PBS Distribution To Release New ‘Berenstain Bears’ Collection Next Week

Courtesy: PBS Distribution

PBS Distribution will release another collection of episodes from The Berenstain Bears to audiences next week.

The Berenstain BearsTree House Tales Volume 3 is scheduled for release May 19.  The latest collection features 28 more episodes from the animated series and will retail for MSRP of $14.99.  Among the most notable episodes is “Car Trip,” in which brother and sister learn that the family’s vacation will not take it to Grizzyland, but somewhere else.

Another notable addition to this latest collection comes in the form of “The Giddy Grandma.”  Sister is writing about a bear that she admires in this episode, and learns Grizzly Gran had a lot of accolades during her life.

“Moving Day’ tackles an issue that so many children (and families) face when brother and sister’s friends are moving away.The  siblings learn that people moving is not entirely bad.

More information on The Berenstain BearsTree House Tales Volume 3 is available along with all of the latest Berenstain Bears news at:

 

Website: http://www.berenstainbears.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/berenstainbears

Twitter: http://twitter.com/TheBerenstains

 

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‘Okavango — River of Dreams’ Is The Best Episode Of PBS’ Series ‘Nature’ So Far This Year

Courtesy: PBS/PBS Distribution/WNET

The Okavango River is one of Africa’s most important and one of the world’s most important and awe-inspiring bodies of water.  Instead of flowing out into the ocean, the river flows inland through Botswana and toward the Kalahari Desert.  The river creates a virtual paradise for the animals that live in the desert’s hostile environment while also being a virtual Eden in its source and its delta.  Now thanks to PBS Distribution, audiences can take a journey along the river with the animals that migrate along its length and that call the river home in the new episode Okavango: River of Dreams.  The nearly three hour documentary, released Jan. 7, is an engaging and entertaining presentation in part due to the information that is featured throughout its three segments.  That information will be discussed shortly.  Speaking of the segments, the fact that the two-hour, forty-minute program is presented in three separate segments is another key aspect to its presentation.  It will be discussed a little later.  The cinematography featured in this episode of Nature is also worth noting, and will also be addressed later.  Each item noted here is key in its own way to the whole of this program.  All things considered, they make it one of the year’s best new documentaries even despite the unnecessary preachy pro-conservation message featured in the episode’s finale.

OkavangoRiver of Dreams is an awe-inspiring presentation that is among the best new Nature episodes released so far this year and among the best new overall documentaries so far this year.  That is proven in part through the story at its center.  The story in question is that of the Okavango River, and its role as the center of a much larger ecosystem.  Audiences will remain engaged and entertained as they watch the river course its way from its source, into its delta and into the dry, arid desert land where it ends, at least until rains fall to give those lands new life.  Learning of the role that elephants play in the river’s course and even that some seemingly natural foes – hyenas and warthogs – actually find some moments in which they live peacefully at times is enlightening.  Seeing the lengths that some animals go to for survival at the far, drier end of the river is just as enlightening, as those behaviors prove to be quite similar to human behaviors, in terms of survival of the fittest.  Simply watching the interactions of the overall ecosystem of the Okavango River is in itself enlightening. From the hierarchies of the cat families (lions and leopards) to the influence of elephants on the whole of the ecosystem to the sheer vast number of species is another key portion of the program’s informational aspect.  Between all of this and so much more, the general content of this episode of Nature gives audiences so much to appreciate.

