Trivium’s latest LP Will Leave Listeners Having Plenty To Say In The Best Way

Courtesy: Roadrunner Records

Hard rock band Trivium returned this week with its ninth full-length studio recording.  The 10-song record is a strong new presentation from the band that will find a wide appeal among audiences through its musical arrangements and diverse lyrical themes.  From the band’s familiar metalcore sounds to heavier sounds, the record’s musical arrangements offer their own share of interest for audiences.  One of the most notable of the album’s featured songs that joins those elements comes late in the record’s run in the form of ‘Bending the Arc to Fear.’  It will be addressed shortly.  ‘Catastrophist,’ the album’s lead single is another work that does well in joining those two elements, and will be addressed a little later.  ‘Bleed Into Me’ is yet another example of the band’s ability to solidly join musical and lyrical content to keep listeners engaged again this time out.  It is just one more way in which What The Dead Men Say shows its overall strength.  When it is considered along with the other two songs noted here and the rest of the record’s works, the album in whole proves to be a viable choice for a spot on any critic’s list of the year’s top new hard rock and metal albums.

Trivium’s latest full-length studio recording – its ninth overall and eighth consecutive record distributed through Roadrunner Records – is another strong new offering from the band.  The album presents a wide range of musical arrangements and lyrical themes, offering listeners plenty to appreciate once again.  ‘Bending the Arc to Fear’ is just one way in which those statements are supported.  The song’s musical arrangement stands out because at points, its guitar riffs and time keeping couple with its vocals to create a powerful death metal style approach.  Within the same song, audiences also get something of a more metalcore approach.  The two genres are balanced well against one another, with the result being one of the album’s strongest arrangements.  It is just one part of what makes the song stand out.  That heaviness couples with the song’s equally impacting lyrical content to make the song stand out even more.

While the title ‘Bending the Arc to Fear’ could easily be construed to reflect everything going on in the world right now (bending the curve, etc.) audiences will be glad to know that it has nothing to do with that topic.  Rather, it has to do with the lack of personal privacy that humans have nowadays.  Simply put, it is inferred to address the overreach of “big brother.”  That is inferred right from the song’s outset as front man Matt Heafy sings, “A strain of vigilance/Deep roots that all connect/We wait so diligent/Watching you/An engine of suspicion/A web you can’t escape/Crossing all lines to listen/Breaking through/Prey upon you/The weak inherit all our scorn/Prey upon you/The fragile bones now ripped and torn/These eyes show you/Bending the arc to fear/This heart will prove/Bending the art to fear.”  From there, the chorus repeats itself, so there is in fact only one verse here coupled with the chorus.  Heafy’s screams throughout are skin to the sound of Hatebreed front man Jamey Jasta’s vocals.  Yes, it sounds odd, but it works, considering the work of Heafy’s band mates.  The noted theme of loss of personal privacy is relatively clear as Heafy makes note of “Deep roots that connect” and “An engine of suspicion/A web you can’t escape/Crossing all lines to listen.”  It all comes across as making mention of how we as a people are being monitored everywhere we go.  Considering the issues of illegal wiretapping, facial recognition, smart phones being used to trace people’s travel and other related items that rose to attention in the early 2000s, this content holds water.  It’s not some conspiracy theory.  It is real life.  The anger over this among the matter that is exhibited both lyrically and musically in a fashion that will connect well with listeners.  Keeping that in mind, the song in whole leaves no doubt as to why it is one of the record’s most notable works.  It is just one of the album’s most notable songs.  ‘Catastrophist,’ the lead single from Trivium’s new album, is another of the LP’s most notable works.

‘Catastrophist’ is an interesting addition to Trivium’s new album.  That is because of how closely similar it is to some of Slipknot’s more melodic hard rock opuses.  From the guitars to the drums and right down to Heafy’s own vocals, it would be easy for listeners to mistake Trivium for Slipknot in this song because of the close similarity in the sound and style of each band’s work if they took in the song, not knowing it was by Trivium.  As is the case in ‘Bending the Arc to Fear,’ the fiery energy in ‘Catastrophist’ does well in its illustration of the anger exhibited about the world’s ongoing crisis of humanity.

