Kulick’s New EP Is A Welcome Companion Piece To His Latest LP

Courtesy: ENCI Records

Independent singer-songwriter Kulick’s latest album, Yelling in a Quiet Neighborhood is getting new life of sorts.  Kulick (a.k.a. Jacob Kulick) re-visited the record in his new EP, Sitting in a Quiet Coffeehouse.The five-song collection was released Friday through ENCI Records features stripped down, acoustic takes of five songs from the album, three of which are singles produced from the record.  One of those singles, ‘Just Be Friends,’ was released last month in its acoustic take as a representation of what audiences can expect from the EP.  It will be discussed shortly.  While not one of the album’s singles, ‘Crawling’ – another song featured in the album and EP – is also notable.  It will be discussed a little later.  Kulick’s stripped down take of ‘The Way I Am’ is one more example of what makes his new EP stand out among this year’s field of new EPs.  When these songs and the record’s two remaining works, the whole makes Sitting in a Quiet Coffeehouse a positive companion piece to Yelling in a Quiet Neighborhood.

Kulick’s new EP, Sitting in a Quiet Neighborhood is an overall enjoyable new presentation from the up-and-coming independent singer-songwriter.  Given, it is hardly the first time that any act has taken previously recorded songs and re-recorded them in acoustic takes.  That aside, it does not detract from the recording’s appeal.  The acoustic take of ‘Just Be Friends,’ which was released last month as one of the EP’s singles, serves well to show what makes the EP entertaining and engaging.  The acoustic take of ‘Just Be Friends’ gives the song a new identity with its gentle approach. It is not the more fiery version that the original proves to be. Rather, it exhibits much more vulnerability from the song’s subject.  That vulnerability takes the song and its fully accessible lyrical topic about a breakup in a whole new direction while still making it memorable.  It is just one of the works featured in this EP that serves to show what makes the record worth hearing.  ‘Crawling’ is another example of what makes Kulick’s new EP enjoyable.

Kulick’s acoustic take of ‘Crawling’ is even more stark in its difference from its full take than the acoustic take of ‘Just Be Friends’ from its source material.  The acoustic take of ‘Crawling’ gives the song and its lyrical theme more of a cynical sense in its stripped down approach than that presented in the original take.  That is made clear through the light, bluesy guitar arrangement and vocals.  The use of the strings and drums builds on that foundation, making the song seem even more like it is being presented by someone who has cynically accepted that the fault lies in himself despite knowing there is no point.  By comparison, the more fiery original take comes across more as someone who is pleading to the other party.  Considering all of this, the acoustic take of ‘Crawling’ proves to be just as engaging and entertaining as its full version.  To that end, it is just one more example of what makes Sitting in a Quiet Coffeehouse worth hearing.  The acoustic take of ‘The Way I Am’ is another example of what makes Kulick’s new EP worth hearing.

Kulick’s acoustic take of ‘The Way I Am’ is just as beautifully painful as its original take.  That is because it translates the song’s deeply moving lyrical theme just as well as the original take.  The lyrical theme in question centers on a subject who is dealing with a lot of inner emotional struggles caused by external factors.  The difference between the two takes comes in the mood set by each composition.  The mood set by the acoustic take is more vulnerable and sad.  It really is a painful presentation, but ironically so powerful because of that mood and mindset.  The original take by comparison exudes more anger alongside that sadness.  It is such a stark contrast but no less powerful.  It ultimately becomes yet another example of what makes Kulick’s EP such an interesting presentation.  When it is considered along with the other arrangements noted here and the record’s two remaining works, the whole becomes a solid companion piece to Yelling in a Quiet Neighborhood.

Kulick’s new EP, Sitting in a Quiet Coffeehouse is a presentation that his fans and pop rock fans alike will agree is well worth hearing.  That is proven through each of its five songs, which were lifted from his 2020 album, Yelling in a Quiet Neighborhood.  The songs feature arrangements that give the original songs a new identity in most cases.  Those new identities also evoke new meanings and emotions from the songs’ lyrical themes.  All three of the arrangements examined here serve well to support the noted statements.  When they are considered along with the record’s two remaining works, the whole makes the record in whole a welcome companion piece to Yelling in a Quiet NeighborhoodSitting in a Quiet Coffeehouse is available now.

More information on Kulick’s new EP is available along with of all his latest news at:

Websitehttps://kulickofficial.com

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/kulickofficial

Twitterhttps://twitter.com/kulickofficial

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

‘Turn Up That Dial’ Is Among Dropkick Murphys’ Best Albums To Date

Courtesy: Born & Bred Records

Dropkicck Murphys is scheduled to release its latest album, Turn Up That Dial Friday through its own label, Born and Bred Records.  In celebration of the album’s release, the band announced Monday that it will host a free, livestream album release part Friday.  The band’s 10th album, it offers plenty to celebrate, too, not the least of which being its featured musical arrangements, which will be discussed shortly.  The record’s lyrical content pairs with the noted musical arrangements to make for even more engagement and entertainment.  It will be discussed a little later.  The album’s sequencing rounds out its most important elements and will also be discussed later.  Each item noted here is important in its own way to the whole of the album’s presentation.  All things considered, they make the album one of the best of the band’s existing albums and one more of this year’s top new rock albums.

Dropkick Murphys’ latest album, Turn Up That Dial is one of the best of the band’s existing albums to date.  It is in reality, the band’s best album since its 2003 album, Blackout.  That is just this critic’s own take of course. Part of the record’s success comes through its featured musical arrangements.  The arrangements featured in this 39-minute presentation are more akin to the works featured in Blackout and its predecessors than the albums between Blackout and this record.  Those records – five in all – just seemed more “experimental” than fully focused.  Putting it more into layman’s terms, the noted albums – The Warrior’s Code, The Meanest of Times, Going out in Style, Signed and Sealed in Blood, and 11 Short Stories of Pain & Glory – did not have as many of the memorable hooks, melodies and choruses that this and the band’s other albums have presented.  Rather, they seemed to present more of an air of the band taking a risk and seeing where the songs would go.  That is not to say that those albums were bad by any means.  They were just less memorable than this album and the band’s four other albums.  Every song on this record features that catchy, infectious upbeat Celtic punk for which Dropkick Murphys has come to be known over the course of the band’s life.  There is even a hint of the traditional Scottish song, ‘Scotland The Brave’ in ‘Chosen Few,’ one of the new album’s entries.  It is a subtle addition to the song, but those who listen closely will catch the band’s unique arrangement of the song.  The short and simple here is that the musical arrangements featured in Turn Up That Dial will take listeners back to the sound to which they have become accustomed from Dropick Murphys while still maintaining some originality in their own presentation.  That stylistic return to form creates a solid foundation for Turn Up That Dial.  Building on that foundation is the lyrical content that accompanies the album’s musical arrangements.