While the content featured throughout the course of Okavango River of Dreams does a lot to make this episode engaging and entertaining, it is just one of the presentation’s important elements.  The fact that the nearly three-hour program is broken up into segments ensures even more, audiences’ engagement and entertainment.  The program is broken up into three distinct segments – “Paradise,” “Limbo,” and “Inferno” – a la Dante’s epic poem.  The whole thing starts at the best point in the river’s extension, “Paradise.”  As the rive flows through the African continent, resources begin to become less, leading to more competition for resources and survival.  That moment is “Limbo.”  The river’s end near the Kalahari Desert is the “Inferno.”  It is the harshest point for all of the creatures that rely on the river for life.  The far southern end of the river is a point at which the water becomes far less available for creatures above and below the waves.  Each segment has a distinct beginning, middle and end.  Viewers are not forced to sit through the story in one whole watch.  This is important to note because in segmenting the story, it allows viewers to take the story at their own pace.  That ability to take in the story of the river and its ecosystem ensures even more, that audiences will be more focused and in turn engaged as they watch each segment.  So while this might not seem all that important on the surface, it is of great importance in the bigger picture.  What’s more, the pacing within each segment partners with that segmentation to add even more certainty that audiences will remain engaged and entertained throughout the program overall.  Keeping in mind the impact of the episode’s pacing and segmentation along with the general content, the whole of this presentation is even stronger.  They are not the program’s only key elements.  The cinematography featured throughout the episode puts the finishing touch to its whole.

The cinematography that is featured throughout the course of OkavangoRiver of Dreams is award-worthy to say the absolute least.  Whether it be the aerial shots from high above the African continent, the close ups of animals wading through the river’s waters, the creatures of the deep (so to speak) who live in the river or even the smooth, seamless shots of the river that flow just as smoothly as the river itself, every one of those shots does its own part to keep viewers engaged and entertained, too.  The program may be presented on DVD, but the footage is so rich and full of life and color, as if it was shot in high definition.  Whether watching the flamingos take to the skies in “Inferno,” the elephants make their way along the river in all three segments and big cats working to survive all along the river while also training their cubs, audiences are given the best seat in the house while feeling like there are immersed in the program thanks to the cinematography.  The blue skies set against the dry, cracked ground at the river’s end creates such a stark contrast that creates its own powerful impact for audiences.  The slow motion shots of gazelles bounding through the river’s waters is moving in its own way, too.  Simply put, the cinematography featured throughout the course of this episode of Nature is just as important to its presentation as the episode’s primary content and its segmentation.  When all three elements are considered together, the whole of those elements makes this presentation a work that is the best episode of PBS’ Nature so far this year and one of the year’s top new documentaries so far, too.  That is even despite the inclusion of the completely unnecessary preachy pro-conservationist message pushed at the finale of the program and also the equally confusing inclusion of Marilyn Manson’s cover of The Eurythmics’ ‘Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)’ at the beginning and end of each segment.  Yes, it actually incorporates Marilyn Manson into its whole.  Again, even with this in mind, the program in whole is still worth the watch.

PBS’ presentation of Nature: OkavangoRiver of Dreams is one of the best of the series’ episodes so far this year and easily and one of the year’s top new documentaries.  That is evidenced in part through the general content that makes up the body of the episode.  It is rich in its own right, as has been pointed out here.  The fact that the nearly three-hour program is separated into three distinct segments will encourage audiences to watch the program in whole, and in turn ensure even more, audiences will remain engaged and entertained.  The cinematography featured throughout the program round out its most important elements.  The only real negatives to the whole are the fact that once again, that unnecessary preachy pro-conservationist message is there and the inclusion of Marilyn Manson’s cover of The Eurythmics’ ‘Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This).’  One can’t even begin to figure out what necessity had for the program.  That was just a poor choice as there is no connection between that song and this program in terms of content.  What’s more, audiences who watch Nature know that we need to care for planet Earth and all of its ecosystems.  We do not need to be preached at time and again.  The people behind Nature have got to get this through their heads and stop letting that preaching get into every episode.  Save the preaching for one episode of the program.  People watch this show to learn and to be entertained, not to be preached at.  Now, getting back on track, even despite the two noted negatives, this program still boasts so much to its positive that it is still well worth the watch time and again.  It is available now on DVD.  More information on this and other episodes of Naure is available online at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/PBSNature

Twitter: http://twitter.com/PBSNature

 

 

 

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‘Nature: Bears’ Largely Successful In Its Presentation Of The World’s Different Species Of Bears

