‘Nature: Bears’ Largely Successful In Its Presentation Of The World’s Different Species Of Bears

Courtesy: PBS/PBS Distribution/WNET

PBS’ popular wildlife series Nature has, over the years, brought audiences countless hours of educational and entertaining content about animals and ecosystems from around the world.  From the plains of Africa to the waters of the Great Barrier Reef to the highest peaks of the Andes, the series has done so much for audiences.  Now with a mutated flu running rampant around the globe and causing so much unnecessary fear, panic and closures, the program is needed more than ever.  That is because even zoos, where people might otherwise be able to be exposed to many of those animals and ecosystems, are among the many places closed as a result of that unnecessary fear and panic.  So where else to be exposed to nature and wildlife in general than in PBS’ long-running series?  In one of its most recently released episodes, Bears, the program takes a look at the different species of bears that roam the world.  The surprising revelations about the different species form a strong foundation for the program.  It will be discussed shortly.  While that engaging content does a lot to help this episode of Nature, it should be noted that there is one negative to the whole.  That one negative is once again, is the preachy message about conservation pushed into the program’s final minutes.  This is not the first time that this has happened with an episode of Nature, and is something that needs to stop.  It will be addressed a little later.  Getting back to the positive, the program’s collective pacing and transitions round out its most important elements.  They work with the episode’s content and makes it well worth watching even despite the unnecessary preaching pushed into the episode’s final moments.  Keeping that in mind, Nature: Bears proves to be another overall positive episode of Nature.

Nature: Bears, one of the latest releases from PBS’ popular wildlife series Nature, is a welcome presentation for audiences everywhere in a time when panic and fear over COVID-19 has caused so much unnecessary closure nationwide.  It serves to expose audiences to a variety of bears that they otherwise might not have been exposed to at the zoos and other wildlife facilities that are now closed.  That introduction to the different species forms the program’s foundation.  Audiences are introduced to familiar bear species, such as black bears, grizzly bears and polar bears over the roughly hour-long episode as well as perhaps less familiar species, such as the sloth bear and the spectacled bear.  Not only are viewers introduced to all of those species of bears, but they are also introduced to the things that make each bear unique.  For instance, viewers learn that the polar bear’s sense of smell is 20 times stronger than that of a bloodhound, and that it can smell its prey as deep as three feet beneath the ice.  Also of interest in the program is the revelation that the sloth bear is able to avoid the pain of solder termites’ pincers when it breaks down termite colonies because of the construction of the bear’s mouth.  In regard to the grizzly bears, viewers learn that they learn through what is essentially modeling.  The cubs learn how to hunt for fish, for instance, by watching their mother.  That is very similar throughout the animal kingdom.  On another note, audiences also learn in watching the program that bears scratch their backs on trees, not because their backs itch, but because of territorial marking.  So, as funny as it is to watch, it actually serves a key purpose in the lives of bears.  All of this is just a snapshot of everything that is discussed throughout the course of Bears.  When it is considered along with the content that was note addressed here, the whole of the program’s main feature proves to be worthwhile presentation for audiences of all ages.  Even when the discussions on bears mating and hunting come up, the content is largely edited, so viewers don’t have to worry about covering their children’s eyes or fast forwarding at any point.  To that end, it makes the program that much more accessible for viewers.  All things considered, the content featured in Nature: Bears builds a strong foundation for this program.  Of course for all of the positives presented through the DVD’s content, it is difficult to ignore its one negative element, the unnecessary preaching about conservation at the program’s end.

As Nature: Bears nears its end, narrator Olga Merediz begins reading lines that make statements about the danger that many bears are in, such as the polar bear because of global warming.  At another point prior, she reads a message about how deforestation endangered panda bears in Asia.  Yes, we know global warming is a problem.  There is no denying it.  There is also no denying that deforestation globally is a problem.  However, being that the rest of the program did so much to educate and entertain, having that element to close out was not necessary.  It ruins an otherwise enjoyable program because of its preachy nature.  Please do not misunderstand the statement being made here.  There is no doubt that global warming should be addressed.  There is no doubt that the deforestation that nearly wiped out the panda bears is still very much of concern.  However, as important as they are, there is a time and place for everything, and a program that is otherwise presented solely as an educational piece does not need to include preachy messages about environmentalism at any point.  That should be saved for another time and perhaps another episode of Nature that is dedicated entirely to the issue facing the planet. For an episode that is supposed to focus on animals, that preachiness should not be there.  This is not the first time that this has happened in an episode of Nature, and likely isn’t the last either.  Hopefully though, the people at PBS will take this into consideration for future episodes of Nature.  Now as much of a detriment as that preachiness is to this episode of Nature, it doesn’t make the program unwatchable.  The collective pacing and transitions that are used throughout the program make the primary content even more engaging.

