers plenty for audiences to appreciate.  Keeping this in mind, the audio commentary is just one of the bonuses worth discussing here.  The bonus “Videozone” featurette offers its own interest to the movie’s presentation.

The “Videozone” featurette included in the movie’s re-issue is important to discuss because it is, for all intents and purposes, a “making of” featuerette.  Audiences get in this featurette a vintage look back in time at the original cast interviews that are in themselves eye-opening.  There are notes about which cast members did and did not have that much fun making the movie.  Band also offers his own thoughts in the vintage interviews alongside his father and Prehysteria co-director Albert Band that gives even more insight into the movie’s creation.  As if these interviews are not enough, audiences are also treated to a companion feature that shows how the dinosaurs were created, using wires and special modeling clay.  The whole of the features here shows even more, the importance of the movie’s bonus material.  Between everything offered throughout the “Videozone” featurette and the bonus feature-length commentary, the bonus material included in this re-issue makes the movie so much more entertaining and in turn worth the money spent.  Speaking of money, the movie’s average price point rounds out its most important elements.

The average price point for Prehysteria’s re-issue is $27.15.  That price is determined using prices from Amazon, Walmart, Best Buy, Target, Barnes & Noble, Books-A-Million and MVD Entertainment’s online store.  MVD is included as it is the company handling the movie’s distribution.  On the surface, some might say that this price is a little high.  However, taking into consideration everything noted in this review, and that the bonus commentary and “Videozone” featurette are included not just on Blu-ray, but also on DVD, that price actually becomes quite affordable.  It is actually on par with prices for movies that are far more well-known and released in their own BD/DVD combo packs.  In other words, audiences will not break the bank at such a cost.  Keeping this in mind, along with the entertainment and insight offered through the movie and its bonus material, and that dual availability through the packaging, this presentation proves to be one that proves well worth the money and being added to any family’s movie library.

Full Moon Features/Moon Beam Pictures’ recent re-issue of Prehysteria is an enjoyable presentation for families seeing it for the first time and for those seeing it for the first time again.  As has been discussed here, that is due in part to a story that even despite its plot holes, is still fun and endearing.  In turn, it is sure to keep the whole family entertained from start to finish.  The bonus material included in the movie’s new re-issue adds to that enjoyment.  When the main feature and secondary material is taken collectively into consideration, they make the average price point of just under $30 well-spent.  Keeping that in mind, the package in whole proves to be a positive presentation that the whole family will enjoy.  It is available now.  More information on this and other titles being distributed via MVD Entertainment Group is available online now at:

 

 

 

Websitehttp://mvdentertainment.com

Facebookhttp://www.facebook.com/MVDEntertainmentGroup

Twitterhttp://twitter.com/mvdentgroup

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

MVD Entertainment Going “Prehysteric” Next Month

Courtesy: Moonbeam Entertainment/Full Moon Features/MVD Entertainment Group

Dinosaurs are taking over this fall, but they’re not the dinosaurs one might think!

Full Moon Features announced this week that it will release the family-friendly 1993 live action/stop motion hybrid dino flick Prehysteria! on Blu-ray/DVD combo pack next month through MVD Entertainment.  The movie, released originally through its imprint Moonbeam Entertainment, is scheduled to be re-issued Oct. 9.

The story centers on the Taylor family — Jerry (Austin O’Brien — The Last Action HeroMy Girl 2The Lawnmower Man), his sister Monica (Samantha Mills — Step By StepCalifornia Dreams, The Family Man) and their father Frank (Brett Cullen — Ghost RiderThe Dark Knight RisesPerson of Interest) as they deal with a group of newborn dinosaurs brought home by their family dog.  Plenty of hilarity ensues in the Taylor household after the dinosaurs — named after the family’s favorite musicians — but that’s not all.  An evil museum curator named Rico Sarno (Stephen Lee — War GamesThe NegotiatorBurlesque) is out to get the tiny dinos back, leading to even more laughs.

The re-issue comes a little more than 25 years after it originally premiered on VHS on June 1, 1993.  A trailer for the movie is streaming online now herePre-orders for the movie are open now.

More information on this and other titles from MVD Entertainment is available online now at:

 

Website: http://mvdentertainment.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/MVDEntertainmentGroup

Twitter: http://twitter.com/mvdentgroup

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.