Courtesy: PBS/PBS Distribution/WNET

PBS’ popular wildlife series Nature has, over the years, brought audiences countless hours of educational and entertaining content about animals and ecosystems from around the world.  From the plains of Africa to the waters of the Great Barrier Reef to the highest peaks of the Andes, the series has done so much for audiences.  Now with a mutated flu running rampant around the globe and causing so much unnecessary fear, panic and closures, the program is needed more than ever.  That is because even zoos, where people might otherwise be able to be exposed to many of those animals and ecosystems, are among the many places closed as a result of that unnecessary fear and panic.  So where else to be exposed to nature and wildlife in general than in PBS’ long-running series?  In one of its most recently released episodes, Bears, the program takes a look at the different species of bears that roam the world.  The surprising revelations about the different species form a strong foundation for the program.  It will be discussed shortly.  While that engaging content does a lot to help this episode of Nature, it should be noted that there is one negative to the whole.  That one negative is once again, is the preachy message about conservation pushed into the program’s final minutes.  This is not the first time that this has happened with an episode of Nature, and is something that needs to stop.  It will be addressed a little later.  Getting back to the positive, the program’s collective pacing and transitions round out its most important elements.  They work with the episode’s content and makes it well worth watching even despite the unnecessary preaching pushed into the episode’s final moments.  Keeping that in mind, Nature: Bears proves to be another overall positive episode of Nature.

Nature: Bears, one of the latest releases from PBS’ popular wildlife series Nature, is a welcome presentation for audiences everywhere in a time when panic and fear over COVID-19 has caused so much unnecessary closure nationwide.  It serves to expose audiences to a variety of bears that they otherwise might not have been exposed to at the zoos and other wildlife facilities that are now closed.  That introduction to the different species forms the program’s foundation.  Audiences are introduced to familiar bear species, such as black bears, grizzly bears and polar bears over the roughly hour-long episode as well as perhaps less familiar species, such as the sloth bear and the spectacled bear.  Not only are viewers introduced to all of those species of bears, but they are also introduced to the things that make each bear unique.  For instance, viewers learn that the polar bear’s sense of smell is 20 times stronger than that of a bloodhound, and that it can smell its prey as deep as three feet beneath the ice.  Also of interest in the program is the revelation that the sloth bear is able to avoid the pain of solder termites’ pincers when it breaks down termite colonies because of the construction of the bear’s mouth.  In regard to the grizzly bears, viewers learn that they learn through what is essentially modeling.  The cubs learn how to hunt for fish, for instance, by watching their mother.  That is very similar throughout the animal kingdom.  On another note, audiences also learn in watching the program that bears scratch their backs on trees, not because their backs itch, but because of territorial marking.  So, as funny as it is to watch, it actually serves a key purpose in the lives of bears.  All of this is just a snapshot of everything that is discussed throughout the course of Bears.  When it is considered along with the content that was note addressed here, the whole of the program’s main feature proves to be worthwhile presentation for audiences of all ages.  Even when the discussions on bears mating and hunting come up, the content is largely edited, so viewers don’t have to worry about covering their children’s eyes or fast forwarding at any point.  To that end, it makes the program that much more accessible for viewers.  All things considered, the content featured in Nature: Bears builds a strong foundation for this program.  Of course for all of the positives presented through the DVD’s content, it is difficult to ignore its one negative element, the unnecessary preaching about conservation at the program’s end.

As Nature: Bears nears its end, narrator Olga Merediz begins reading lines that make statements about the danger that many bears are in, such as the polar bear because of global warming.  At another point prior, she reads a message about how deforestation endangered panda bears in Asia.  Yes, we know global warming is a problem.  There is no denying it.  There is also no denying that deforestation globally is a problem.  However, being that the rest of the program did so much to educate and entertain, having that element to close out was not necessary.  It ruins an otherwise enjoyable program because of its preachy nature.  Please do not misunderstand the statement being made here.  There is no doubt that global warming should be addressed.  There is no doubt that the deforestation that nearly wiped out the panda bears is still very much of concern.  However, as important as they are, there is a time and place for everything, and a program that is otherwise presented solely as an educational piece does not need to include preachy messages about environmentalism at any point.  That should be saved for another time and perhaps another episode of Nature that is dedicated entirely to the issue facing the planet. For an episode that is supposed to focus on animals, that preachiness should not be there.  This is not the first time that this has happened in an episode of Nature, and likely isn’t the last either.  Hopefully though, the people at PBS will take this into consideration for future episodes of Nature.  Now as much of a detriment as that preachiness is to this episode of Nature, it doesn’t make the program unwatchable.  The collective pacing and transitions that are used throughout the program make the primary content even more engaging.

