PBS Distribution To Release New ‘Nature’ Episode Next Month

Courtesy: PBS/PBS Distribution/WNET

Courtesy: PBS/PBS Distribution/WNET

PBS Distribution will release a high flying new episode of its hit wildlife series Nature next month on DVD and Blu-ray.

Nature: Super Hummingbirds will be released on Tuesday, Nov. 22.  The program examines the “super powers” that make hummingbirds one of the most incredible species of bird in the world.

The program is Emmy-winning filmmaker Ann Johnson Prum’s (Hummingbirds: Magic in the Air, An Original DUCKumentary, Animal Homes) second film focusing on hummingbirds.  The program focuses on new discoveries about hummingbirds.

Those new discoveries include how hummingbirds actually manage to drink nectar from flowers so quickly, and what allows them to survive in settings that are otherwise uninhabitable for other creatures.

For the first time ever, audiences will also get to see in this documentary how hummingbirds mate (meaning some parental discretion may be advised for younger viewers), lay eggs, fight, and even raise families.

The hour-long program opens with the research of Dr. Alejandro Rico-Guevara explaining how hummingbirds are able to lap up nectar at 20 times per second.  This is done through the use of a clear feeding tube and a real flower.  The flower contained the same amount of nectar found in a real bloom.

High speed macro photography reveals the birds’ secret; a secret that audiences will discover for themselves when they order the episode for themselves.

Dr. Christopher Witt and his team of researchers are also presented in this episode as they uncover the secret to hummingbirds’ ability to survive at altitudes where oxygen is 40 percent more scarce than at sea level.  Experiments conducted with the birds revealed a very stunning connection between the birds’ hemoglobin and their ability to survive at those high altitudes.  Research also revealed a connection between the birds’ ability to fly at high speeds and their ability to capture extra oxygen as they fly and breath.

The program’s final segment audiences are taken to the rainforests of Costa Rica where Dr. Marcelo Araya-Salas and researchers from Cornell University have spent seven years studying the mating habits of hummingbirds.  The group filmed more than 2,000 hours of footage in its research and caught the first footage of hummingbirds mating in that footage.

The whole thing ends with a life cycle of the hummingbird, from nest building, to parenthood to the first flight.

Nature: Super Hummingbirds originally premiered on PBS stations nationwide on Oct. 13.  It will be available on DVD and Blu-ray on Nov. 22 and will retail for MSRP of $24.99 on DVD and $29.99 on Blu-ray.  It can be pre-ordered now at a reduced price of $24.99 (Blu-ray) and $19.99 (DVD) now online at PBS’ online store.

More information on this and other episodes of Nature is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://pbs.org/wnet/nature

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/PBSNature

Twitter: http://twitter.com/PBSNature

 

 

 

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Nature: Raising The Dinosaur Giant Will Be A Giant Hit With Dinosaur Lovers Of All Ages

Courtesy:  PBS/PBS Distribution

Courtesy: PBS/PBS Distribution

A few years ago, a farmer in Argentina was hunting for one of his sheep when he stumbled upon one of quite the surprising find. What the farmer found was the tip of a giant fossil bone sticking out of the ground. It was just the first of what became a massive excavation that unearthed some 200 other bones. The bones in question belonged to a group of plant-eating dinosaurs, or herbivores, that had previously been unknown. Now thanks to PBS and PBS Distribution audiences will get to learn about the find and the dinosaurs, which have yet to be named in a special new episode of its hit wildlife series Nature titled Raising The Giant Dinosaur.  The program is presented in partnership with BBC Earth.  It will be available Tuesday, April 26th.  This latest episode of Nature is a wonderful watch for audiences of all ages and interests, in both the living room and the classroom.  The central reason for this is the story at the center of the episode.  It presents the story of the dinosaur’s discovery and the process undertaken to remove its bones and reconstruct its skeleton so as to better visualize just how enormous it was.  The special effects that are used to help resurrect the creature so to speak are just as notable in the program’s overall presentation.  Audiences actually get to see the titanosaur come to life one element after another before their eyes as well as see how the dinosaur’s bones (and possibly those of other titanosurs) got to their final resting place.  Simply put, the CG is used in the utmost moderation here.  Because of this it actually adds to the program’s positives.  It is not the program’s last notable element either.  Its collective editing and pacing rounds out its presentation.  Together with the program’s central story and its minimalist use of computer graphics all three elements come together to make NatureRaising The Dinosaur Giant another impressive episode of PBS’ hit wildlife series.  They also combine to once more show why PBS remains today the very last bastion of truly worthwhile programming on television.