The pacing and transitions that are used throughout the course of Nature: Bears is so important because it is these elements that keep the program flowing from start to end.  Considering the number of species of bear featured throughout the program and what makes each species unique from one another, there is clearly a lot of content presented.  Just enough time was given to each species and its abilities and adaptations from one to the next.  As each species’ focus gives way to focus on other species around the world, the transitions are seamless.  Audiences are never left behind and are never left feeling like the transitions are stark.  Everything is fluid throughout the program.  That fluidity and the steady pacing ensures that audiences will be largely, if not fully, engaged in this episode of Nature from start to end.  When this is taken into account with the power of the program’s content, that certainty of engagement and entertainment is strengthened even more.  That is even despite the one issue of the unnecessary environmentalist message pushed so hard in the program’s final moments.  Keeping that in mind, Nature: Bears proves itself another largely positive episode of what is one of PBS’ most notable series.

Nature: Bears, released on DVD Jan. 28, is another largely positive presentation from PBS’ long-running wildlife series.  It takes viewers around the world, profiling various species of bear and their unique adaptations and abilities.  Along the way, its pacing and transitions do a lot to make even more certain that viewers will remain engaged and entertained.  Even with the unnecessary environmentalist preaching at the episode’s end, those positives still make the program largely a positive presentation.  It is available now.  More information on this and other episodes of Nature is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/PBSNature

Twitter: http://twitter.com/PBSNature

 

 

 

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Eagle Rock Entertainment Announces Home Release Date, Specs For New Miles Davis Doc

Courtesy: Eagle Rock Entertainment

Eagle Rock Entertainment will bring the new Miles Davis documentary Birth of the Cool home next month.

The documentary, which originally premiered at the 2019 Sundance Film Festival, grossed more than $1 million during its recent theatrical run.  It is scheduled for home release April 10, and will be available as a BD/DVD combo pack and 2DVD with bonus Montreux concert footage and 16-page hardcover book and all digital platforms.  The Montreux footage was culled from Davis’ performances at the festival in 1973, 1984 and 1985.

The performance listing for the Montruex shows is noted below.

 

BONUS DVD – ALL LIVE FROM MONTREUX Tracklisting
1.) Ife (1973)
2.) Star People (1984 Afternoon)
3.) It Gets Better (1984 Afternoon)
4.) Hopscotch; Star On Cicely (1984 Afternoon)
5.) Lake Geneva (1984 Afternoon)
6.) Star People (1985 Evening)
7.) Hopscotch (1985 Evening)

 

The documentary, which also recently aired nationwide on PBS as part of the network’s beloved American Masters series, was directed by three-time Emmy award winner Stanley Nelson. It profiles the life and career of the late great trumpeter Miles Davis.  The profile features never-before-seen live performances and outtakes from Davis’ studio sessions.  It also features interviews with people who knew Davis both professionally and personally, such as Quincy Jones, Carlos Santana, Clive Davis, Wayne Shorter and Ron Carter.

The documentary was nominated for a Grammy at the 62nd annual Grammy Awards and for a NAACP Image Award in the category of “Outstanding Documentary (Film).”