The lyrical content that is featured in Turn Up That Dial is of note because of the variety in its presentations.  ‘Middle Finger,’ one of the album’s singles, serves well to exhibit that variety. Acording to co-front man Ken Casey, the song is somewhat biographical.  “Thinking of my younger days, I made things a lot harder for myself than they needed to be – and still pay for some of those mistakes now,” he said.  The note in the song’s chorus about Casey constantly putting up the middle finger, being rebellious, echoes Casey’s statement.  It is a statement that will resonate with a wide range of listeners, making it quite accessible. 

In contrast to the story featured in ‘Middle Finger,’ ‘Chosen Few’ takes a more political path as it promotes unity among Americans.  Of course, political commentary is nothing new for Dropkick Murphys.  In the case of this song, Casey has been cited as stating the song focuses on the havoc caused by now former President Donald Trump and the need for America to unite despite what Trump caused.  That message of unity comes early on in the song as Casey sings, “For a democracy to work/We gotta see it from both sides/Stop pointing fingers/Shut your mouth and compromise/These last 10 months/The division really grew/While the guy in charge said, ‘It’s just another flu’/Let’s get our s*** together/Not make things such a fuss/We can’t behave like nitwits/The world is watching us/No more silly temper tantrums/Let’s all just behave/remember who we  are/We’re the home of the brave.”  The commentary continues with Casey singing in the song’s second verse, “We used to be the heroes/Today we are the trash/They took all our good will and they shoved it up our ass/The welcome has worn out  for the red, white, and blue/If we don’t smarten up/They’re gonna tell us all to screw/But can you really  blame ‘em all/For thinking that we suck/Our antics and behavior/The people are fed up/So  let’s  find  a common  ground on which we can agree/Congress, senate, White House/And even Billy Dee.”  The song’s third and final verse follows in similar fashion, complete with Casey and company singing, “Na na na na/Na na na na/Hey, hey/Goodbye,” a cynical statement that fittingly sends Trump on his way following his election defeat.  Yes, Trump was defeated as much as he wants to deny that thanks to his narcissistic pride.  Sadly, even now in a post-Trump era, America still has not heeded that call for unity.  If anything, the nation’s division is just as wide as ever if not wider than before.  That aside, that the band would once again take on a socio-political commentary among many other topics here is more proof of the importance of the album’s lyrical content.  That the band would do so in a fashion that makes the topic so accessible adds even more to that importance.

As Dropkick Murphys closes out its new album, the record’s lyrical diversity continues in ‘I Wish You Were Here.’  The song is a lyrical tribute to the father of Casey’s fellow co-front man, Al Barr.  The folk style approach to the touching musical elegy in its musical arrangement partners well with Barr’s warm yet bittersweet rumination on his love for his father.  Barr’s statement that, “I wish you were here/How I wish you were here/I’m out on my own/I’m so far from home/And I wish you were here” is certain to resonate with so many listeners.  We all reach that point in life in which we really do miss our parents whether it be as adults ourselves or even younger.  To that end, the melancholy mood of the noted lines, paired with the song’s equally beautifully painful musical content makes this song even more impacting.  When this song’s accessible lyrical content is considered along with that in the other songs examined here and the rest of the album’s songs, the whole leaves no doubt as to the importance of the album’s lyrical content.  When the impact of the album’s lyrical content and musical arrangements is considered in whole, that collective shows even more why this album is successful.  Even with all of this in  mind, the album’s sequencing still deserves its own attention.

The sequencing of Turn Up That Dial is important to note because of the role that it has in terms of the album’s general effect.  The songs range from just over two-and-a-half minutes to as much as almost four-and-a-half minutes throughout the course of the album’s nearly 40-minute run time.   Even with that range of run times from one song to the next, the sequencing ensures that the songs’ energies keep the record’s pacing solid throughout.  That attention to detail ensures in its own way that the record keeps moving and that in turn, listeners remain engaged and entertained.  The result is that listeners will be left feeling fulfilled, knowing they have experienced a presentation that is another of Dropkick Murphys’ best albums.

Dropkick Murphys’ new album Turn Up That Dial is a work that will impress any of the band’s audiences.  That is proven in no small part to the album’s musical arrangements.  The arrangements in question are everything that audiences have come to expect from the veteran Celtic punk rock band.  The lyrical content featured in the album, which is largely presented in a somewhat retrospective fashion from one song to the next, presents plenty of diversity in its topics.  What’s more, the songs’ lyrical themes are accessible and delivered in such fashion, too.  That ensures listeners’ maintained engagement and entertainment in its own way, too.  The record’s sequencing puts the finishing touch to its presentation.  It ensures that the album progresses fluidly from one song to the next.  The result is that listeners will find the album ending before they realize it, but in the best sense possible.  Each item examined here is important in its own way to the whole of this album.  All things considered, they make Turn Up That Dial one of Dropkick Murphys’ best albums to date and one more of this year’s top new rock albums.  Turn Up That Dial is scheduled for release Friday through Born & Bred Records.

More information on Dropick Murphys’ new album is available along with all of Dropkick Murphys’ latest news at:

Websitehttps://www.dropkickmurphys.com

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/DropkickMurphys

Twitterhttps://twitter.com/DropkickMurphys

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Modern Mimes Debuts New Single, ‘Seek & Hide,’ Companion Video

Courtesy: O’Donnell Media Group

Modern Mimes debuted its latest single this week.

The trio — Adi Elcida Hernandez, Ernesto Paez, and Justin Perez — debuted its new single, ‘Seek & Hide‘ Friday, along with its companion video. The song and its video come more than four months after the debut of the band’s then latest single, ‘Karmic Fortune‘.

The video for ‘Seek & Hide’ features the band performing its new single in a darkened studio setting. Imagery, such as a pile of keys is also incorporated into the video. While no information was provided in the press release announcing the single and video’s debut, it would seem that the imagery is used to help translate the song’s lyrical content.