NatureRaising The Dinosaur Giant is yet another impressive episode of PBS’ hit wildlife series.  Yes, one would think that being about a dinosaur discovery this episode would be better suited as an episode of NOVA.  But it technically is about an animal, thus making it a fit albeit an intriguing one, for this series.  That is evident in part due to its story.  The story follows researchers’ efforts to uncover the skeleton of what is now known to be the biggest dinosaur species ever discovered to date.  Along the way host and narrator Sir David Attenborough reveals that the remains found were not just of one of the species but of at least seven separate dinosaurs, all of that same species.  He also takes viewers to a massive breeding ground for the dinosaurs, even showing respect for the creatures as he replaces a piece of egg shell that he discusses with one of the researchers studying the new species of titanosaur.  There is even a discussion during the course of the story’s presentation on how the bones ended up where they did.  It is presented in fully scientific fashion eventually coming to one final conclusion that will leave viewers just as surprised as the very revelation of the dinosaur’s size.  There is much more that could be discussed in terms of what makes the program’s story so interesting.  Viewers will be left to discover all of that remaining material for themselves when they order the DVD from PBS’ online store.  Of course it is just one part of the program that makes it well worth the watch. The program’s use of CG is just as important to note as its central story.

The story at the center of NatureRaising The Dinosaur Giant is an important part of the program’s whole.  However it isn’t the only important part of the program’s presentation.  The elements used to tell the story are just as important as the story itself.  In the case of this episode the CG elements that are used are the most notable.  The CG is used very minimally throughout the course of the episode’s roughly hour-long run time.  It is used to illustrate the theories of how the dinosaurs’ bones reached their final resting place and the sheer immensity of their nesting grounds, and most importantly to bring the dinosaur to life beyond just its skeleton.  As Attenborough discusses each aspect of the dinosaur’s makeup, a different part of it is revealed.  It starts with the dinosaur’s skeleton.  From there, Attenborough discusses the connection between the its size and its ability to pump enough blood throughout its body.  So its circulatory system is then added to the dinosaur’s skeleton.  Eventually audiences get to see the dinosaur in its full glory even to the point of seeing it with its skin, completely in tact.  Simply put those behind this episode of Nature kept its CG limited to only the important parts of the program whereas it would have been so easy to go full-on CG.  So it is nice to see that they didn’t.  That extreme moderation, when set alongside the episode’s central story, double the reason for educators and audiences in general to see this episode of Nature.  Even with the importance displayed by each element they still are not the episode’s only important elements.  The program’s collective pacing and editing combine to present the last of the program’s most important elements.

The story at the heart of Nature: Raising The Dinosaur Giant and its minimalist use of CG are both key elements in the program’s overall presentation.  While both elements are undeniably important to its presentation they are not its only important elements.  Its collective pacing and editing are just as important to the program as its story and special effects.  The program’s pacing is so important to note because the program covers so much ground (or uncovers in this case.  And, yes that bad pun as fully intended).  From figuring out how the dinosaur and its fellow titanosaurs ended up at their final resting place, to figuring out how the bones go together to figuring out the dinosaur’s diet and more there is a lot that is presented over the course of the program’s near hour-long presentation.  Thankfully the program offers just enough time to each element of the story; so much so that viewers will never feel lost.  In regards to the program’s editing, it is obvious that Attenborough covered a number of topics in each area of the program’s presentation both figuratively and literally.  Over the course of the program, it is clear in his attire that he didn’t just visit the place and record one little part.  He did a lot in terms of narration and more.  The end result, thanks to those that assembled the final product, is a presentation that moves seamlessly and fluidly from beginning to end even as each different topic is tackled.  The fashion in which the shots of Attenborough next to the dinosaur’s skeleton were edited together is just as impressive.  They fully capture the creature’s size versus that of humans.  Although, in comparison to the likes of say the diplodocus, which lived in the end of the Jurassic era, there might be some discussion there.  The largest ever found Diplodocus, which is a sauropod, just like the unnamed titanosaur was found to be roughly 171 feet long (longer than a football field) and a little more than 26 feet high.  The titanosaur found in 2014 however, was about 130 feet long and 66 feet tall.  Though, it did weigh quite a bit more—77 metric tons—than the noted biggest diplodocus ever found.  Even with this in mind, it could be argued that this titanosaur was the biggest dinosaur on earth at the time of its existence (the Cretaceous Period) but not of all time.  But that is a discussion for another time.  Getting back on the subject, just seeing its size, thanks to the work of those that edited the final project, serves to drive home just how massive the unnamed dinosaur was.  It’s just one of so many in ways in which the editing behind this episode of Nature proves to be such an enjoyable watch.  Together with the program’s pacing, its story, and its minimal use of special effects (which far too few shows across the board do) it rounds out the program’s noted positives and shows one last time just what makes it a program that is sure to impress dinosaur lovers of all ages and types.