More information on this and other titles from Eagle Rock Entertainment is available online at:

 

Website: http://www.eagle-rock.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/EagleRockEnt

Twitter: http://twitter.com/EagleRockNews

 

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PBS’ New ‘Nature’ Episode Is A ‘Big’ Success

Courtesy: PBS/PBS Distribution/WNET

Nature is full of giant creatures, and in a new episode of its hit wildlife series Nature, PBS is introducing audiences to some of nature’s biggest beasts.  Nature: Nature’s Biggest Beasts was released on DVD Jan. 14.  The hour-long episode takes viewers around the world, presenting the biggest of the big and even the biggest of the small.  That central aspect of the DVD forms the program’s foundation, and does a good job of doing so.  As interesting as all of the discoveries are throughout the episode, the program is not perfect, sadly.  The program’s final statement detracts from the episode, but thankfully not to the point that it makes the episode unwatchable.  This will be addressed a little later.  While the program’s finale does detract from its whole, it is the program’s only negative.  There is at least one more positive to note in examining the episode.  That positive is the episode’s pacing.  Each item noted is important in its own way to the whole of the episode.  All things considered, they make Nature: Nature’s Biggest Beasts its own “big” hit.

Nature: Nature’s Biggest Beasts is its own big, successful presentation.  That is due in large part (no pun intended) to its central story.  The hour-long program takes viewers around the world, offering audiences introductions to the biggest of the biggest and biggest of the small beasts.  From the giraffe, which has to position itself just right in order to be able to get a drink of water, to a certain kind of leech, which can eat other invertebrates, to a giant octopus, which can eat other sea life twice its size and more, the program’s central feature serves as a good starting point for so many biology lessons from high school onward.  The program takes audiences into the treetops and skies and even below the waves time and again, wasting little time along the way.  That matter, that of the program’s pacing, will be discussed later.  The central story will surprise many viewers as it introduces them to creatures that they otherwise might not have ever known about.  Case in point are the specific species of bats, beetles and even crabs featured within the program.  On a side note, the crab that is introduced in this program looks a lot like the one who held Maui’s hook in Disney’s Moana.  One can’t help but wonder if that real life crab served as the model for that character.  Getting back on the topic at hand, the various beasts that are introduced throughout the course of Nature’s Biggest Beasts and what makes them so intriguing more than gives audiences reason to take in this episode of NOVA.  That ensured engagement forms a solid foundation for the DVD.

For all of the strength that Nature’s Biggest Beasts gains through its central presentation, there is one problem with this episode that cannot be ignored.  That problem is presented, go figure, at the episode’s end.  As viewers are introduced to the corals that make up the Great Barrier Reef, the narrator makes a direct statement about appreciating and protecting all of nature’s beasts, whether they are the biggest of the big or the biggest of the small.  This is important to note because in hindsight, the whole episode essentially rounds out to one big preachy presentation.  The thing is that the preachy aspect was so covertly incorporated into the program.  It would have been so easy to have not had that element added to the mix, but the fact that it was put in at the very end results in that lasting impression that audiences really are sitting through one big statement story.  That realization that audiences will experience can and does leave a bad taste in some viewers’ mouths so to speak.  Keeping that in mind, this is a detriment to the episode’s presentation.  It is not so bad that it makes the episode unwatchable.  Regardless, it is an element that cannot be ignored.  Luckily for the episode’s sake (and for that of everyone involved in the episode’s creation), this negative is the program’s only con.  Its pacing works with its central presentation to make it that much more worth watching.

The pacing of Nature’s Biggest Beasts is key to note because over the course of roughly an hour, a lot of ground (and water – yes, that awful pun was intended) is covered.  From Africa to North America to Asia to the Atlantic and even to the Arctic, viewers are taken around the globe.  Considering how many regions and animals are examined, it would have been so easy for the pacing to get out of control and leave viewers behind.  Thankfully, that did not happen here.  For all of the material that is presented throughout, each beast and each region of the world gets just enough time.  The transitions from one segment to the next adds to the positive impact of the program’s pacing.  The two elements collectively do just enough to ensure viewers are able to keep up with everything, and in turn to ensure that they gain a certain appreciation for what makes each big beast so intriguing.  That time and thought that was incorporated into the program’s pacing and the transitions clearly paid off.  Considering the successful result of that material and the engagement and entertainment ensured through the presentation itself, the two elements do a lot to make it another positive offering from PBS.  That is even with the issue of the preachy message that was so covertly included in the program.  All things considered, Nature’s Biggest Beasts proves to be a possible candidate for a spot on any critic’s list of the year’s top new documentaries.