The lyrical content featured in ‘Seek & Hide’ seems to touch on the familiar topic of concerns with a personal relationship. That is just this critic’s interpretation and should not be taken as gospel.

The musical arrangement featured in the band’s new single is a heavy, melodic composition. It will appeal to fans of Evanescence and it front woman, Amy Lee.

Courtesy: O’Donnell Media Group

In other news, Modern Mime is scheduled to take part in Rock Fest 2021 this summer. The band is scheduled to perform July 14, on the opening day of the four-day festival. Other acts scheduled to perform on the festival’s opening day are big names, such as Queensryche, The Black Moods, and Joyous Wolf.

Rock Fest 2021 is scheduled to take place July 14-17in Cadot, WI. Tickets are available here.

More information on Modern Mimes’ new single and festival performance is available online now along with all of Modern Mimes’ latest news and more at:

Websitehttps://www.modernmimes.com

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/modernmimesmusic

Twitterhttps://twitter.com/ModernMimes

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Mason Hill Is Off To A Strong Start With Its Debut LP

Courtesy:7Hz Productions

Independent rock band Mason Hill is keeping itself quite busy this year.  The band recently announced that it is scheduled to launch a new series of live dates this fall.  The band is also scheduled to release its cover of Foo Fighters’ ‘The Best of You’ Friday.  This is all following the release of the band’s debut album Against the Wall just last month.  Released March 5 through 7Hz Productions, the 12-song record could be a breakout for the band, given the right support.  That is due in part to the record’s musical arrangements.  They will be discussed shortly.  The lyrical themes that accompany the album’s musical arrangements build on the foundation formed by that content.  The record’s production rounds out its most important elements and will be discussed later, too.  Each item noted here is important in its own way to the whole of the album’s presentation.  All things considered, they make Against the Wall unquestionably among the best of 2021’s new rock and independent albums.

Mason Hill’s debut album Against the Wall is a very strong start for the up-and-coming UK-based outfit.  That is due in part to the record’s featured musical arrangements.  From start to end, the 46-minute record’s musical arrangements hold their own against anything that America’s mainstream/active rock radio stations are playing.  The driving guitar lines and their melodies, the solid time keeping, and rich bass and drums create sounds and stylistic approaches from one song to the next that immediately lend themselves to comparisons to works from bands, such as Alter Bridge, Shinedown, and Theory of a Deadman.  Every arrangement here holds its own against any of those bands’ songs.  Whether it be the album’s powerful yet contemplative title track, the more fiery single, ‘D.N.A.,’ or even the brooding, contemplative ‘Where I Belong,’ the range of styles and sounds lines up easily with those of the works from the noted more well-known bands.  To that end, the arrangements featured throughout this record form a solid foundation for its presentation.  Building on that foundation is the lyrical content that accompanies the musical content.

The lyrical content that is featured throughout Against the Wall is just as accessible as the record’s musical arrangements.  Case in point for instance is the lyrical theme featured in ‘Find My Way.’  The song’s title makes the theme clear, while the lyrics just as easily explain the song’s message.  In this case, the message is that of breaking out on one’s own and making one’s life for one’s self.  The subject sings about being done with another person and his/her negative influence, and…well…finding his own way.  This is made clear as front man Scott Taylor sings in the song’s chorus, “I wait for you/To  let me go/So I can find my way/This time I’m sure/You’ve  got nowhere else to go/I wait for..”  He gets even firmer in the refrain, singing, “You always criticized me/You never see what I see/I won’t always wait for you/Your  life’s so hypnotizing/My mind’s so indecisive/I won’t always wait for you.”  This brief amount of content speaks volumes here.  It is, again, a statement of someone taking control of his/her life, and no longer letting someone else impact what happens.  This is a statement that will resonate with any listener, especially when it is considered along with the infectious energy and sound of the song’s musical arrangement.

‘Broken Son’ is another example of what makes the album’s lyrical content stand out just as much as its musical accompaniment.  This clearly contemplative rumination seems to deliver its own unique message of empowerment.  In this case, the message in question seems to center on someone who is refusing to let the impact of his familial past ruin the rest of his life.  This is inferred in the song’s lead verse and chorus, which state, “There’s nothing wrong with me/I just cannot see the way you used to be/And now this scene in my head/Is better off dead/With all my memories/So I say/This time I’m fixing what I’ve   done/They say it’s always my own fault/That’s all I hear/When you say my mind’s been drifting all the time/I think that you’re telling me another lie/That’s all I hear/I’m chasing all the things I’ve done/I’m learning how to be the one/This time I know/I’m letting go/I’m not your broken son.”  As noted, this lead statement comes across as being spoken from someone who is looking back at his life but empowering himself through personal realizations in his retrospection.  The seeming message continues in the song’s second verse, stating, “So worry me this way/Don’t make me be  the man  who lost it  all  today/And no w I’m  broken and scared/Now watch me pretend/I got it figured out/Well  here I am/This time I’m fixing  what I’ve done/they always  say it’s always my own fault/That’s all I hear/When you say/My mind’s  been  drifting all  the time/I think you’re telling me another lie.”  Again, here is that self re-assurance from the song’s subject.  Regardless of the commonality of a situation, such as that presented here, there are those audiences to whom this song will resonate.  When the song’s infectious musical arrangement pairs with that accessible in its own right lyrical theme, the whole shows even more why the record’s musical and lyrical content together is so powerful for   the album’s presentation.  It is just one more case in which this is proven.  ‘Where I Belong’ is yet another way in which the record’s lyrical content proves to be just as important as its featured musical arrangements.