Nature: Raising The Dinosaur Giant is a program that will impress dinosaur lovers of all ages and types.  The central story presented in this episode is one that uncovers an introduces one of the biggest dinosaurs to ever walk the earth.  And it does so in a fashion that is accessible to a wide range of viewers thanks to its topic and the approach to said topic.  The program’s minimal use of CGin comparison to the over-the-top amount used by certain other networks (which will remain unnamed here)—is just as important to the presentation.  That is because it shows the ability of those behind the program to tell an enthralling story without having to overdo it so to speak.  The collective pacing and editing incorporated into the program rounds out its positives.  Even with so much material to discuss, the pacing never leaves viewers feeling lost.  The editing does much the same.  It seamlessly ties everything together and solidifies the program’s place as one of this year’s top new documentaries.  That is the case even with the discussions that may well be raised in comparing the newly found titanosaur to other sauropods.  Nature: Raising The Dinosaur Giant will be available Tuesday, April 26th and can be ordered online direct via PBS’ online store at http://www.shoppbs.org/product/index.jsp?productId=88167686&cp=&kw=nature+raising+the+dinosaur+giant&origkw=nature+raising+the+dinosaur+giant&sr=1.  More information on this and other episodes of Nature is available online now at:

 

 

Website: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/PBSNature

Twitter: http://twitter.com/PBSNature

 

 

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PBS’ Nature Shines Again With Moose–Life Of A Twig Eater

Courtesy:  PBS/PBS Distribution

Courtesy: PBS/PBS Distribution

PBS and PBS Distribution are set to release another new episode of PBS’ hit wildlife series Nature today.  NatureMooseLife of a Twig Eater will be released today on DVD.  The latest addition to the series’ list of episodes to be released to DVD so far this year, it is another wonderful presentation showing why Nature is the top wildlife program on television today and why PBS is, once again, the last bastion of truly worthwhile programming on television today.  This is exhibited in a number of ways in this episode, not the least of which being the episode’s central story.  The story follows a group of moose in Canada and the U.S. in order to find out what might be causing the recent sharp decline in moose populations in North America .  The journey, presented firsthand by cinematographer and narrator Hugo Kitching, takes viewers along with him in Canada and with researchers in Minnesota as they follow two distinct groups of moose in their efforts to get answers.  Kitching’s narration plays its own important part in the whole of this episode, too.  It’s rare to note a narrator’s role in such a program.  But in the case of this episode, the narration is hugely important to its presentation.  Last but hardly least of note is the episode’s stunning cinematography.  Each element plays its own important part in the whole of the episodes.  Altogether they make NatureMooseLife of a Twig Eater one of 2016’s top new documentaries.

Nature: MooseLife of a Twig Eater is one more clear candidate for any critic’s list of 2016’s top new documentaries.  It is also more proof as to why Nature is television’s leading wildlife series and why PBS remains today the last bastion of truly worthwhile programming on television.  This is proven in large part by the program’s central story.  The story in question sees narrator and cinematographer Hugo Kitching following a moose and her calves in the wilds of Canada while another group of researchers follows another group of moose in Minnesota .  The story is one that for the most part is easy to take in.  There is no footage of animals mating or even animals killing one another.  That sounds minor.  But the reality is audiences see a lot of that even in any number of Nature episodes.  Luckily, again, there is none of that here  At the very worst audiences see the end result of wolves attacking one of the calves that Kitching is following.  And at another point, audiences see the Minnesota researchers having to put down a moose that has been ravaged by brain worm.  Those two moments are as difficult to see as is that of the cow (female moose are in fact called cows, believe it or not) chasing her own young out of the proverbial nest upon becoming pregnant with her next calf, only in another way.  The whole point of the story is to follow the lives of the moose in question and see if they survive the cold winter season and the first year of the calves lives.  That is all because of the rapidly declining moose population in both regions, which as viewers learn is not because of human interference but because of environmental factors.  That is one of the most intriguing pieces of information that is revealed in the program’s central story.  Instead of pointing the finger at humans, it points it squarely at extraneous, environmental causes.  That information and everything else that is shared as Kitching and the others follow their respective moose makes the program’s story one that will keep any biologist, nature lover and fan of Nature engaged in this story from beginning to end.  It is just one part of what makes this episode of Nature so enthralling.  The narration on the part of Kitching is just as important to the episode as its central story.

The central story presented in Nature: MooseLife of a Twig Eater is in its own right an important part of the program.  That is due to the unbiased information delivered over the course of its roughly hour-long run time.  That information is just one part of what makes this episode of Nature so engaging.  The narration on the part of Hugo Kitching is just as important to the program as the story and its content.  Narration usually is not something that most people would factor into a presentation such as this.  But the reality of the matter is that Kitching’s narration is in fact quite important.  That is because unlike with so many other wildlife programs and even other episodes of Nature, Kitching’s narration is so accessible even for the most casual viewer.  He speaks to viewers in a casual, conversational tone that even the most casual viewer can understand and that will in turn keep viewers just as engaged.  In the same vein, there’s no sense of pretense in his voice.  It makes his narration even more engaging, proving even more why it is such an important part of the program’s presentation.  Together with the unbiased, straight forward presentation the commentary adds another layer of enjoyment to the episode and in turn even more reason that this episode stands out so much among this year’s crop of documentaries so far.  It is not the last way in which the documentary proves itself such a standout presentation either.  The program’s cinematography is just as important as its narration and its central story.