Nature: Nature’s Biggest Beasts is an engaging and entertaining new episode of PBS’s hit wildlife series that deserves consideration for a spot on any critic’s list of the year’s top new documentaries.  That is due in part to the wide range of animals and areas that are covered throughout the course of the program.  The program’s pacing and its related transitions, which play into the pacing, make the program that much more worth the watch.  The one negative from which the episode suffers is the covert inclusion of the episode’s preachy message about conservation.  Yes, we as viewers know that we need to take care of the earth and its many great creatures.  The last thing we need in watching such an other wise enjoyable program is to be preached at.  The fact that the program’s script saves that preachy message until its end is really slick. It makes the episode in whole seem like one giant preachy message in whole, which detracts from its presentation.  Thankfully, the impact is not so negative that the episode is unwatchable.  It can’t be ignored either, though.  Keeping all of this in mind, Nature: Nature’s Biggest Beasts is a big success.  It just could have been even bigger if not for that unnecessary, covert preachy aspect.  Either way, it is an episode of Nature that is well worth the watch even with its one con.  The DVD is available now.  More information on this and other episodes of Nature is available online at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/PBSNature

Twitter: http://twitter.com/PBSNature

 

 

 

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There’s No Mystery Why ‘NOVA: Dead Sea Scrolls Detectives’ Is Worth Watching

Courtesy: PBS Distribution/PBS/WGBH

Counterfeiting is big business.  From people making fake money to knockoffs of various clothing and apparel items to even fake paintings and more, counterfeiters work hard to separate people from their money and cheat them in the process.  For all of the counterfeited items that are out there, one might never expect someone to go as far as to counterfeit some of the most significant artifacts in history, but sadly, even that happens.  In the new episode of its new hit science-based series NOVA, Dead Sea Scrolls Detectives PBS examines the counterfeiting of fragments of the Dead Sea Scrolls and how the fakes are found.  This story is the most important of the episode in its recent home release, and will be discussed shortly.  The firsthand explanations of how the fakes are created and uncovered adds even more interest to the DVD’s presentation.  It will be discussed a little later.  The overall content featured in the DVD makes its average price point such that audiences will not mind paying.  When this is considered along with all of the content, the whole of this episode of NOVA proves to be a presentation that leaves no mystery as to its appeal.

NOVA: Dead Sea Scrolls Detectives is a presentation whose appeal is wide to say the least.  That is proven through a variety of clues, just one of which being its primary content.  That content, its story, goes a long way toward making it well worth the watch.  The story takes audiences in to the history of the Dead Sea Scrolls’ discovery and the eventual trend of people capitalizing on the importance of the scrolls.  Audiences will be surprised to learn the lengths to which counterfeiters have gone and will go to trick people.  Just as interesting to learn through the interviews is that apparently there’s a code among some overseas in terms of identifying the counterfeiters.  It truly is disturbing to see that there are those who are willing to protect counterfeiters.  As the story progresses, audiences discover the reach of the fakes and how easy it is for counterfeiters to get away with their crimes, and the lengths to which experts will go to uncover those fakes.  The story in whole will appeal not only to biblical experts and theologians, but to fans of crime dramas.  Those behind the episode should be applauded as it would have been so easy for them to go over the top with this and make it something that it was not.  Luckily, that did not happen here, and in turn, it ensured audiences would remain engaged throughout from start to end.

While the formatting of NOVA: Dead Sea Scrolls Detectives and the story itself do a lot to make this episode of NOVA worth the watch, those collective elements are just one part of what makes the program so interesting.  The firsthand displays of how the counterfeit fragments of the Dead Sea Scrolls are identified will keep viewers engaged and entertained, too.  The segments showing how the writing on the parchments is so closely scrutinized are enlightening to say the very least.  Listening to the investigation into the writing and something as minute as the salt crystals on the parchments shows the painstaking lengths to which counterfeiters will go to trick people.  It really is a good starting point in discussions on how forensic science works.  The reaction by the victims and the investigator to the revelation of which fragments are fake adds even more interest to this aspect of the episodes.  The further investigation into how a burned scroll was “brought back to life” adds even more interest to the presentation.  Seeing how technology can be used to virtually unravel and read parchment that is otherwise destroyed shows how far technology has advanced for this and other purposes.  That display alone is eye-opening and will assuredly keep viewers engaged.  Keeping in mind the engaging and entertaining primary and secondary content featured in this documentary, it makes the presentation’s average price point such that audiences will not mind paying that price.