‘Where I Belong’ is another key example of the importance of Against the Wall’s lyrical content because of the vulnerability that it exhibits in comparison to the confidence exhibited in the other examined songs.  It shows the band’s ability to reach listeners’ in a variety of emotional levels.  While the song’s title comes across as being somewhat existential, the reality here is anything but.  Rather this song is a familiar rock ballad style work that is (and many audiences might not like this) very much in the overly saccharine sweet vein of certain songs from Nickelback and Creed.  This is inferred in the song’s lead verse   and chorus, which states, “I sail through life/My eyes are closed/The memories are forgotten/The past has gone/The wind cries out your name/It’s calling me home/Yet I follow/Which has no name/Carry me home/Through fire and rain/Lay before your feet/My struggle/Is in vain/Yet I know/There is somewhere I belong/And it’s where I’m meant to be/Carry me home/To somewhere I belong.”  The super sweet ballad continues in its second verse, “The smile on your face/The stars in the sky/Let me know I’m closer/Can you see/The hope in my eyes?/Carry my home/Through fire and rain/Laid before your feet/My struggle is in vain/’Cause I know/There is somewhere I belong/And it’s where I’m meant to be/Carry me home/To somewhere I belong.”  Yes, this is one of those over-the-top arena rock style ballads in regards to its musical and lyrical content.  That aside, the fact that it is such a departure for the band in comparison to the rest of the album’s content, it is one more example of the importance of the album’s lyrical content just as much as its musical content.  It is another accessible lyrical theme and it is different from the other themes featured throughout the album.  To that end, it is just one more way in which the album’s lyrical content proves so important.  When this song’s   lyrical content and that featured in the other songs examined here is considered along with that of the rest of the album’s entries, the whole leaves no doubt as to the role of the album’s lyrical themes in its overall presentation.  Even with all of this in mind, the lyrical content is just one more part of what makes Against the Wall work.  The album’s production rounds out its most important elements.

The production that went into Against the Wall is important to examine because of its role in the album’s general effect.  Whether in the album’s high-energy moments or its more contemplative moments, the production plays a key part in making sure each song has the fullest effect.  That work succeeds, too.  The instruments are balanced expertly with one another.  At the same time, the vocals are just as well-balanced with the instrumentation, making sure that no one part overpowers another at any point in the record’s presentation.  The dynamics in each song do well to help evoke the intended thoughts and emotions from listeners, which is itself a tribute to the impact of the production.  All things considered, the production puts the finishing touch to the album’s overall presentation.  When it is considered along with the impact of the album’s musical and lyrical content, that whole makes the album overall a work that holds its own well against any work from Mason Hill’s more well-known mainstream rock counterparts.

Mason Hill’s debut album Against the Wall is a strong start for the up-and-coming rock/hard rock band.  That is proven through its musical and lyrical content, which separately and collectively prove quite accessible.  The infectious musical arrangements appeal to fans of works from the likes of Alter Bridge, Shinedown, and even Theory of a Deadman while the record’s lyrical themes are even more widely appealing.  The album’s production brings everything together, putting the final touch to the album’s presentation.  Each item noted is important in its own way to the whole of the album’s presentation.  All things considered, they make Against the Wall a surprise hit that is among the best of this year’s new rock and independent albums.  Against the Wall is available now.

European audiences will get to hear lots of music from the band’s new album this fall when the band hits the road. The band’s tentative tour schedule is noted below. Ticket information is available here.

Tour Dates:
09/02 @ Tunnels – Aberdeen, Scotland
09/03 @ Garage – Glasgow, Scotland
09/04 @ Macarts – Galashiels, Scotland
09/09 @ Grand Social – Dublin, Ireland
09/10 @ Voodoo – Belfast, Ireland
09/14 @ Junction 2 – Cambridge, England
09/15 @ Corporation – Sheffield, England
09/16 @ Fleece – Bristol, England
09/17 @ Patterns – Brighton, England
09/18 @ Leos – Gravesend, England (Sold Out)
09/20 @ Globe – Cardiff, Wales
09/21 @ Joiners – Southampton, England
09/22 @ Nightrain – Bradford, England
09/23 @ Waterloo Music Bar – Blackpool
09/24 @ Underworld – London, England
09/25 @ Rebellion – Manchester, England
09/26 @ KK’s Steel Mill – Wolverhampton, England

More information on Mason Hill’s new album, tour, and single is available along with all of the band’s latest news is available online at:

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/masonhillofficial

Twitterhttps://twitter.com/masonhillband

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Bill Kwan’s ‘No Ordinary Love’ Is A Unique Tribute To Sade

Courtesy: Ikeda Music

It goes without saying that singer Sade is a highly respected member of the music community.  She has been cited as an influence for equally famed names, such as Beyonce, Brandy, and even rapper Rakim of Eric B. and Rakim.  What’s more, she has even been honored by the British government by being named to the Order of the British Empire.  Needless to say, such honors have been well-deserved.  Later this week, jazz singer Bill Kwan will pay his own tribute to the famed singer when he releases his new covers collection, No Ordinary Love.  The nine-song collection is a presentation that fans of Kwan and Sade alike.  Those audiences will find the collection worth hearing at least once.  That is due in part to the compilation’s featured songs.  They will be discussed shortly.  The arrangements of those songs are also of note, so they will be examined a little later.  The record’s sequencing puts the finishing touch to its presentation and will also be discussed later.  Each item noted here is important in its own way to the whole of the record.  All things considered, the record proves to be a unique compilation that is worth hearing at least once.

Jazz singer Bill Kwan’s collection of covers of Sade’s music is a presentation that Sade’s fans and Kwan’s fans alike will find intriguing.  That is due in part to its featured songs.  The songs featured in this 41-minute compilation are interestingly enough, a relatively thorough representation of Sade’s catalog.  Five of her six studio recordings are represented here, going as far back as her 1985 sophomore album Promise and as recent as her latest single, ‘The Big Unknown,’ which was featured in the 2018 movie, Widows.  ‘Flower of the Universe,’ which was included in the soundtrack to Walt Disney Studios’ 2018 big screen adaptation of author Madeleine L’Engle’s 1962 novel A Wrinkle in Time is also featured in this compilation.  The only work that is not represented in this compilation is Sade’s debut 1984 album, Diamond Life.  Why Kwan did not pull from that album is anyone’s guess.  That aside, it is the only of Sade’s records to not get a nod here.  So again, to that end, Kwan’s new covers collection is still for the most part, a career retrospective of sorts for Sade.  It is just presented by another artist.  This is something that fans of Kwan and Sade alike will appreciate and is just one part of what makes the record worth hearing at least once.  The arrangements featured here add to the compilation’s interest.