The noted theme is itself exhibited well here.  Heafy sings in the song’s lead verse, “Who has the means to save us from ourselves/To pull us from the vicious cycles feeding back again/Consume and feed/Degenerate/We damage just to liberate/Bought and sold before we could even breathe/I feel like we’re falling/A lifeline just out of our reach/I feel our collapsing/The arrogant numb to our needs/You’re a catastrophe/The one who’s come to devastate/Catastrophist/You stole our innocence/You’re a catastrophe/The one who’s come to devastate/Catastrophist/We never had a chance.”  He continues in the song’s second verse, “How far along before we fade away/So deeply out of focus/But it seems we never cared/Deflect/Deny what flows inside/The poison springs internalize/Bought and sold before we could even breathe.”  Heafy returns to the song’s lead verse and chorus once more as the song progresses through its nearly six-and-a-half-minute run time, pushing home the message again of what we are doing to ourselves and to one another.  Given, it is a familiar message, but it is a message that regardless, never gets old.  That reminder that we need to step back and check ourselves is always welcome, since we as a race are so quick to forget to do just that.  Keeping that in mind, this song proves to be just as engaging and entertaining in the bigger picture of WTDMS as ‘Bending the Arc to Fear’ and the rest of the album’s works.  Even with that in mind, it is just one more of the record’s most notable works.  ‘Bleed Into Me,’ another of the album’s singles, is deserving of its own attention.

‘Bleed Into Me’ presents a musical arrangement that, again can be easily compared to more recent works from Slipknot.  At the same time, it can also be compared to works from the likes of The Veer Union and Sevendust through its melodic hard rock approach.  The song’s foundation is built through its bass line.  That foundation is strengthened through the equally solid time keeping and old school-influenced guitar work.  Heafy’s vocal delivery puts the finishing touch to the presentation.  The tone of the song does well in illustrating the emotion in the song’s lyrical theme, which seems to hint at dealing with some very personal feelings.

The seeming message about addressing unresolved thoughts and feelings is inferred as Heafy sings in the song’s lead (and only) verse, “Bleed into me/An ounce of your empathy/Eyes lock/You can see/A ghost/An invisible city/Bleed into me/Those feelings you’re harboring/The silence says it all/Tragedy/The look before the fall/Struggles and dreams mix into one/The grim rituals have only begun/No use in leaving/I’ll drift off before you are gone/Before you are gone/As it bleeds into me/Let it sink in for you/tell them the story/Tell them the truth.”  From here, Heafy repeats the song’s chorus multiple times over against the work of his band mates.  It seems rather obvious that this song is addressing some unresolved concerns between the subject and another individual.  It goes without saying that this is a topic to which many listeners will relate just as much as the topics in the other songs addressed here.  Considering, again, the emotion generated through the song’s musical arrangement, the two sides work well together to make the song even more powerful. When the impact of this song is considered with that of the other two songs noted here and the rest of the record’s songs, the whole of What The Dead Men Say will leave listeners having plenty to say about the album.

Trivium’s latest full-length studio recording What The Dead Men Say is some of this band’s best work to date.  It is a work whose musical arrangements and its lyrical themes ensure listeners’ engagement and entertainment from beginning to end of the 46-minute presentation.  As noted here, there is a song whose lyrical theme focuses on unresolved personal matters, a song about the current state of the world, and government overreach (for lack of better wording).  The musical arrangements that accompany those themes do their part to heighten the songs’ interest.  As if that is not enough, there is also a song that protests war, one that addresses people who are so willing to walk over all others just for the sake of their own personal success and even one about the matter of the R. Kelly case (supposedly).  Considering all of this, and the lyrical and musical and lyrical content featured in the record’s other songs not addressed here, the end result is a record that is deserving of its own spot on this year’s list of the top new hard rock and metal albums.  More information about What The Dead Men Say is available along with all of Trivium’s latest news and more at:

 

 

Website: http://www.trivium.org

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/Trivium

Twitter: http://twitter.com/TriviumOfficial

 

 

 

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Trivium Debuts ‘Bleed Into Me’ Video

Courtesy: Roadrunner Records

Trivium gave audiences yet another preview of its new album What The Dead Men Say this week.

The band debuted the album’s new song ‘Bleed Into Me‘ Wednesday.  The video is a continuation of sorts from the video that accompanied the album’s lead single, ‘Catastrophist.’

The musical arrangement at the center of ‘Bleed Into Me’ is a heavy,  brooding work that incorporates some old school metal influences into its whole for a song that will connect with listeners. Front man Matt Heaggy’s vocal delivery adds its own touch to the whole of the presentation.  The song’s lyrical content presents its own depth.

The debut of ‘Bleed Into Me’ follows the release, most recently, of another of the album’s songs, ‘Amongst The Shadows and the Stones.’  The band debuted the video for the album’s title track and second single March 26.

The track listing for What The Dead Men Say is noted below.  The album is scheduled to be released Friday through Roadrunner Records.

 

 

WHAT THE DEAD MEN SAY TRACK LISTING:
“IX”
“What The Dead Men Say”
“Catastrophist”
“Amongst The Shadows And The Stones”
“Bleed Into Me”
“The Defiant”
“Sickness Unto You”
“Scattering The Ashes”
“Bending The Arc To Fear”
“The Ones We Leave Behind”

 

Trivium is scheduled to join Megadeth and Lamb of God on their summer tour starting June 12 in Bristow, VA.  The band’s run on the tour is scheduled to go through Aug. 1. Following some time off, Trivium will rejoin Lamb of God and Megadeth starting Oct. 2 in West Palm Beach, FL.  That leg of the tour is scheduled to run through Nov. 13 in Reno, NV.