The pacing and transitions that are used throughout the course of Nature: Bears is so important because it is these elements that keep the program flowing from start to end.  Considering the number of species of bear featured throughout the program and what makes each species unique from one another, there is clearly a lot of content presented.  Just enough time was given to each species and its abilities and adaptations from one to the next.  As each species’ focus gives way to focus on other species around the world, the transitions are seamless.  Audiences are never left behind and are never left feeling like the transitions are stark.  Everything is fluid throughout the program.  That fluidity and the steady pacing ensures that audiences will be largely, if not fully, engaged in this episode of Nature from start to end.  When this is taken into account with the power of the program’s content, that certainty of engagement and entertainment is strengthened even more.  That is even despite the one issue of the unnecessary environmentalist message pushed so hard in the program’s final moments.  Keeping that in mind, Nature: Bears proves itself another largely positive episode of what is one of PBS’ most notable series.

Nature: Bears, released on DVD Jan. 28, is another largely positive presentation from PBS’ long-running wildlife series.  It takes viewers around the world, profiling various species of bear and their unique adaptations and abilities.  Along the way, its pacing and transitions do a lot to make even more certain that viewers will remain engaged and entertained.  Even with the unnecessary environmentalist preaching at the episode’s end, those positives still make the program largely a positive presentation.  It is available now.  More information on this and other episodes of Nature is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/PBSNature

Twitter: http://twitter.com/PBSNature

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Every Family Will Welcome The Berenstain Bears’ Second Season Set Into Their Own Houses

Courtesy: PBS Distribution/PBS/PBS Kids

The Berenstain Bears have, for decades, entertained and educated adults and children of all ages.  Between the countless books that have been released, the short-lived animated series from 1985 (which is available now in full on DVD) and the 2003 series, which ran for three seasons, families across the nation (and world) have come to love Papa, Mama, Brother and Sister, their stories and life lessons.  This spring, that enjoyment will continue when PBS Distribution releases the third collection of episodes from the 2003 series on DVD.  The two-disc set is scheduled for release May 19.  While audience await the arrival of that collection, they have the second collection, released Jan. 28, to enjoy.  The Berenstain Bears: Tree House Tales Volume 2 is a wonderful collection that every family will enjoy partly because of its featured stories, which will be discussed shortly.  The lessons tied to the stories add even more to the set’s enjoyment and will be discussed a little later.  Keeping in mind the value of the set’s collective primary and secondary content, the whole of The Berenstain Bears: Tree House Tales Volume 2 boasts an average price point, that is notable in its own right.  Each item noted here is important in its own right to the whole of the double-disc set.  All things considered, they make the collection a presentation that is one of this year’s top new family DVD/BD box sets.