The story that lies at the center of Nature: MooseLife of a Twig Eater and the program’s narration are both key to the episode’s overall presentation.  The story is unbiased all the way around.  There is no preachiness about human impact on the moose population.  Rather it comes across from a fully observational, unobtrusive fashion that aims to keep up with the moose in Canada and in Minnesota .  It even points out directly that the moose populations are being affected by parasites more than anything else.  Narrator/cinematographer Hugo Kitching plays his own important part in the program thanks to his unassuming, easily accessible narration.  He doesn’t come across as one of those uber-academic types at any point in his narration.  Rather he speaks in a fully simple, conversational tone that even casual audiences will enjoy and appreciate.  Even with its importance it is not the last element worth noting in this episode of Nature.  The episode’s cinematography rounds out its presentation.  And to say that its cinematography stands out is being humble.  There are stunning aerial shots of the Canadian wilderness in which Kitching is following the moose that will leave viewers breathless.  Those shots include wide shots of the region’s valleys, snow-capped mountains, and rivers captured by the program’s camera crew.  Kitching’s ground shots of the region’s forests are just as powerful.  This applies both in the winter season and spring.  The contrast of the bright, white snow to the deep hue of the evergreens and blue skies overhead in winter is something to truly behold.  In the same vein, the lush greenery of the area during spring and summer is just as rich.  Kitching is to be highly commended for his ability to so beautifully capture the beauty and majesty of the area over the course of his year there as are his fellow cinematographers.  These are just some of the examples of what makes the program’s cinematography stand out.  There are also incredible go-pro shots from Kitching as he tracks the moose that provide their own interest. The third person footage captured in Minnesota as the is just as impressive.  All in all, the camera work presented over the course of this episode of Nature proves just as invaluable to its presentation as Kitching’s simplistic narration and the episode’s fully engaging story.  When all three elements are set together they show once and for all why Nature: MooseLife of a Twig Eater is yet another enjoyable installment of PBS’ hit wildlife series.  In turn it shows why PBS remains today the last bastion of truly worthwhile programming on television.

PBS released recently released what was at the time its best episode of Nature so far this year when it released Nature: Natural Born HustlersNature’s Best Con Artists.  That episode of Nature was released just earlier this month.  Now another outstanding episode has been released in the form of Nature: MooseLife of a Twig Eater.  This episode is a great follow-up to that episode.  Between its wholly engaging story, its easily accessible narration and its breathtaking cinematography it boasts so many positives.  Even within each noted element there are plenty of smaller positives that could be noted.  And audiences will see it all for themselves when they order this episode of PBS’ hit wildlife-based series on DVD.  It is available now and can be ordered direct via PBS’ online store at http://www.shoppbs.org/product/index.jsp?productId=87689536&cp=&kw=nature+moose++life+of+a+twig+eater&origkw=Nature%3A+Moose+%C3%82%C2%96+Life+of+a+Twig+Eater+&sr=1.  Audiences can view a trailer for this episode online now via PBS’ official YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SlQbZni5Mww.

 

Courtesy:  PBS/PBS Distribution

Courtesy: PBS/PBS Distribution

 

More information on this and other episodes of Nature is available online now at:

 

 

Website: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/PBSNature

Twitter: http://twitter.com/PBSNature

 

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

PBS Goes “Giant” In A New Episode Of Nature

Courtesy:  PBS/PBS Distribution

Courtesy: PBS/PBS Distribution

A few years ago, a farmer in Argentina was hunting for one of his sheep when he stumbled upon one of quite the surprising find. What the farmer found was the tip of a giant fossil bone sticking out of the ground. It was just the first of what became a massive excavation that unearthed some 200 other bones. The bones in question belonged to a group of plant-eating dinosaurs, or herbivores, that had previously been unknown. Now thanks to PBS and PBS Distribution audiences will get to learn about the find and the dinosaurs, which have yet to be named when they release the new Nature episode Raising The Giant Dinosaur.

Nature: Raising The Giant Dinosaur will be released Tuesday, April 26th. The story presented in this episode follows host Sir David Attenborough as he takes audiences through the process of the excavation of the bones, dated by researchers at roughly 101.6 million years old. Attenborough interviews paleontologists and other scientists about the discovery and its importance to Earth’s natural history. CGI animations, 3D scans and more are used to examine the bones along the way and reveal the secrets of the dinosaurs’ lives. Attenborough is on site in this episode of Nature as a life-size skeleton of one of the dinosaurs is completed at the MEF Museum labs in Trelew, Argentina. The skeleton measures at 121 feet from head to tail. And from this revelation, it could also be determined that the largest of the dinosaurs discovered weighed in at a whopping 77 tons.