The bands’ tour schedule is noted below.

 

 

TRIVIUM ON TOUR:
SUMMER 2020:
WITH MEGADETH + LAMB OF GOD:

6/12 — Bristow, VA — Jiffy Lube Live
6/13 — Charlotte, NC — PNC Music Pavilion
6/14 — Raleigh, NC — Red Hat Amphitheater
6/16 — Virginia Beach, VA — Veterans United Home Loans Amphitheater
6/17 — Wantagh, NY — Northwell Health at Jones Beach Theater
6/18 — Camden, NJ — BB&T Pavilion
6/20 — Holmdel, NJ — PNC Bank Arts Center
6/21 — Boston, MA — Rockland Trust Bank Pavilion
6/23 — Syracuse, NY — St. Joseph’s Health Amphitheater at Lakeview
6/24 — Providence, RI — Bold Point Park
6/26 — Darien Center, NY — Darien Lake Amphitheater
6/28 — Burgettstown, PA — S&T Bank Music Park
6/29 — Toronto, ON — Budweiser Stage
7/1 — Detroit, MI — DTE Energy Music Theatre
7/2 — Mount Pleasant, MI — Soaring Eagle Casino Amphitheatre
7/3 — Indianapolis, IN — Ruoff Music Center
7/5 — Atlanta, GA — Ameris Bank Amphitheatre
7/7 — Cincinnati, OH — PNC PAVILION
7/8 — Cleveland, OH — Jacobs Pavilion at Nautica
7/10 — Chicago, IL — Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre
7/11 — St. Louis, MO — Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre
7/12 — Nashville, TN — Nashville Municipal Auditorium
7/14 — Rogers, AR — Walmart AMP
7/16 — Austin, TX — Germania Insurance Amphitheater
7/17 — Houston, TX — The Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion
7/18 — Irving, TX — The Pavilion at Toyota Music Factory
7/20 — Albuquerque, NM — Isleta Amphitheater
7/21 — Phoenix, AZ — Arizona Federal Theatre
7/23 — Irvine, CA — FivePoint Amphitheatre
7/25 — Auburn, WA — White River Amphitheatre
7/26 — Portland, OR — Moda Center
7/29 — Salt Lake City, UT — USANA Amphitheatre
7/30 — Pocatello, ID — Portneuf Health Trust Amphitheatre
8/1 — Concord, CA — Concord Pavilion

FALL 2020:
WITH MEGADETH + LAMB OF GOD:
10/2 — West Palm Beach, FL — iTHINK Financial Amphitheatre
10/6 — Birmingham, AL — Oak Mountain Amphitheatre
10/7 — New Orleans, LA — UNO Lakefront Arena
10/9 — Corpus Christi, TX — American Bank Center Arena
10/11 — El Paso, TX — Don Haskins Center
10/14 — Springfield, MO — JQH Arena
10/16 — Kansas City, MO — Sprint Center
10/21 — Columbus, OH — Schottenstein Center
10/23 — Huntington, WV — Mountain Health Arena
10/24 — Bethlehem, PA — The Wind Creek Event Center
10/27 — Quebec City, QC — Centre Videotron
10/28 — Laval, QC — Place Bell
10/30 — St. Paul, MN — Armory
10/31 — Green Bay, WI — Resch Center
11/2 — Omaha, NE — Baxter Arena
11/3 — Sioux Falls, SD — Denny Sanford PREMIER Center
11/5 — Denver, CO — Pepsi Center
11/7 — Las Vegas, NV — Mandalay Bay Events Center
11/10 — Spokane, WA — Spokane Arena
11/11 — Nampa, ID — Ford Idaho Center Arena
11/13 — Reno, NV — Reno Events Center

 

More information on Trivium’s live dates with Lamb of God and Megadeth, its new album and more is available online now at:

 

 

 

Websitehttp://www.trivium.org

Facebookhttp://www.facebook.com/Trivium

Twitterhttp://twitter.com/TriviumOfficial

 