The Berenstain Bears: Tree House Tales Volume 2 is a wonderful presentation that families everywhere will welcome in their own houses.  That is due in part to the stories that are featured in this set.  Approximately 26 stories make up the body of the two-disc collection.  Those stories are in fact the whole of the series’ second season.  They are presented in the exact same chronological order in which they originally aired, too, from July 14, 2003 and July 30, 2003.  Keeping this in mind, it is a bit of a headscratcher as to why this collection wasn’t just called “Season Two” instead of “Volume Two.”  Using the title “Volume Two” becomes somewhat misleading, considering that said term “volume” is typically used for compilation sets rather than full season sets.  The same approach was used in the series’ debut “volume,” which was released Sept. 17.  The stories themselves find the Bear family – Papa, Mama, Sister and Brother – dealing with a variety of very real life situations, making them relatable to audiences of all ages.  The story at the center of “Too Much Pressure,” for instance, finds the Bear family trying to figure out its overly-crowded weekly schedule.  What family out there doesn’t deal with that issue?  Exactly.  The season’s opener, ‘The Excuse Note’ is something that, again, audiences of all ages can appreciate because we have all been there.  Sister tries to lie to get out of gym class because she doesn’t enjoy it.  This is also a plot element that has been used multiple times before and since this episode’s airing.  We’ve all tried to figure out ways out of things we don’t want to do, which is ties to the story’s lesson.  This will be addressed a little later.  Getting back on topic, “The Perfect Fishing Spot” finds Papa and Sister heading out to get the perfect fish for a special dinner.  This leads to another key lesson that is featured within the season.  Between these and so many other stories featured in the second season of The Berenstain Bears, the stories that make up the series’ second season give audiences more than enough reason to bring this set home.

The stories that make up the body of The Berenstain Bears’ second season go a long way toward making this collection worth owning for any family.  They are just one key aspect of the set that makes its presentation so appealing.  The lessons that are tied into each story are themselves critical to the set’s presentation, too.  As noted already, Papa learns his own valuable lesson in “The Perfect Fishing Spot” He learns that the biggest prize isn’t the best and that he needs to make sure he keeps his focus when he says he is doing something for someone else.  This is something with which we all deal with all the time.  We start out wanting to do something nice for someone else, but somewhere along the line, we end up losing that focus and start focusing on what we want.  That is what happens here with Papa.  He admits in the end that is what has happened as he tries to get the biggest fish possible for the grandparents’ special dinner.  He admits he started trying to find the perfect fishing spot (and fish) more for himself than for them.  It takes Sister reminding Papa for him to realize what he was doing.  The lesson that Papa learns is not the only one involving priorities.  He also learns what happens when he puts winning over friendship in “The Prize Pumpkin.”  That lesson is one to which audiences of all ages can relate.

Papa isn’t the only member of the Bear family to learn some valuable lessons this season.  Brother and Sister learn a lesson about friendship in “Ferdy Factual.”  The duo leans that some people deal with their feelings in different ways and don’t always mean to act rude to others.  It’s just that they struggle to come to terms with their discomfort in certain situations.  Dealing with that issue is just a matter of being nice to those people and maybe they will open up and be nicer.  The cubs also learn in this season, the invaluable lesson that helping others can actually help one feel very good inside.  That lesson comes in two different episodes – “Lend A Helping Hand” and “Nothing To Do.”  The whole family leans an equally invaluable lesson in “Too Much Pressure” about the importance of setting limits and priorities in life, not just in terms of setting weekly schedules, in “Too Much Pressure.”  It’s yet another key lesson that will always be timely and relatable.  Considering the importance of that lesson, those featured in the other noted episodes and in the rest of the season’s episodes, it becomes clear why the lessons featured in this season are just as important to its presentation as the stories to which they are tied.  Keeping that in mind, it becomes clear that the primary and secondary content featured in this collection does a lot to make the set well worth owning.  It also makes the set’s average price point money well spent.

The average price point for The Berenstain Bears: Tree House Tales Volume 2 is $11.65.  That price is reached by averaging prices at Amazon, Walmart, Target, Best Buy, Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Books-A-Million and PBS’ online store.  None of the set’s price even reaches $15, and the least expensive of the listings is at Target — $8.69 – while the most expensive of the listings is at Books-A-Million and at PBS’ store, at $14.99.   Walmart’s listing of $8.77 makes a good middle ground.  The $9.99 listing at Amazon and Best Buy are easy on the bank account, too.  Even if audiences choose PBS’ store or Barnes & Noble Booksellers, they still won’t break the bank.  That is the most important thing to consider here.  Regardless of which route audiences go, the price is anything but prohibitive.  It is a price that is accessible for every consumer.  Keeping this in mind, the affordable price point of this set and its primary and secondary content makes this second season set from The Berenstain Bears another welcome addition to any home.