The average price point of NOVA: Dead Sea Scross Detectives is $19.49.  That price was obtained by averaging prices listed at Amazon, Walmart, Target, Best Buy, Books-A-Million and PBS’ online store.  Barnes & Noble Booksellers did not have the DVD listed at the time of this review’s posting.  The only listings that exceed that average are at Books-A-Million, at $24.99 and PBS’ store, $19.99.  PBS’ store listing barely breaks that cap, too.  The most commonly-listed and least expensive pricing is $17.99.  It is listed at Amazon, Walmart, Target and Best Buy.  Simply put, the pricing for this DVD is affordable and worth the price at that considering its content.  It doesn’t even reach the 420 mark for the most part.  To that end, audiences will find this aspect just as appealing as the content featured within the DVD.  All things considered, consumers and audiences will agree that through investigation, it becomes clear that NOVA: Dead Sea Scrolls Detectives proves to be an enjoyable new episode of one of PBS’ best series.

NOVA: Dead Sea Scrolls Detectives is one more example of why PBS’ hit science-based series is such a popular program.  That is proven in part through the program’s primary content, it’s story, which focuses on the lengths to which some people will go to create fakes of anything.  The secondary content, showing the work put into stopping counterfeiters from defrauding consumers and people in general adds even more interest to the program.  The whole of the primary and secondary content makes the DVD’s average price point relatively affordable and welcome for audiences and consumers.  Each item noted here is important in its own way to the whole of this presentation.  All things considered, they make NOVA: Dead Sea Scrolls Detectives anything but a mystery in terms of its appeal.  More information on this and other episodes of NOVA is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NOVApbs

Twitter: http://twitter.com/novapbs

 

 

 

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Every Family Will Welcome The Berenstain Bears’ Second Season Set Into Their Own Houses

Courtesy: PBS Distribution/PBS/PBS Kids

The Berenstain Bears have, for decades, entertained and educated adults and children of all ages.  Between the countless books that have been released, the short-lived animated series from 1985 (which is available now in full on DVD) and the 2003 series, which ran for three seasons, families across the nation (and world) have come to love Papa, Mama, Brother and Sister, their stories and life lessons.  This spring, that enjoyment will continue when PBS Distribution releases the third collection of episodes from the 2003 series on DVD.  The two-disc set is scheduled for release May 19.  While audience await the arrival of that collection, they have the second collection, released Jan. 28, to enjoy.  The Berenstain Bears: Tree House Tales Volume 2 is a wonderful collection that every family will enjoy partly because of its featured stories, which will be discussed shortly.  The lessons tied to the stories add even more to the set’s enjoyment and will be discussed a little later.  Keeping in mind the value of the set’s collective primary and secondary content, the whole of The Berenstain Bears: Tree House Tales Volume 2 boasts an average price point, that is notable in its own right.  Each item noted here is important in its own right to the whole of the double-disc set.  All things considered, they make the collection a presentation that is one of this year’s top new family DVD/BD box sets.

The Berenstain Bears: Tree House Tales Volume 2 is a wonderful presentation that families everywhere will welcome in their own houses.  That is due in part to the stories that are featured in this set.  Approximately 26 stories make up the body of the two-disc collection.  Those stories are in fact the whole of the series’ second season.  They are presented in the exact same chronological order in which they originally aired, too, from July 14, 2003 and July 30, 2003.  Keeping this in mind, it is a bit of a headscratcher as to why this collection wasn’t just called “Season Two” instead of “Volume Two.”  Using the title “Volume Two” becomes somewhat misleading, considering that said term “volume” is typically used for compilation sets rather than full season sets.  The same approach was used in the series’ debut “volume,” which was released Sept. 17.  The stories themselves find the Bear family – Papa, Mama, Sister and Brother – dealing with a variety of very real life situations, making them relatable to audiences of all ages.  The story at the center of “Too Much Pressure,” for instance, finds the Bear family trying to figure out its overly-crowded weekly schedule.  What family out there doesn’t deal with that issue?  Exactly.  The season’s opener, ‘The Excuse Note’ is something that, again, audiences of all ages can appreciate because we have all been there.  Sister tries to lie to get out of gym class because she doesn’t enjoy it.  This is also a plot element that has been used multiple times before and since this episode’s airing.  We’ve all tried to figure out ways out of things we don’t want to do, which is ties to the story’s lesson.  This will be addressed a little later.  Getting back on topic, “The Perfect Fishing Spot” finds Papa and Sister heading out to get the perfect fish for a special dinner.  This leads to another key lesson that is featured within the season.  Between these and so many other stories featured in the second season of The Berenstain Bears, the stories that make up the series’ second season give audiences more than enough reason to bring this set home.