Sade has always been known during her career, for crating songs that are distinctly R&B in style.  So to have her songs converted into jazz compositions was a risk.  That goes without saying.  It also goes without saying that in converting the songs over in t his case gives Sade’s works whole new identities.  Case in point is ‘No Ordinary Love.’  Sade’s original is, for the most part, a smooth R&B jam.  Though there is the most subtle hint of a rock influence as the original song progresses.  That gives the song a unique edge.  The only thing that carries over from the original to the rendition performed by Kwan and his fellow musicians is Kwan’s vocal performance.  Everything else here is unique to this song, from the gentle, flowing string arrangement, to the incorporation of the keyboards and funk-infused guitar line and percussion.  The edge that builds in the original composition is present here, too, but again is completely unlike its source material.  Whether that divide is good or bad will be left for audiences to determine for themselves.  Regardless, it stands as a prime example of why the arrangements featured in this collection make it so intriguing.  Kwan’s take of ‘King of Sorrow’ is another example of the importance of the record’s arrangements.  Where a song, such as ‘No Ordinary Love’ breaks noticeably from its source material, this song stays closer to that source material.  The bass line at the center of the original song is present here through the use of a cello, and is accented nicely through a piano line in place of the strings that were used in the original.  There are additional strings here, but they are more of a backing element along with what sounds like an accordion.  The whole (including the steady time keeping)   gives the song a unique samba style approach in Kwan’s version even as close as his take sticks to the original song.  It makes the song a rendition that fans of each artist will enjoy and in turn one more example of why the arrangements featured in this recording are important in their own way to this compilation’s presentation.  It clearly is just one more example of the importance of the record’s musical arrangements.  ‘Haunt Me’ is another notable example of the importance of the arrangements featured in these covers.

While Sade’s original take here is grounded in a decidedly Spanish guitar style arrangement and piano, Kwan and company’s rendition presents much the same sense of melancholy, but in his own fashion.  The piano line takes the place of the guitar here while a muted trumpet – which replaces the saxophone line in the original — adds a certain accent to the whole.  That combination of elements, together with Kwan’s own airy vocal delivery gives the song a new identity while still mostly staying true to the original.  It paints a picture of those dimly lit night clubs of the 1920s and 30s that have so often been portrayed in so many gangster flicks that are set in that era.  The differences are there, but the two are still close enough that again, audiences on both sides will enjoy this take.  To that end, it is just one more example of what makes the collection worth hearing.  Any of the record’s other songs can be cited in supporting the noted statement.  Keeping that in mind, the arrangements’ importance is even clearer.  Even with this in mind, the record still has one more important element to examine in its sequencing.

The sequencing of No Ordinary Love is important to examine because of the impact that it plays in terms of the arrangements’ ability to keep listeners engaged and entertained overall.  The record starts in mid-tempo fashion in ‘The Sweetest Taboo’ before pulling back significantly in the much more relaxed take of ‘Flower of the Universe.’  The record switches things up noticeably from here by slightly picking up again in the Latin-tinged ‘King of Sorrow’ before pulling back yet again in ‘Jezebel.’  Kwan and company’s cover of ‘No Ordinary Love’ picks the energy back up yet again before yet again pulling back in ‘The Moon and the Sky.’   From here, the album’s energy picks up ever so slightly once more in ‘Love is Stronger Than Pride,’ which itself gives way yet again to a more relaxed work in ‘Haunt Me.’ The whole thing ends in relaxed fashion in ‘The Big Unknown.’  Looking back at all of this, the album’s sequencing clearly keeps things interesting from beginning.  It goes back and forth from one song to the next, making sure that listeners never get too comfortable with one energy and style or another.  It shows that plenty of time and thought was put into this aspect of the album.  When that aspect is considered along with the songs and their arrangements (and their respective importance), the whole of these elements makes the collection in whole a presentation that fans of Sade and Bill Kwan alike will find appealing.

Bill Kwan’s new collection of Sade covers is an interesting tribute to the work of someone who despite having only released six albums, is still among the genre’s most influential artists.  It is a presentation that will find wide appeal among audiences.  This is proven in part through the record’s featured songs.  The songs represent a relatively healthy representation of Sade’s catalog and will appeal to audiences in its own way.  The arrangements that Kwan and his fellow musicians present will generate their own share of interest in their own way.  That is because some are more closely akin to their source material than others.  Regardless, each arrangement still presents its own unique identity in each instance.  The sequencing of the featured songs rounds out the most important of the record’s elements.  It prevents the compilation from becoming redundant since it constantly changes up the songs’ stylistic approach, and in turn energy.  When this aspect is considered along with the record’s other noted items, the whole becomes a presentation that fans of Sade and Bill Kwan alike will find worth hearing at least once.  No Ordinary Love is scheduled for release Friday through Ikeda Music.  More information on the compilation is available along with all of Kwan’s latest news and more at https://www.facebook.com/BillKwanMusic.  

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.  

Andre Comeau Debuts New Single, ‘Clean Break’

Courtesy: O’Donnell Media Group

MTV legend Andre Comeau unveiled his new single over the weekend.

Comeau and his band, which bears his name, premiered its new single, ‘Clean Break‘ Friday. ‘Clean Break’ is the first single and title track from Andre Comeau’s forthcoming album.

Comeau was part of the cast of the very first Real World installment, Real World: New York. Following his time on the show, he then went on to a successful career with the independent rock band Reigndance, which itself was featured in the then groundbreaking series.

The musical arrangement featured in Comeau’s new single is itself very much an indie-rock style composition. That is evidenced in the arrangement’s DIY sound, considering the guitar arrangement and vocals, and even the drums.

No information was provided about the song’s lyrical theme, though it would seem the song’s lyrical theme centers on the topic of a broken relationship.

More information on Andre Comeau’s new single is available along with all of the band’s latest news at:

Website: https://Andrecomeaumusic.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/andrecomeaumusic

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.worpress.com.

Joseph Howell Quartet’s ‘Live In Japan’ Is Among The Best Of 2021’s New Live Recordings

Coutesy: Summit Records

More than three years ago, nobody would have ever imagined that the COVID-19 pandemic would make its way to the shores, or even around the world.  Now more than a year into the pandemic, questions still remain about when it will finally end and when the world will finally be able to throw out the masks and finally return to life as we once knew it.  That normal life includes going out to enjoy live music, which thankfully is looking more likely to happen again sooner rather than later.  Announcements are not necessarily coming fast and furious, but they are happening, and the concerts are returning this year.  However, there are still those promoters and organizers who are sitting on their hands, waiting for “the other guy” to make the first move.  Luckily, while audiences continue to wait for the full return of live music, jazz group Joseph Howell Quartet is giving its audiences and jazz fans alike a way to get their live music fix.  The group released its new live recording, Live in Japan Feb. 5 through Summit Records.  The seven-song recording will appeal to all of the noted audiences.  That is due in part to its companion booklet.  It is rare for any recording’s booklet to be the most important part of said presentation, but that is the case here.  It will be discussed shortly.  The songs and the band’s performance thereof collectively make up another key aspect of the recording.  Together with the booklet, the elements make the overall presentation even more engaging and entertaining.  They will be discussed a little later.  The recording’s production puts the finishing touch to its presentation.  When it is considered along with the rest of the recording’s noted items, that whole makes Live in Japan an unquestionable candidate for a spot on the list of this year’s top new live CDs.