PBS Distribution’s latest Berenstain Bears season collection is a presentation that every family will happily welcome in their own houses.  That is due to the set’s stories and their related lessons, which are all timeless in their own right.  The set’s affordable average price point makes that set that much more appealing.  Neither the set’s average price point, nor its singular prices are price prohibitive.  The most expensive listing from the major retailers is $14.99, which is relatively affordable for anyone.  Keeping all of this in mind, The Berenstain Bears: Tree House Tales Volume Two is a presentation that deserves to be in any family’s house.  More information on this DVD, PBS distribution’s upcoming release of Tree House Tales Volume Three and all of the latest Berenstain Bears news is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.berenstainbears.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/berenstainbears

Twitter: http://twitter.com/TheBerenstains

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

PBS Distribution Announces Release Date For New ‘Berenstain Bears’ Collection

Courtesy: PBS Distribution/PBS/PBS Kids

PBS Distribution will release a new collection of episodes from The Berenstain Bears animated series later this month.

The Berenstain Bears: Tree House Tales Volume Two is scheduled for release Jan. 28 on DVD. The two-disc collection features 26 episodes from the series that teach lots of family values.  One episodes features Sister being picked to represent her school in a jump rope contest.  Papa’s friendship with his longtime friend Farmer Ben is tested when a pumpkin growing contest is announced.

In one of the set’s non-contest episodes, Brother teams up with Freddy to create a flying device for their fifth grade science contest.  The episode teaches lessons about teamwork and communication, just come of the lessons featured throughout the course of the collection.

The Berenstain BearsTree House Tales Volume Two runs a total of 340 minutes (just over five hours).  It will retail for MSRP of $14.99.  It can be ordered online through PBS’ online store.

More information on this and other Berenstain Bears collections is available online at:

 

Website: http://www.berenstainbears.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/berenstainbears

Twitter: http://twitter.com/TheBerenstains

 

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phi’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

PBS Delves Into The Realm Of Bears In New ‘Nature’ Episode

Courtesy: PBS/PBS Distribution/WNET

Bears are among the world’s most awe-inspiring creatures.  From the powerful grizzly bear, to the sloth bear to the polar and panda bears and beyond, bears are key to so many ecosystems around the world. Now later this month, PBS Distribution will present a new profile of the world’s various bear species in the apty titled Nature episode Bears.

NatureBears is  scheduled for release Jan. 28 on DVD and digital.  The hour-long program does more than just profile bears and the adaptations the help them survive.  It also examines the impact of humans on that ability to survive.

The trailer for the program is streaming online here.  The DVD will retail for MSRP of $24.99, but can be ordered at a reduced price of $19.99 through PBS’ online store.

More information on this and other episodes of Nature is available at:

 

Website: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature

 

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/PBSNature

Twitter: http://twitter.com/PBSNature

 

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

PBS Releases Another New Engineering Documentary In New ‘NOVA’ Episode

Courtesy: PBS/PBS Distribution/WGBH

PBS is renewing its focus on the topic of engineering in a newly released episode of NOVA.

NOVAWhy Bridges Collapse is available now on DVD and digital.  The program opens with the story of the collapse of the Morandi Bridge in Genoa, Italy in Aug. 2018.  The collapse led to the death of 43 people.

From that point, the program delves into the world of engineering and what may have led to the collapse of the bridge, which had stood for half a century.  It compares that bridge’s failure to the collapses over the years of similar structures in West Virginia — the Silver Bridge over the Ohio River — and in Minnesota — the I-35W Bridge — in an effort to find out what can and should be done in the future to ensure such disasters no longer happen.

NOVAWhy Bridges Collapse is retailing for MSRP of $24.99, but can be ordered at a reduced price of $19.99 through PBS’ online store.

More information on this and other episodes of NOVA is available online at:

 

Website: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NOVApbs

Twitter: http://twitter.com/novapbs

 

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.