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

ITM’s Seventh LP Not As Lucky As It Could Have Been

Courtesy: Atlantic/Roadrunner Records

Goth metal outfit In This Moment has, over the course of its life, proven to be a hit among the metal masses.  The band has released six largely well-received and successful albums and toured with some of the biggest names in the rock and metal community.  The band hoped to continue that success when it released its seventh album Mother on March 27.  The result has been the exact opposite with this album, though.  This 14-song record has proven to be the band’s most divisive record yet.  The reason being the band has clearly gone in a starkly different direction this time out than the band’s previous works.  That direction in question is what comes across as a much more mainstream direction.  Gone are the shredding guitars and powerhouse vocals that came to be a trademark of the band’s past albums.  They have been replaced by lots of electronics that at times lead to comparisons to work from the likes of Linkin Park at some points, to thoughts of Korn at others and even other well-known nu-metal acts at others still.  It goes without saying in listening to this record that it is hardly the band’s best album, but at the same time, the band should be applauded for taking a risk and changing things up.  The album is not a complete failure, though.  Late in the record’s 54-minute run, the band gives audiences something at least slightly memorable in the form of ‘God is She.’  This work will be discussed shortly.  ‘As Above So Below’ is another of the works that stands out in this record.  It will be addressed a little later.  ‘The In-Between’ is one more of the record’s most notable entries.  It will also be addressed later.  All three of the songs noted here are interesting work in their own right.  When they are considered along with the rest of the album’s works, the end result becomes an album that while clearly not the band’s best work, is still worth at least one listen.

In This Moment’s latest full-length studio recording Mother is an intriguing new offering from the veteran goth-rock outfit.  That is because stylistically speaking, it is such a stark departure from the band’s previously releases.  Rather than being the decidedly loud, shredding work that those albums were, the band largely opts here for a darker, more brooding approach for the majority of the band’s now seventh album.  While that approach makes up the majority of the album, the album does not stick to just that approach throughout.  There are some heavier moments, such as in ‘God Is She,’ which comes late in the album’s run.  The song’s arrangement does start with the noted brooding approach, but that approach is only used in the opening bars of the song.  Roughly 35 seconds into the song, the song goes full goth-metal, with  heavy, crunching guitars and eerie piano line.  The addition of the more melodic sound of front woman Maria Brink’s vocal delivery rounds out the whole to make this arrangement stand out even more.  The whole of the noted elements makes the song’s arrangement stand out as one of the album’s best compositions, if not the record’s best work.

As much as the song’s musical arrangement does for its presentation, it is just one part of what makes the song stand out against its counterparts.  The song’s lyrical content, set against that musical content, makes the song that much more engaging for listeners.  Bring sings in the song’s lead verse, “I am the God and the devil around you/I am the heaven and the hell you crave/I am the queens and the kings that you bow to/I am the name written on your grave/I am the sun that you bask and feed on/I am the moon that you howl to/I am the daydream bringing faith and conviction/I am the nightmare that you’ve been crawling through/So watch as I set fire to everything/Watch as I burn down everything/Anything/Watch as I destroy you/Watch as I turn into God/Watch as she/Watch as she turns into me.”  She continues in the song’s second verse, “I am the righteous/The touched and holy/I am the voodoo that you want to believe/I am the angels that hold and surround you/I am the demon you’re afraid to need/I am the temple that will bless and feed you/I’m the religion keeping you in chains/I am the cure that you pray will find you/I’m the disease running through your veins.”  This comes across as a female empowerment piece, all things considered.  The very note of “God is she – she is god” in the chorus refrain, along with all of the empowering other statements about burning it all down and essentially being the best and worst of all things, of being that which can give joy and which can give pain, is very powerful.  There is a lot of metaphorical language here, but at least in this critic’s mind, the metaphors come across as the noted statements of giving women a certain strength.  Going back to the song’s musical arrangement, the fire in that content couples with this seeming pro-female message to make this a work that lots of audiences will appreciate.

‘God Is She’ is just one of the works featured in this record that proves the album is worth hearing at least once.  ‘As Above So Below’ is another of the album’s most notable works.  The song’s musical arrangement boasts some of the fiery energy that made the band’s past works such appealing works, yet it goes in a decidedly different direction than those works this time out.  This arrangement is far more accessible for mainstream audiences, with its electronic elements and up-tempo aggro-metal sound.  The up-tempo arrangement boasts elements that make it comparable to songs from the likes of Linkin Park, Rob Zombie and even Sevendust.  Yes, that sounds like quite an odd combination of sounds, but it works here. When it is considered alongside the song’s lyrical content, which presents a seeming social commentary, the song in whole becomes even more powerful.

Brink notes at one point in the song’s chorus refrain what is the most telling portion of the song, “As above, so below/What you reap is what you sow/What you give come back three fold/As above, so below.”  That is pretty much the primary statement of this song.  It is complimented in the song’s lead verse as Brink sings, “I won’t lie/It’s quite tempting/Your handouts and your bones/I wont’ lie/They’re quite empty/Your promises and your stones/If you sell, they’ll buy/Don’t feel, just sign/If you sell, they’ll buy/Don’t think, stay blind/Give me control/Sign on the dotted line/Give me the control/She whispered softly/Give me the control/You’re crawling inside my mind/Give me the control/Don’t you fight me.”  She adds later in the second verse, “Watch me float away/I was never yours to save/It all comes back three fold/As above so below.”  This comes across as a seeming message of a person getting what a person gives.  That is illustrated in the statements about buying and selling, and doing things without thinking about the consequences.  It’s as if Brink is making a statement that whether a person tries to lie to others or lets one’s self be lied to, the consequences will happen.  Again, this is merely one interpretation.  Hopefully it is close to being correct.  The very fact that these lyrics can even generate discussion on such a topic (and discussions in general) shows the importance of said content.  When that seeming message about being aware of the consequences of our actions is coupled with the song’s mainstream radio friendly arrangement, it proves in whole to be another key addition to Mother.  It is not the last of the album’s most notable works.  ‘The In-Between’ is one more of the songs featured in this album that shows it deserves to be heard at least once.