Joseph Howell Quartet’s recently released live recording, Live in Japan, is a positive new offering from the band.  It is a presentation that will help any jazz fan get his or her live music fix while waiting for live music to finally make its full return.  Part of the recording’s appeal comes from its companion booklet.  As a matter of fact, the recording’s companion booklet is the most important of its elements.  That is because of the background that audiences receive through its liner notes.  The liner notes give a thorough explanation of how Howell, a United States Navy veteran came to join his fellow musicians – Keigo Hirakawa (piano), Kenjo Shimada (bass), Kenichi Nishio (drums) – came together.  Not to give away too much, but according to Howell, the group came together thanks in large part to Hirakawa.  There is more to the story, and audiences will be left to learn the rest of the story for themselves. 

The story of how Howell and company formed their group is just one part of the story told through the booklet’s liner notes.  Howell also points out his pleasure that while the recording was originally captured in 2018, it was released this year in lieu of any new live music.  Howell admits here that because of the pandemic’s impact, he was uncertain as to when the group would manage to reunite, leading to the appreciation that the recording was archived and released now.  That anecdote alone makes for its own interest.  That is because as enjoyable as it is, there is a chance it might be the only show the group plays together in one place for some time.  That understanding will lead to more appreciation for this fully engaging and entertaining show among audiences.

As if all of this is not enough, Howell also offers up an explanation in the liner notes as to why the recording features performances of covers instead of originals.  Again, not to give away too much, but the explanation points out that the reasoning had to do with Howell’s personal taste in music; especially jazz and its various subgenres.  This explanation makes for its for its own share of interest.  Together with the other noted anecdotes noted here and everything else noted in the liner notes, the whole makes clear why the recording’s companion booklet is so important to its whole. It sets the scene and mood for the recording’s presentation, and does so in expert fashion.

The rich presentation that the recording’s liner notes creates for its whole are just one of the ways in which the recording stands out.  As noted, the songs featured in this recording are all covers.  They are presentations of songs originally composed by jazz legends, such as Wayne Shorter, Billy Strayhorn, and Joe Henderson.  Considering what Howell noted in the liner notes as to the decision to perform covers instead of original work, such presentation makes sense and is just as welcome as any original works that might have otherwise featured in the concert.  All three musicians/composers crafted works that fit well into the post bop subgenre of jazz.  Howell and company do Shorter full justice in the group’s take of ‘Nefertiti.’  Howell’s performance on clarinet here is just as rich as Shorter’s performance on the soprano sax in the original.  Meanwhile, Hirakawa’s performance on piano is just as impressive in its subtle sort of counterpoint to Howell’s performance.  Nishio deserves his own praise as his performance on the drums does so well to harken back to the little used drum part in Shorter’s original composition.  It puts a nice subtle accent to the whole just as with the original tune.

The group’s take on Joe Henderson’s ‘Mamacita’ is another great example of why the group’s chosen songs and performances thereof are important to the recording’s presentation.  Shimada and Hirakawa pair in the song’s opening lines to set the mood.  This takes the original song a step farther because the original does not feature that bass line in its opening bars.  It makes for an interesting enhancement that is a nice secondary to the piano line.  Given, Howell and company’s take does not have the richness of the full Joe Henderson sextet.  That take really makes for a more big band style sound and approach while this take is more intimate for lack of better wording.  That’s the important thing, though.  The varied sound and stylistic approach gives the song a slightly different identity from its source material, which itself will make for even more engagement and entertainment.

The quartet’s take of Billy Strayhorn and Duke Ellington’s famed (and timeless) composition, ‘Take The A Train’ is another example of the importance of the recording’s featured songs and their performances.  As with the set’s other noted songs, this work is well known among many jazz circles. Hirakawa’s performance in this song takes listeners, once again, back to Howell’s comments in the liner notes of why he wanted to go with covers for the performance rather than new songs.  The covers gave more opportunity for improvisation, especially within the group, according to Howell.  Improvising is exactly what Hirakawa does in this performance, too.  His runs are stylistically similar to those of Strayhorn, but still bear their own identity.  The result is that they create a presentation that while familiar, is still its own unique work from the group.  When this song and performance are considered with the others noted here and the rest of those featured in the recording, no doubt is left as to the importance of that overall content.  When that content is considered along with everything offered through the liner notes, that collective makes for even more entertainment and engagement.  Even with all of this in mind, there is still a little left for audiences to appreciate, in the form of the recording’s production.

The production of Live in Japan is so important to consider because of the clarity in the sound.  Audiences know they are listening to a live recording, but there is something in the sound – thanks to the production – that makes the recording almost studio quality.  If not for the subtle audience sound and laughs from the band members, one would almost assume the recording was in fact a studio recording.  That is meant in the best way possible.  It is overall, just that clear.  The enjoyment created through such clarity puts the finishing touch to the recording’s presentation.  When it is considered along with the positives of the songs and performances thereof, and of the booklet’s liner notes, that whole makes Live in Japan a presentation that Howell and company’s fans will enjoy just as much as any jazz fan in general.

Joseph Howell Quartet’s recently released live recording, Live in Japan, is a presentation that any jazz fan will enjoy.  That is due in part to its booklet.  The liner notes featured in the booklet offer so much rich background information about the band’s history and the recording.  This forms a solid foundation for the recording.  The songs and performances featured in the recording make for their own appeal.  The songs themselves are familiar as are the artists who originally composed them.  What’s more, the songs all feature a familiar style of jazz, joining them together on that thread, too.  The band’s performance of the songs pays tribute to their composers and the original compositions while also providing them a somewhat new identity in the process.  That adds even more enjoyment to the overall listening experience.  The production of the overall performance gives it the finishing touch, giving the recording a fully professional sound.  Each item noted here is important in its own way to the whole of the recording.  All things considered, they make Live in Japan one of the best of this year’s new live CDs.  Live in Japan is available now.  More information on this and other titles from Summit Records is available at:

Website: https://www.summitrecords.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SummitRecords

Twitter: https://twitter.com/SummitRecords

To keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspickswordpress.com.  