The Patagonia dig site and the MEF Museum labs are not the only places that Attenborough visits over the course of this program. He also heads roughly 500 miles north of the dig site to the site of what is believe to be the largest dinosaur nesting ground. Remnants of eggshells are scattered throughout the site. Still intact eggs have also been found at the site, preserved in mud of the old river plain. The eggs give researchers a clue as to what baby titanosaurs looked like. Research is still being conducted on the yet-to-be named dinosaur. That is because there is still much to be gleaned from the remains. Though, in what they have found, scientists can say that in the new dinosaur they have found what is the largest dinosaur ever known.

Nature: Raising The Giant Dinosaur will be released Tuesday, April 26th. It will retail for MSRP of $24.99 but can be pre-ordered at a discounted price of $19.99 via PBS’ online store at http://www.shoppbs.org/product/index.jsp?productId=88167686&cp=&kw=raising+the+giant+dinosaur&origkw=raising+the+giant+dinosaur&sr=1. Audiences can view a trailer for this episode of Nature online via PBS’ official YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ZL8af2VAtg.

 

Courtesy: PBS

Courtesy: PBS

 

More information on this and other episodes of Nature is available online now at:

 

Website: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/PBSNature

Twitter: http://twitter.com/PBSNature

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

PBS’ New Nature DVD Is One Of The Series’ Best Episodes So Far This Year

Courtesy:  PBS/PBS Distribution

Courtesy: PBS/PBS Distribution

Every year thousands of students at schools across the country are taught that humans are at the top of the evolutionary ladder. They are taught that humans sit atop that ladder because of their ability to differentiate right from wrong, to feel emotions, and so many other reasons. However anyone that has watched PBS’ hit wildlife series Nature knows that humans may very well not be the top of the evolutionary chain. Now PBS has proven this yet again with the new Nature episode Natural Born HustlersNature’s Best Con Artists. This new episode of Nature will be available on DVD tomorrow, March 8th. This episode is yet another “wildly” engaging presentation. It is another presentation that proves why Nature is television’s best wildlife series and why PBS is the last bastion of truly worthwhile programming on television. The main reason for this is the breadth of information that is shared over the course of the program’s roughly three-hour run time. Just as important to note of the program is the fact that it is clearly divided up into three separate segments. This includes not just internally but in terms of its menu, too. That will be discussed later. Last but hardly least of note in this episode of Nature is its cinematography. The venues chosen for the feature are stunning to say the least and the animals often times exotic. The way in which it was all captured makes it all worth the watch. Each element is in its own right important to the program’s overall presentation. Altogether they make Nature: Natural Born HustlersNature’s Best Con Artists one of the series’ best episodes so far this year and yet more proof of why the series is television’s best wildlife series. It also serves to once again show why PBS remains today the last bastion of truly worthwhile programming on television.

Nature: Natural Born HustlersNature’s Best Con Artists is one of the best episodes of Nature that PBS has turned out so far this year. That says quite a bit considering the quality episodes that have already been turned out so far this year. It shows this in a number of ways, the main one being the breadth of information shared throughout the episode. Over the course of its roughly three-hour run time viewers learn about the different methods that animals use for offense, defense, and for the survival of their respective next generations. Audiences will be surprised at times and shocked at others to learn about the ways in which they do that. From disruptive camouflage to sexual dimorphism (essentially the animal kingdom’s version of cross dressing, only genetically) to sleight of hand (yes, even magic so to speak) animals use a number of methods in order to survive in their given ecosystems. Audiences will be shocked to learn that some animals even resort to criminal behavior of sort in order to survive. For instance, sea otters will use what is called “ransom behavior” in order to obtain food. It is exactly what it sounds like. The males will actually kidnap young otters in order to make their mothers come for them. The mothers will then come and drop food that they have found thus allowing the males to steal said food. There is also a bird in Africa that cons other birds by acting as a watch-out for them and building their trust that viewers will learn about. Think that’s bad? Well how about kangaroos in Australia? It turns out that some kangaroos will actually resort to cheating in order to avoid conflict with larger male kangaroos. And according to the presentation, the females often even let the smaller males inseminate them. And in the realm of crustaceans apparently size does matter to some female crabs as viewers will learn. That will be left for viewers to find out for themselves along with all of the other cons that animals around the world use in order to survive. All things considered here, the cons that animals use for their survival are numerous. What’s more they show an extremely high level of intelligence; much higher than most humans might have otherwise thought. Whether one is a student of the biological sciences or just a lover of all things animals, audiences of all types will find plenty here by which to be surprised and shocked. Keeping that in mind, audiences will agree in watching this program that its wide expanse of information is more than enough reason to watch the program. It isn’t the only reason that audiences will want to see this episode of Nature, though. The program’s separation both internally and in its menu is another reason for viewers to pick up this episode of Nature.