The stories that make up the body of The Berenstain Bears’ second season go a long way toward making this collection worth owning for any family.  They are just one key aspect of the set that makes its presentation so appealing.  The lessons that are tied into each story are themselves critical to the set’s presentation, too.  As noted already, Papa learns his own valuable lesson in “The Perfect Fishing Spot” He learns that the biggest prize isn’t the best and that he needs to make sure he keeps his focus when he says he is doing something for someone else.  This is something with which we all deal with all the time.  We start out wanting to do something nice for someone else, but somewhere along the line, we end up losing that focus and start focusing on what we want.  That is what happens here with Papa.  He admits in the end that is what has happened as he tries to get the biggest fish possible for the grandparents’ special dinner.  He admits he started trying to find the perfect fishing spot (and fish) more for himself than for them.  It takes Sister reminding Papa for him to realize what he was doing.  The lesson that Papa learns is not the only one involving priorities.  He also learns what happens when he puts winning over friendship in “The Prize Pumpkin.”  That lesson is one to which audiences of all ages can relate.

Papa isn’t the only member of the Bear family to learn some valuable lessons this season.  Brother and Sister learn a lesson about friendship in “Ferdy Factual.”  The duo leans that some people deal with their feelings in different ways and don’t always mean to act rude to others.  It’s just that they struggle to come to terms with their discomfort in certain situations.  Dealing with that issue is just a matter of being nice to those people and maybe they will open up and be nicer.  The cubs also learn in this season, the invaluable lesson that helping others can actually help one feel very good inside.  That lesson comes in two different episodes – “Lend A Helping Hand” and “Nothing To Do.”  The whole family leans an equally invaluable lesson in “Too Much Pressure” about the importance of setting limits and priorities in life, not just in terms of setting weekly schedules, in “Too Much Pressure.”  It’s yet another key lesson that will always be timely and relatable.  Considering the importance of that lesson, those featured in the other noted episodes and in the rest of the season’s episodes, it becomes clear why the lessons featured in this season are just as important to its presentation as the stories to which they are tied.  Keeping that in mind, it becomes clear that the primary and secondary content featured in this collection does a lot to make the set well worth owning.  It also makes the set’s average price point money well spent.

The average price point for The Berenstain Bears: Tree House Tales Volume 2 is $11.65.  That price is reached by averaging prices at Amazon, Walmart, Target, Best Buy, Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Books-A-Million and PBS’ online store.  None of the set’s price even reaches $15, and the least expensive of the listings is at Target — $8.69 – while the most expensive of the listings is at Books-A-Million and at PBS’ store, at $14.99.   Walmart’s listing of $8.77 makes a good middle ground.  The $9.99 listing at Amazon and Best Buy are easy on the bank account, too.  Even if audiences choose PBS’ store or Barnes & Noble Booksellers, they still won’t break the bank.  That is the most important thing to consider here.  Regardless of which route audiences go, the price is anything but prohibitive.  It is a price that is accessible for every consumer.  Keeping this in mind, the affordable price point of this set and its primary and secondary content makes this second season set from The Berenstain Bears another welcome addition to any home.