Beth Jean’s Sophomore Album Shows Promise For Her Future In The Family Music Community

Courtesy: Jetti Winkle Music

More than a year after shutting down due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, Broadway is slowly turning its lights back on and welcoming audiences back to its theaters.  News agencies nationwide have been reporting the news in the past week or so.  The timing of that tentatively optimistic news comes at a fitting time for family music entertainer Beth Jean.  That is because Jean’s new theater-inspired album, Let’s Put on a Show, is scheduled for release Friday, right around the same time that the noted news about Broadway’s re-opening has come along.  The theater inspiration goes so far that the album’s track listing is presented in the fashion of a playbill, playfully dividing the album into two separate acts.  This general presentation aspect will be discussed a little more shortly.  It sets the foundation for the album’s foundation.  Building on that foundation is the record’s musical content.  It will be discussed a little later.  The lyrical themes featured alongside the album’s musical content rounds out the album’s most important elements.  It will also be discussed later.  When it is considered along with the record’s musical content and its general presentation, all three elements collectively make Beth Jean’s new album a presentation that will leave any young listener wanting to put on his or her own show.

Beth Jean’s latest album, Let’s Put on a Show, is a presentation that is sure to appeal to her young audiences.  For that matter, it is just as likely to appeal to some older audiences.  That is proven in part through its general presentation.  Jean presented the album’s packaging – specifically the track listing – as if it was a playbill.  That goes in conjunction with comments that she recently made about the album being inspired by her own love of theater.

“I adore classic Broadway musicals with their big tap numbers, belt-at-the-top-of-your-lungs show tunes, and glitzy, sequined costumes,” said Jean. “I like the idea of people listening to this album and envisioning their own shows. It reminds me of growing up, pre-YouTube, and imagining what the choreography looked like and what the storylines were of the Broadway albums that I listened to. If there’s a message in Let’s Put On a Show, it’s ‘Be yourself, and don’t be afraid to sing and dance your heart out to these fun, silly songs! Embrace what makes you – you!’”  That love of theater is show, again, in the fact that Jean presented her new album’s track listing in the fashion of a playbill.  Now it should be noted here that the album is not a play or even a concept album.  This was just a fun way for Jean to follow the album’s noted overarching theme.  It is more or less just an aesthetic element, but still does its own share to help set the mood for the record.  To that end, it is its own important aspect to the album’s presentation.  It is just one of the items that makes Jean’s new album appealing.  The musical content presented throughout the album adds its own appeal to the record.

The musical arrangements featured in Let’s Put on a Show are important to address because of their variety.  There are some songs whose arrangements will appeal to pre-K age listeners with their light, playful arrangements.  Among the more notable of those songs are works, such as the early entry, ‘You Are Magic!,’  ‘I Am A Hamser, Yes I Am!,’ and ‘Tweet a Little Tweet Tweet.’  These songs will especially appeal to fans of Jean’s fellow family music counterpart, Laurie Berkner.  Along with those arrangements that are geared younger, Jean also features some kindie-pop style works that will appeal to kindergarten students in works, such as ‘Never Give Up,’ ‘The Best Mustache in Michigan,’ and ‘Whoopsie Daisy.’  Jean even goes somewhat 90s in this record in ‘No Gravity’ what with the keyboard lines and general vocal approach.  So simply put, what audiences get here is an album that ensures listeners’ engagement and entertainment just as much through its musical arrangements as through its general presentation.  These two elements are just a portion of what makes the album work.  The lyrical diversity featured in the album is just as important to its presentation as the record’s musical arrangements and its general presentation.

The lyrical themes that are featured in Let’s Put on a Show are important because, as noted, they are diverse.  At the same time, they are also largely uplifting.  ‘Never Give Up’ openly reminds young listeners to…well…never give up on anything in life.  That can be in regards to something they are doing at a given moment, or even on long-term goals that they might have.  She comes right out and tells her young listeners, “never give up/Every time you find sunshine” before later telling them, “You can do anything.”  This supportive message is just as welcome here as any other instance in which it is presented. 

On a completely different topic, Jean playfully sings about penguins in ‘Waddlin’ We Go (The Penguin Song).’  The penguins sing about how they waddle and slide around their cold, icy home.  The use of the ukulele alongside the silly, smile-inducing lyrical topic ensures in its own right, listeners’ enjoyment and engagement.  It is yet another way in which the diversity in the record’s lyrical diversity is displayed, in turn showing even more why that diversity is so important to the album’s presentation.

Things get even sillier later in the album’s run as Jean presents a song about a little garden gnome in the aptly titled ‘Garden Gnome.’  The little gnome’s story about its life in front of a house is a sweet, innocent story that is just as sure as the other songs noted here and the rest of the album’s works, to put a smile on listeners’ faces.  Between the sweet, silly story and its innocence, the story here shows once more what makes the lyrical content in Jean’s new album so important.  In considering this content, that in the other songs noted here and that in the rest of the album’s songs, no doubt is left as to the importance of the album’s overall lyrical content.  It clearly does just as much as the album’s musical arrangements and its general approach to make the record fully entertaining and engaging.

Beth Jean’s sophomore album Let’s Put on a Show – her sophomore album – is a positive new offering from the up-and-coming family entertainer.  That is proven in part through the album’s general presentation, which sets the tone for the record with its theater-themed packaging (including the plabybill style track listing).  The musical arrangements that are featured in Jean’s new album does its own part to engage and entertain listeners, too.  That is because of their diversity.  There is some kindie-pop style music here, as well as stylistic approaches that will appeal to pre-k level listeners, as well as even a 90s pop rock style arrangement or two.  That diversity in itself will definitely ensure its own appeal.  Add in the fact that Jean presented some of the songs very much in a musical theater style and the importance of the record’s musical content gains even more importance.  The diverse lyrical content rounds out the album’s most important elements.  It rangers from the silly to the more serious throughout, giving listeners plenty to anticipate throughout, too.  When this element is considered along with everything else noted here, the result is a record that shows  real promise for Jean’s future in the family music community.  Let’s  Put on a Show is scheduled for release Friday through Jetti Winkle Records.

More information on Jean’s new album is available along with all of her latest news at:

Websitehttps://www.bethjean.com

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/bethjeanmusic

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Hyro The Hero Debuts New Single, ‘Legendary’; Plans New “Mixtape” Project

Courtesy: Atom Splitter PR

Independent rapper Hyro The Hero debuted his latest single this week.