The vast amount of information provided in Nature: Natural Born HustlersNature’s Best Con Artists is more than enough reason for audiences to see this episode of Nature. It is hardly the only reason for audiences to add this episode to their home DVD libraries. The program’s segmentation both internally and externally it is separated out rather than presented as one extended three-hour episode. The first segment presents the cons that animals use in order to evade predators. The second turns the tables and shows how predators fool their prey. The third and final segment shows the cons that animals use in order to ensure the survival of the next generation of their species. Audiences will be glad to know that should they start on the first or second segment neither segment will auto run the next segment once it is over. This is helpful for audiences whether in a classroom setting or a living room. It gives each segment a fully defined start and end versus leaving audiences feeling that they will miss anything in those programs that run continuously. Said programs do sadly exit. And audiences will agree just how aggravating said programs can be because of that continuous structure. What’s more narrator Kevin Draine gives a clear transition at the end of all three programs, setting up the second and third segments clearly and even rounding out everything at the end of the episode’s final segment. Some will take this aspect of the program for granted. But in the grand scheme of things such clear and precise separation of segments both internally and externally makes for a viewing experience that is certain to keep viewers engaged from beginning to end of each segment. It is one more way in which this episode of Nature proves itself to be one of the series’ best episodes so far this year and why, again, PBS is the last bastion of truly worthwhile programming on television.

Both the information presented in Nature: Natural Born HustlersNature’s Best Con Artists and the episode’s structure are key to its overall presentation. Both play their own important part in ensuring that audiences will remain fully engaged in the program from one segment to the next. Of course they are not the only elements that make this episode such a hit for the series and for PBS. The program’s cinematography rounds out its most notable elements. Over the course of the program’s three-hour run time audiences are taken from the cities of North America to the jungles of South America and even to different African countries well beyond. It takes audiences to nearly every corner of the globe, even beneath the waves of the Great Barrier Reef to examine how sharks use camouflage to hunt their prey. Each journey presents beautiful footage of the presented regions. There are stunning aerial shots that take viewers over waterfalls and jungles at some points. At others audiences are presented with equally breathtaking undersea footage of different aquatic ecosystems and back on land of the African plains just to name a few examples. Regardless of which region and ecosystem is displayed it can be said that those behind the lens captured footage that will leave viewers transfixed thanks to the rich colors of the given regions and the equally powerful juxtapositions of the animals to their surroundings. That is just the tip of the iceberg, too. The footage of the animals themselves is just as impressive. Audiences actually get to get up close to a lizard to discover how it keeps itself from casting a shadow in order to hide itself from predators in one segment. In another audiences actually get to stand (figuratively speaking) along with researchers as they watch how capuchin monkeys react to the sound of invaders. And as it sits, waiting to strike its prey viewers even get to see an orchid mantis at work. These are just a few more examples of how this episode of Nature’s cinematography plays a role in the episode’s overall presentation. It is an important part, too needless to say. It also rounds out the episode’s most important elements. Together with the program’s broad swath of information and its clear and precise segmentation, all three elements work together to show yet again why this episode of Nature is one of its best episodes so far this year. They also work together to prove yet again why PBS is the last bastion of truly worthwhile programming on television.

Nature: Natural Born HustlersNature’s Best Con Artists is one of the best episodes of Nature’s best episodes to be turned out so far this year. This is thanks in large part to the breadth of its sometimes surprising and sometimes shocking information about animal behaviors. The information in question shows that despite what people want to think humans might not be the top of the evolutionary ladder. That is because their cons show quite a bit of intelligence—an almost human level intelligence (not always for good, either). It is something that will most certainly keep viewers engaged from beginning to end. The program’s segmentation both internally and externally is just as important to its presentation. They are clear and precise both within the episode and in the episode’s menu and in turn are just as certain to keep viewers fully engaged. The program’s cinematography rounds out its presentation. Between the footage of the different ecosystems and the animals that inhabit said ecosystems, those behind the lens are to be hugely applauded for their work. If for no other reason than the cinematography audiences will want to see this three-part episode of Nature. Each element, as it can be seen now, plays its own important part in the presentation of Nature: Natural Born HustlersNature’s Best Con Artists. Altogether they make Nature: Natural Born HustlersNature’s Best Con Artists one of the best episode of Nature to be turned out so far this year and even more proof of why PBS remains the last bastion of truly worthwhile programming on television today. It will be available Tuesday, March 8th and can be ordered direct online via PBS’ online store at http://www.shoppbs.org/product/index.jsp?productId=85258466&cp=&kw=nature+natural+born+hustlers&origkw=nature+natural+born+hustlers&sr=1. More information on this and other episodes of Nature is available online now at:

 

Website: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/PBSNature

Twitter: http://twitter.com/PBSNature

 

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PBS Announces Release Date For New Episode Of Nature

Courtesy:  PBS/PBS Distribution

Courtesy: PBS/PBS Distribution

PBS and PBS Distribution have announced they will release another new episode of PBS’ hit wildlife series Nature next month.