‘The In-Between’ is another nu-metal style opus that might surprise audiences.  Once again, the comparison to works from Linkin Park is distinct.  One could even argue that the song’s arrangement also boasts a comparison to works from Otep.  This might turn off some audiences, while it might appeal to others, especially considering it is a direction that the band has not previously taken.  Again, that the band was willing to take the risk to go in such direction is to be applauded, simply because it is not an approach that the band is known for taking.  The emotional theme in the song’s lyrical content couples with the song’s aggressive musical content to strengthen its presentation even more.

Brink sings in the song’s lead verse, “My mother said that I was holy/My father said that I would burn/My mother said I was an angel/My father said that I would turn/So I believed these words and I turned on myself/’Cause maybe he’s right/maybe I’m worthless/Or maybe he’s wrong and my mother was right/I got a killer in me to give me purpose/Oh, I can feel a holy war/I can feel a holy war within/No, I can’t take a holy war/No, I can’t take a holy war again/Is this what you wanted/I’m gonna bring a little hell/I’m gonna bring a little heaven/You just keep wanting more/With your blood and your whore/I’m gonna bring a little hell/I’m gonna bring a little heaven/It’s a beautiful tragedy/You wanna be sick like me/’Cause I bring a little hell.”  She continues in the song’s second verse, “I was told that I was nothing/yet I was told that I was so pure/And I was told that I was dirty/yet I was told I was the cure/I ask myself am I God or s***/Am I the high, the low/I’m f****** worth it/And I ask myself/Am I love or hate/You are the reason why I have and why I can’t quit.”  There is little doubt as to what is being addressed here.  This is someone who has gone through a difficult childhood, which is, of course, a familiar lyrical theme of so much rock music.  That aside, it still hits hard here.  That is especially the case as the theme is accompanied by the song’s musical content.  The whole of those elements makes the song that much more notable.  When it is considered with the other two works addressed here, the trio shows without doubt that while Mother may not be the *ahem* mother of all albums from In This Moment, it is not a total loss.

In This Moment’s latest full-length studio recording Mother is a work that is a loss at least for the moment for In This Moment, but not a total loss.  It is a work that despite falling short in taking its risk, still has some positive points, as pointed out here.  Keeping all of this in mind, the album will appeal to In This Moment’s most devoted fans.  In the same vein, more casual fans will find it worth at least one listen.  It is available now.  More information on the album is available online along with all of In This Moment’s latest news and more at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.inthismomentofficial.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/officialinthismoment

Twitter: http://twitter.com/OfficialITM

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Trivium Announces New LP Release, Tour Dates; Debuts Video For LP’s Lead Single

Courtesy: Roadrunner Records

Trivium will release its ninth full-length studio recording next month.

What The Dead Men Say is scheduled for release April 24 through Roadrunner Records.  It will come less than three years after the band released its eighth album The Sin and the Sentence.

In anticipation of the new LP’s release, the band debuted the video for the album’s lead single ‘Catastrophist‘ Thursday.  The video, directed by Ryan Mackfall, is a full cinematic presentation that finds the band — Matt Heafy (vocals, guitar), Corey Beaulieu (guitar), Paolo Gregoletto (bass) and Alex Bent (drums) — watch a woman try to escape a pair of unidentified figures who are pursuing her.  The whole thing is captured on a series of closed circuit cameras, allowing the band to follow all of the events of the chase.

An explanation behind the video’s treatment was not provided in a news release about the video.  What can be said is that the song’s musical arrangement is comparable to works from Stone Sour while the song’s lyrical content, which seems to present a certain commentary of sorts, adds to the song’s interest.  That content is featured with the song’s video.

Heafy talked about the band’s new album in a recent interview.

What The Dead Men Say is everything that is Trivium,” he said.  “On this album, one can hear the proper ingredients of past, present and future Trivium.  The Trivium sound is having everything the band does — on one album.”

Gregoletto added to Heafy’s comments with his own statement.

“With the new album, we took what worked on the The Sin and the Sentence and dialed it all up to 11,” he said.

Beaulieu expanded on his band mates statements.

“We wanted to build on the foundation that we established with the last album,” he said.  “The record has all the elements that are Trivium — along with all of us pushing ourselves creatively.  This led to a highly-inspired and fast-paced writing and recording process that really captures the energy of the band.”