The rapper (a.k.a. Hyron Louis Fenton, Jr.) debuted his new single, ‘Legendary‘ Friday. The song features a guest appearance by Atreyu co-front man Brandon Saller. The composition comes more than two months after Fenton premiered his then latest single, ‘Retaliation Generation,’ which itself featured a guest appearance by Ice Nine Kills front man Spencer Charnas.

‘Legend’ is a departure of sorts, stylistically, for Fenton, even in comparison to ‘Retaliation Generation’ and his other recent singles, ‘Fight‘ (which featured Hellyeah/Mudvayne front man Chad Gray on guest vocals) and ‘We Believe‘ (which features Disturbed front man David Draiman on guest vocals). The song is heavy and Fenton’s flow is as solid as ever here. Though the addition of the more subdued momentary vocals provided by Saller in the choruses makes for a softer, more melodic approach. It gives this song its own unique identity separate from that presented in ‘Fight’ and ‘We Believe.’

‘Legendary’ was co-written by Fenton, Saller, Matt Good, Dan Jacobs, and Travis Miguel. Good additionally produced the song.

According to Fenton, the song’s lyrical theme is a contemplative presentation.

“‘Legendary’ is a look into the life and feeling of a champion,” he said. “I wanted to express how it would feel in my mind to make such an impact on the world that you are considered a legend.”

Additionally, Fenton spoke warmly of Saller and his band mates’ participation in the new song.

“I’m so happy that Atreyu was able to be a part of this song and that Brandon Saller lent his amazing vocals,” added Fenton. “They have been in the game for years and bring an actual legendary power and life to it. This is such an epic track and my goal is that it will inspire others to lean into their greatness.”

Saller returned Fenton’s sentiments about collaborating.

“Hyro first got put on my radar maybe seven years ago by a good friend, Fred Archambault,” said Saller. “Since then I’ve had my eye on what he was doing. Last summer, we did the Disrupt Festival with him, and he blew me away at every show. His energy was amazing and we immediately hit it off. When the opportunity came to be on a track with him, I had no hesitations. This song has such a vibe to it and has so much power. I’m stoked to be a part of it.”

‘Legendary’ is the first song from a new “mixtape” presentation that Fenton announced. The project is dubbed Kids Against The Monsters. Fenton presented a statement about the project early this week through Knotfest. Knotfest will feature a series of interviews with Fenton in the coming weeks to look deeper into his new project. Charnas and Gray are among the guests scheduled to appear in the noted interviews, hinting that ‘Fight,’ ‘Retaliation Generation,’ and ‘We Believe’ might end up inthe mixtape project, too.

Kids Against Monsters is scheduled for release later this year. Its exact release date is under consideration.

More information on Hyro The Hero’s new single, video, and livestreatm is available online now along with all of Hyro The Hero’s latest news and more at:

Websitehttps://www.hyrothehero.com

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/HyroTheHero

Twitterhttps://twitter.com/hyrothehero

More information on Atreyu is available online now along with all of the band’s latest news and more at:

Websitehttps://www.atreyofficial.com

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/atreyu

Twitterhttps://twitter.com/atreyuofficial

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Mason Hill Plans Foo Fighters Cover, Tour; Band’s Debut LP Available Now

Courtesy: 7Hz Productions

Independent rock band Mason Hill has a new single coming later this month.

The band is scheduled to release its cover of Foo Fighters’ hit single, ‘The Best of You’ April 23. While audiences wait for the band to premiere that cover, they can enjoy the band’s latest single, ‘D.N.A.’ and its companion video. The band premiered the pair in January.

The musical arrangement featured in ‘D.N.A.’ is a high-energy hard rock composition that will appeal to fans of bands, such as Theory of a Deadman, Hinder, and Three Days Grace. The lyrical content that accompanies the song’s musical arrangement comes across as taking on the familiar topic of dealing with one’s inner struggles.

The ‘D.N.A.’ video features the band in a specially lit studio setting as it performs its new single.

‘D.N.A.’ is the third single from the band’s debut album, Against The Wall. Its premiere follows that of ‘Against The Wall‘ and ‘Hold On.’

Against The Wall was released March 5 through 7Hz Productions and peaked at #19 on the UK National Album Chart. It reached the top spot on the UK Rock Album Chart.

The album’s release and charting shows the band is making waves with its record. It marks the first time since Greta Van Fleet released its 2018 debut album, that a rock band has premiered in the Top 20 in the UK National Album Chart.

Additionally, it is the first time that a British rock act debuted in the UK Top 20. What’s more, it marks the first time since 2014 — when Royal Blood released its debut album — that a British rock band debuted in the top spot in the UK Rock Album Chart.

Along with ‘D.N.A.,’ Against The Wall also features the singles, ‘Against The Wall‘ and ‘Hold On.’ Against The Wall is available to stream and download through Apple Music, Spotify, Amazon, and SoundCloud.

Courtesy: 7Hz Productions

In other news, Mason Hill is planning a series of live dates this fall in support of its new album. The tour is scheduled to launch Sept. 2 at Aberdeen Tunnels and to run through Sept. 26 at Wolverhampton KK’s Steel Mill. The tour’s schedule is noted below. Ticket information is available here.

Tour Dates:
09/02 @ Tunnels – Aberdeen, Scotland
09/03 @ Garage – Glasgow, Scotland
09/04 @ Macarts – Galashiels, Scotland
09/09 @ Grand Social – Dublin, Ireland
09/10 @ Voodoo – Belfast, Ireland
09/14 @ Junction 2 – Cambridge, England
09/15 @ Corporation – Sheffield, England
09/16 @ Fleece – Bristol, England
09/17 @ Patterns – Brighton, England
09/18 @ Leos – Gravesend, England (Sold Out)
09/20 @ Globe – Cardiff, Wales
09/21 @ Joiners – Southampton, England
09/22 @ Nightrain – Bradford, England
09/23 @ Waterloo Music Bar – Blackpool
09/24 @ Underworld – London, England
09/25 @ Rebellion – Manchester, England
09/26 @ KK’s Steel Mill – Wolverhampton, England

More information on Mason Hill’s new single, video, tour and all of its latest news is available online at:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/masonhillofficial

Twitter: https://twitter.com/masonhillband

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to https://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.