Nature: Moose Life of a Twig Eater will be released Tuesday, March 22nd.  The hour-long program will be available exclusively on DVD and will retail for MSRP of $24.99.  It follows cameraman and naturalist Hugo Kitching as he spends a year in the wilderness with moose populations.  He does so in order to try and uncover the source of an uncommonly high mortality rate among juvenile moose.  His time is spent largely in Jasper National Park in Alberta, Canada.  Along with his work following a young mother moose and its calf, the program also covers work being done in Grand Portage, MN where the moose population has declined by some sixty-four percent since 1990.  Viewers will see researchers capture young calves just long enough to collect blood samples and put tracking collars on them so as to get answers about their population decline.  Current results have shown that brainworm and winter ticks are two of the leading causes behind the decline.  There are other causes that are discussed at more length in the program.  Audiences can view a trailer for this episode of Nature online now via YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SlQbZni5Mww.

 

Courtesy:  PBS/PBS Distribution

Courtesy: PBS/PBS Distribution

 

Nature: Moose Life of a Twig Eater will be released Tuesday, March 22nd.  It will retail for MSRP of $24.99 but can be ordered at a discounted price of $19.99 via PBS’ online store at http://www.shoppbs.org/product/index.jsp?productId=87689536&cp=&kw=nature+moose++life+of+a+twig+eater&origkw=Nature%3A+Moose+%C3%82%C2%96+Life+of+a+Twig+Eater+&sr=1.  More information on this and other episodes of Nature is available online now at:

 

 

Website: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/PBSNature

 

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Soul Of The Elephant Is An “Unforgettable” Episode Of PBS’ Nature

Courtesy:  PBS/PBS Distribution

Courtesy: PBS/PBS Distribution

The elephant is one of nature’s most amazing and majestic creatures.  For eons elephants and their mammoth ancestors have roamed the planet.  Sadly the number of elephants around the world has been dramatically impacted throughout the ages because of poaching and other human activity.  From Africa to Asia elephants’ numbers over the past half century or so have been decimated.  However in recent years efforts to protect elephants have proven at least somewhat fruitful in at least some regions of the world.  One of those regions—Botswana—has the highest population of elephants in Africa thanks to efforts taken to protect them.  Now thanks to PBS’ partnering with filmmakers Dereck and Beverly Joubert audiences get to see the effects of those efforts in Nature: Soul of the Elephant.  Released late last November this nearly hour-long episode of PBS’ hit wildlife series takes audiences along for a ride with the Jouberts as they follow a group of elephants in its journey along one of the country’s major rivers.  The program itself lies at the core of the program.  That is thanks in large part to the program’s overall content.  There is quite a bit to say here so that will be discussed more extensively shortly.  The program’s cinematography is just as pivotal to its enjoyment as its overall story.  That will be discussed at more length a bit later.  Last but hardly least of note in this program is its collective editing and pacing.  While the elephants’ journey and their own gait may be slow, the pacing moves just fast enough to keep viewers engaged and moved.  That is thanks at least in some part to the episode’s editing.  It rounds out the program’s most important elements.  Together with the previously noted elements, all three make Nature: Soul of the Elephant one of the best episodes of Nature that PBS has turned out in recent memory.

Nature: Soul of the Elephant is one of the best episodes of Nature that PBS has turned out in recent memory.  It is yet more proof of why the network remains today the last bastion of truly worthwhile programming on television.  This is exhibited centrally through the episode’s main “story.”  The story in question follows filmmakers Dereck and Beverly Joubert as the couple joins a group of elephants on its migratory path along one of Botswana’s major rivers.  Audiences will be amazed at the change in attitude toward the Jouberts by the elephants as the couple slowly paddles down the river alongside group.  At first the elephants are anything but happy about the Jouberts being in their presence.  They are even charged a number of times by bull elephants in the herd.  Yet as the elephants’ journey continues they become increasingly welcoming of the couple, even allowing Dereck Joubert to get quite close to them at one point in order to record them.  It really is an intriguing process to behold.  That is because it is just one way in which the elephants display their high level of intelligence in this episode of Nature.  Audiences also see something truly extraordinary in the elephants’ journey as they mourn for elephants that had died long ago.  This is exhibited as they pass by the skeletal remains of different elephants.  The elephants’ body language clearly displays a mourning behavior on the part of the elephants that pass by the remains.  It is an incredible sight to behold.  Yet again here audiences see in this episode of Nature a truly high level of intelligence and even emotional comprehension rarely seen in the animal kingdom.  The reverence that the elephants display towards the remains of their own is just jaw dropping even for those that have perhaps seen such behavior before.  Once again it exhibits just how little we as humans know about other animals, especially the gentle giants that elephants prove to be here.  There are at least two more behaviors exhibited by the elephants in this program that will surprise audiences.  They will be left for audiences to see for themselves when they order this episode of Nature.  On a related note, many of the behavioral exhibitions displayed in this program are thanks in large part to the program’s cinematography.  It is another important element that plays into the episode’s success.