The track listing for What The Dead Men Say is noted below.  Pre-orders for the album are open now.

 

 

WHAT THE DEAD MEN SAY TRACK LISTING:
“IX”
“What The Dead Men Say”
“Catastrophist”
“Amongst The Shadows And The Stones”
“Bleed Into Me”
“The Defiant”
“Sickness Unto You”
“Scattering The Ashes”
“Bending The Arc To Fear”
“The Ones We Leave Behind”

 

 

Trivium will join Megadeth and Lamb of God on their summer tour starting June 12 in Bristow, VA.  The band’s run on the tour is scheduled to go through Aug. 1. Following some time off, Trivium will rejoin Lamb of God and Megadeth starting Oct. 2 in West Palm Beach, FL.  That leg of the tour is scheduled to run through Nov. 13 in Reno, NV.

The bands’ tour schedule is noted below.

 

 

TRIVIUM ON TOUR:
SUMMER 2020:
WITH MEGADETH + LAMB OF GOD:

6/12 — Bristow, VA — Jiffy Lube Live
6/13 — Charlotte, NC — PNC Music Pavilion
6/14 — Raleigh, NC — Red Hat Amphitheater
6/16 — Virginia Beach, VA — Veterans United Home Loans Amphitheater
6/17 — Wantagh, NY — Northwell Health at Jones Beach Theater
6/18 — Camden, NJ — BB&T Pavilion
6/20 — Holmdel, NJ — PNC Bank Arts Center
6/21 — Boston, MA — Rockland Trust Bank Pavilion
6/23 — Syracuse, NY — St. Joseph’s Health Amphitheater at Lakeview
6/24 — Providence, RI — Bold Point Park
6/26 — Darien Center, NY — Darien Lake Amphitheater
6/28 — Burgettstown, PA — S&T Bank Music Park
6/29 — Toronto, ON — Budweiser Stage
7/1 — Detroit, MI — DTE Energy Music Theatre
7/2 — Mount Pleasant, MI — Soaring Eagle Casino Amphitheatre
7/3 — Indianapolis, IN — Ruoff Music Center
7/5 — Atlanta, GA — Ameris Bank Amphitheatre
7/7 — Cincinnati, OH — PNC PAVILION
7/8 — Cleveland, OH — Jacobs Pavilion at Nautica
7/10 — Chicago, IL — Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre
7/11 — St. Louis, MO — Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre
7/12 — Nashville, TN — Nashville Municipal Auditorium
7/14 — Rogers, AR — Walmart AMP
7/16 — Austin, TX — Germania Insurance Amphitheater
7/17 — Houston, TX — The Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion
7/18 — Irving, TX — The Pavilion at Toyota Music Factory
7/20 — Albuquerque, NM — Isleta Amphitheater
7/21 — Phoenix, AZ — Arizona Federal Theatre
7/23 — Irvine, CA — FivePoint Amphitheatre
7/25 — Auburn, WA — White River Amphitheatre
7/26 — Portland, OR — Moda Center
7/29 — Salt Lake City, UT — USANA Amphitheatre
7/30 — Pocatello, ID — Portneuf Health Trust Amphitheatre
8/1 — Concord, CA — Concord Pavilion

FALL 2020:
WITH MEGADETH + LAMB OF GOD:
10/2 — West Palm Beach, FL — iTHINK Financial Amphitheatre
10/6 — Birmingham, AL — Oak Mountain Amphitheatre
10/7 — New Orleans, LA — UNO Lakefront Arena
10/9 — Corpus Christi, TX — American Bank Center Arena
10/11 — El Paso, TX — Don Haskins Center
10/14 — Springfield, MO — JQH Arena
10/16 — Kansas City, MO — Sprint Center
10/21 — Columbus, OH — Schottenstein Center
10/23 — Huntington, WV — Mountain Health Arena
10/24 — Bethlehem, PA — The Wind Creek Event Center
10/27 — Quebec City, QC — Centre Videotron
10/28 — Laval, QC — Place Bell
10/30 — St. Paul, MN — Armory
10/31 — Green Bay, WI — Resch Center
11/2 — Omaha, NE — Baxter Arena
11/3 — Sioux Falls, SD — Denny Sanford PREMIER Center
11/5 — Denver, CO — Pepsi Center
11/7 — Las Vegas, NV — Mandalay Bay Events Center
11/10 — Spokane, WA — Spokane Arena
11/11 — Nampa, ID — Ford Idaho Center Arena
11/13 — Reno, NV — Reno Events Center

 

More information on Trivium’s live dates with Lamb of God and Megadeth, its new album and more is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.trivium.org

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/Trivium

Twitter: http://twitter.com/TriviumOfficial

 

To keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Joyous Wolf Debuts ‘Quiet Heart’ Video

Courtesy: Roadrunner Records

Joyous Wolf debuted the video for its latest single this week.