PBS Distribution’s latest Berenstain Bears season collection is a presentation that every family will happily welcome in their own houses.  That is due to the set’s stories and their related lessons, which are all timeless in their own right.  The set’s affordable average price point makes that set that much more appealing.  Neither the set’s average price point, nor its singular prices are price prohibitive.  The most expensive listing from the major retailers is $14.99, which is relatively affordable for anyone.  Keeping all of this in mind, The Berenstain Bears: Tree House Tales Volume Two is a presentation that deserves to be in any family’s house.  More information on this DVD, PBS distribution’s upcoming release of Tree House Tales Volume Three and all of the latest Berenstain Bears news is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.berenstainbears.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/berenstainbears

Twitter: http://twitter.com/TheBerenstains

 

 

 

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PBS Presenting New Da Vinci Profile In New ‘Nova’ Episode

Courtesy: PBS Distribution/PBS/WGBH

PBS will present a new profile of legendary artist and inventor Leonardo da Vinci this month in a new episode of NOVA.

NOVADecoding da Vinci is scheduled for release Tuesday on DVD.  The new episode of the network’s hit science-based series examines, on the 500th anniversary of his death, how he created his artworks and inventions. From dissecting humans to to studying optics to developing some of the earliest flying and war machines and the creation of his famed painting, the Mona Lisa, the program goes into depth examining his work.

NOVADecoding da Vinci will retail for MSRP of $24.99 and can be ordered at a reduced price of $19.99 through PBS’ online store.  More information on this and other episodes of NOVA is available online now at:

 

Website: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NOVApbs

Twitter: http://twitter.com/novapbs

 

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Amazon Prime Video Channel Streaming New Collection Of ‘Dinosaur Train’ Episodes; ‘Molly Of Denali,’ ‘Arthur’ Episodes Coming

Courtesy: PBS/PBS Kids/Amazon

PBS Kids is streaming more episodes of Dinosaur Train on the PBS Kids Amazon Prime Video Channel.

Dinosaur TrainVolume 10 started streaming Friday. The five-episode collection features the episodes ‘The Tiny-Saur Train/How Many Horns,’ ‘Don’s Hole-iday’/’We’re Not All Dinosaurs,’ ‘Gilbert The Conductor’/A Clubhouse of Their Own,’ ‘Mom Was A Kid Once (Parts 1 & 2)’ and ‘A Brand New Species (Parts 1 & 2).’

This latest collection of episodes takes the Pteranodon kids off to China for one episode.  In yet another episode, the kids meet a new friend who happens to be a small mammal named Adele Alphadon.  ‘A Treehouse of their Own’ finds the Pteranodon kids wanting a place of their own to hang out that is separate from that of the neighbors.  The kids eventually find the right materials to build their treehouse, thanks to help from their mom.

Courtesy: PBS Kids/PBS/Amazon

The Dinosaur Train episodes that are streaming now via the PBS Kids Amazon Prime Video Channel will help audiences pass the time until the premiere of Molly of Denali Volume Four and the new Arthur special, ‘The Rhythm and Roots of Arthur.’  The prior is scheduled to start streaming Jan. 17 and will feature five episodes from the fledgling series while the latter is scheduled to start streaming Jan. 21.

Molly of Denali Volume Four will feature the episodes ‘Northern Lights/Fiddlesticks,’ ‘Mollyball/Visit Qyah,’ ‘The Night Manager/Not So Permafrost,’ ‘Tooth or Consequences’/Qyah Spy’ and ‘Ice Scuplture/Tale of the Totem.’

‘Northern Lights’ presents Molly working to introduce her friend Trini to the famed Northern Lights after Trini confesses she has never seen them in person.  Molly and her friends make up their own game called ‘Mollyball’ in the aptly-named episode after wet cements ruins plans by Molly and her friends to play a game of basketball.

Courtesy: PBS Kids/PBS/Amazon

In Arthur‘s new movie ‘The Rhythm and Roots of Arthur,’ Arthur learns an important lesson about family and about music, culture and history when he and his family take a trip to visit his Great-Grand Uncle Theo.  Theo is celebrating his 85th birthday, and as the family celebrates, Arthur leans that life in the country is dramatically different from life in the city.

‘The Rhythm and Roots of Arthur’ runs one hour.

More information on these collections and the latest news from PBS Kids is available online at:

 

Website: http://www.pbskids.org

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/PBSKIDS

 

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