The “story” at the center of Nature: Soul of the Elephant is a hugely important part of the program’s overall presentation.  That is because of both the information shared throughout the course of its nearly hour-long run time, and the collective depth and impact of said information.  They work together to make this episode of Nature one of the series’ best in recent memory.  As important as the story proves to be to the program’s presentation it is just one important part of the episode’s whole.  The cinematography is directly linked to the program’s information because the cinematography is the reason that audiences are able to capture some of the elephants’ eye-opening behaviors.  In the same vein, there is other footage captured by those that came along with the Jouberts that are impressive in their own right.  One of those moments comes as the couple is flying over the African plains to its destination.  Their plane is filmed from above.  In capturing the plane flying below, the beauty of the land and waters below is captured, too.  It is a truly beautiful sight that must be seen in order to be fully appreciated.  In regards to the footage captured by the Jouberts the elephants’ growing acceptance of the couple allows for some equally incredible footage.  That footage includes that of the elephants as they mourn one of their own, long dead during their journey.  The couple is able to get a camera right up with the skull of the elephant that captures the elephants’ reverence for the long-deceased animal.  It is such a touching yet heartbreaking moment that is certain to move any viewer just because of how close audiences get.  In another moment, the elephants are so comfortable with the couple that Dereck is able to hold his (obviously waterproof) camera at the waterline and capture the elephants as they make their way through one of the many bodies of water that they encounter on their journey.  It is the kind of shot that has rarely been presented in any previous episode of Nature. And it is just one more of so many shots throughout the program that makes it such a moving and powerful presentation. There is so much more footage that could be discussed as examples of what makes the cinematography so important in this episode of Nature. Simply put, the cinematography displayed in this episode of Nature, while not entirely unlike that of other episodes of PBS’ wildlife series, does still stand tall among the extensive list of episodes that has come before because of its cinematography. It really tells the Jouberts’ story in a way that really immerses audiences into the presentation at a level that few other episodes do and have done. That being the case it shows exactly why the cinematography is just as important to Soul of the Elephant as the episode’s central “story.”   It still is not the finishing touch to this standout episode of Nature. The episode’s combined editing and pacing round out its most important elements.

Both the “story” at the heart of Nature: Soul of the Elephant and its cinematography are important in their own right to the episode’s overall presentation. While both elements are equally important in their own right to the episode’s presentation, one would be remiss to ignore the program’s combined editing and pacing. Whether the final edit was done by the Jouberts or by someone else (or potentially by both parties) the end result is a presentation that expertly captures elephants’ journey and the respect that the Jouberts had for their subjects. What’s more it does just as much of an expert job of capturing the expansive journey that the elephants undertake. It also serves to really drive home the cinematography’s emotional impact. Keeping all of this in mind, everything is all edited so well together that while the elephants’ journey is a long one, it is one that feels like it flies right by but in the best possible manner. In other words thanks to the editing, the program’s pacing will keep audiences fully engaged and immersed from the beginning of the elephants’ journey to its end. The program’s pacing coupled with its deeply moving and insightful “story” and cinematography ensures this even more. In the end all three elements come together to present Nature: Soul of the Elephant as one of PBS’ best episodes of Nature in recent memory and one that audiences likely won’t forget after watching it.

Nature: Soul of the Elephant is one of the best episodes of PBS’ wildlife series to be turned out in recent memory. It is one that after watching it, audiences likely won’t forget anytime soon. That is thanks in large part to the “story” at the heart of the episode. The cinematography is directly linked in to the story as it actually helps tell the story and give the story real depth and emotion. The combined editing and pacing behind the presentation makes it whole. It ties the whole thing together and ensures that audiences will remained fully immersed and engaged in the elephants’ story from beginning to end. In watching it so intently audiences will agree that this program is indeed one of Nature’s best episodes in recent memory and an episode that they will not soon forget. It is available now and can be ordered direct via PBS’ online store at http://www.shoppbs.org/product/index.jsp?productId=71368906&cp=&kw=soul+of+the+elephant&origkw=Soul+of+the+elephant&sr=1. More information on this and other episodes of Nature is available online now at:

 

Website: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/PBSNature

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.