The band debuted the video for its single ‘Quiet Heart’ Friday through Loudwire.  The video features the band performing its new single in an otherwise dim set lit strategically by a series of lights.  the song’s arrangement crosses the band’s classic rock influences with a more modern mainstream sound that will appeal widely to rock audiences.  Joyous Wolf front man Nick Reese talked about the video’s concept and the song’s lyrical content in his interview with Loudwire.

‘Quiet Heart’ is taken from Joyous Wolf’s debut EP Place in Time, which was released in April through Roadrunner Records.  The band is touring in support of the record alongside veteran rock band Deep Purple.

The bands’ tour is scheduled to make a stop in Houston, TX on Monday; New Orleans, LA on Tuesday; Orlando, FL on Thursday; St. Petersburg, FL on Friday and Atlanta, GA on Sunday.  The tour does not end there.  It continues into October.  The tour’s schedule is noted below.

JOYOUS WOLF ON TOUR:
WITH DEEP PURPLE:

9/23 — Houston, TX — Revention Music Center
9/24 — New Orleans, LA Saenger Theatre
9/26 — Orlando, FL — Walt Disney Theatre at Dr. Phillips Center for Performing Arts
9/27 — St. Petersburg, FL — Mahaffey Theater
9/29 — Atlanta, GA — Coca-Cola Roxy
9/30 — Nashville, TN — Andrew Jackson Hall
10/2 — Washington, DC — Warner Theatre
10/4 — Monticello, NY — Resorts World Catskills
10/5 — Boston, MA — Orpheum Theater
10/8 — New York, NY — Beacon Theatre – NY
10/9 — Uncasville, CT — Mohegan Sun Convention Center
10/10 — Upper Darby, PA — Tower Theater
10/11 — Sacramento, CA — Discovery Park
10/12 — Indianapolis, IN — Murat Theatre at Old National Centre
10/13 — Milwaukee, WI — Riverside Theatre
10/15 — Detroit, MI — Fox Theatre Detroit
10/16 — Northfield, OH — MGM Northfield Park
10/18 — Rosemont, IL — Rosemont Theatre

More information is available on Joyous Wolf’s new video, tour and more at:

 

Websitehttp://placeintime.joyouswolf.com

Facebookhttp://www.facebook.com/joyouswolf

Twitterhttp://twitter.com/joyouswolfmusic

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Joyous Wolf Carves Out Its Own “Place” In 2019’2 New EP Field With ‘Place In Time’

Courtesy: Roadrunner Records

Rock band Joyous Wolf has been making quite the name for itself since first breaking out last year.  The band has released a handful of singles and is currently making its way across America with Buckcherry.  With each new step, Joyous Wolf’s name keeps getting even bigger, and on Friday, the excitement over the band reached its peak as the band released its debut EP Place in Time through Roadrunner Records.  The almost half-hour record is an interesting offering in that the seven songs that make up its 27-minute run time lend themselves stylistically to bands, such as Pearl Jam, Seven Mary Three and Soundgarden, just to name a few bands.  One could even argue that there are comparisons to Buckcherry present at points in the EP, too.  Keeping in mind that wide range of sounds, the record’s musical content alone is certain to generate a wide appeal for the record.  The album’s lyrical content does just as much to make the record appealing.  The record’s opener ‘Had Enough’ is just one of the songs that serves to illustrate those statements.  It will be addressed shortly.  The EP’s title track is another notable addition to its whole, and will be addressed a little later.  ‘Mother Rebel,’ the EP’s penultimate entry, is yet another song that serves to show how the record’s musical and lyrical content collectively keep listeners engaged and entertained.  When it is considered along with the other songs noted here and the rest of the EP’s compositions, the whole of Place in Time becomes a work that is certain to carve out its own place in today’s rock and roll realm.

Joyous Wolf’s debut EP Place in Time is a good first effort from the up-and-coming California-based rock and roll outfit.  It is a record that is certain to appeal to its target audience through its straight forward rock and roll arrangements and equally accessible lyrical content within each of its seven songs.  The EP’s opener ‘Had Enough’ is just one of the ways in which the noted statements are proven.  The song’s mid-tempo 4/4 arrangement is everything that any active rock radio programmer looks for.  That is proven with the steady time keeping from drummer Robert Sodaro.  Sodaro’s work forms the song’s foundation while guitarist Blake Allard adds his own touch to the song with his classic-rock influenced riffs.  Front man Nick Reese’s vocal delivery and sound meanwhile lend themselves to comparisons to the likes of Pearl Jam front man Eddie Vedder and the late Soundgarden front man Chris Cornell.  Bassist Greg Braccio puts the finishing touch to the arrangement, bringing everything together in one whole.  All things considered, the song’s arrangement creates a sound and feel that is certain to have wide-ranging appeal.  It is just one part of what creates that appeal.  The confidence in the song’s lyrical content adds to that appeal.

Reese sings in the song’s lead verse, “Reminisce/I won’t miss/How they’ve made me shiver/I’ll admit/I know this of myself/Won’t submit/Hypocrite/Or at least consider/I don’t fit/I don’t walk with this crowd.”  He continues in the song’s chorus, I’m a man/Now I’m gonna light you up/Taking over/Gonna let it all go/Had enough/I’ve shut you up/Why don’t you just go home/Had enough/I’ll shut you up/Why don’t you leave me alone/I’ve had enough/So I’ve shut you up.”  He adds in the song’s second verse, “Counterfeit/It’s a trip/Not a true contender/But it’s a lovely place to raise your kids/Bottle it/Cradle it/ The elite pretenders/And I swear you won’t fool me again.”  He even goes so far as to tell someone, “why don’t you drop dead” in the song’s third verse.  It is clear that the song’s subject has had enough of someone(s) through these verses, and is voicing that frustration here.  The fire in that voiced frustration couples with the fire in the song’s arrangement to make the whole a work that is a strong first statement from the band in this record.  It makes the song just one of the works that makes the EP in whole stand out, too.  The record’s title track is one more example of what makes Joyous Wolf’s new EP stand out in this year’s field of new EPs.

‘Place in Time’ stands out in part due to its musical arrangement.  The arrangement at the center of this nearly four-minute rocker is a steady, driving composition that conjures thoughts of Buckcherry and touches of Led Zeppelin just to name a couple of acts with similar sounds.  That’s not a bad thing either.  Unlike with some other bands out there *coughs Greta Van Fleet* the similarity here is not a blatant rip off of the songs that seemingly influenced this work.  Rather they served as a starting point for the band to craft its own opus.  Keeping this in mind, the song’s arrangement in itself does plenty to keep listeners engaged and entertained.  It is just one of the elements deserving of attention here.  The song’s lyrical content is just as important to its whole as its musical arrangement.

What makes the song’s lyrical content stand out is that it comes across as presenting a theme of self-confidence and realization, so to speak.  That is partially evident in the song’s lead verse, in which Reese sings, “I’m growing up/I’m growing out/I’m gonna write just what my story’s about/Picture me in my own world/Picture me/Live how you want to live/You want to live/I want to live/In my place and time.”  He is saying he has become his own person, adding people in general should be their own individuals.  He adds in the song’s second verse, “I’m reaching in/I’m feeling down/Too many people bitching/They don’t even use their mouths/Picture me in my world/Live how you want to live/I want to live/In my place in time.”  He goes on to repeat that final statement time and again following the song’s bridge, reminding listeners to live for themselves.  It’s not the first time – again – that any band has promoted individuality.  That aside, it still manages to translate well in this case.  At the same time, it also manages to resonate well with listeners because of that accessibility.  When this is considered along with the radio ready nature of the song’s arrangement, both elements together make the song yet another example of why Place in Time is a strong new offering from Joyous Wolf.  It is hardly the last example of what makes the record stand out.  ‘Mother Rebel’ is another notable addition to the EP.

‘Mother Rebel,’ the EP’s penultimate song, is another example of what makes Place in Time a strong first offering from the band.  Much like ‘Had Enough’ stands out in part because of the song’s arrangement, so does this work.  Right off the bat, the song’s arrangement conjures thoughts of Seven Mary Three’s hit song ‘Cumbersome’ thanks to Allard’s work on guitar and Sodaro’s work behind the kit.  The two arrangements, while not exact musical mirror images of one another, are eerily similar.  Whether that is good or bad is left up to listeners’ own thoughts.  What sets the two apart is the addition of the southern rock edge to the arrangement in ‘Mother Rebel.’  Keeping that in mind, the arrangement still works and will appeal to listeners, despite that close similarity to Seven Mary Three’s song.  It is just one part of what makes the song stand out.  The song’s lyrical content serves to make it stand out, too.

The song’s lead verse reads, “Stone free/Maybelline/Writes it her way/I’m told that’s insane, yeah/The ancient came to you/Right beside the rebel lead/Somebody better know how you sting/Then the people started talking/Seems the rebs weren’t very keen/On what you wrote inside a binding/Stressed belief.”  The song continues in its second verse, “Yeah, there she goes/Break through Mrs. Brave/Hold them to the mark/Only you could go light that spark now/But oh those boys/They walk with malice/And not a one would walk without us/You now it’s all about what you have got/Then the people started marching/Men in gray and blue were border bound/For what was right/They thought was wronging/Kill your brother and friends.”  It would seem that in considering all of this, the song focuses on the female spies of the civil way, or maybe even one in particular – one Sarah Emma Edmonds, who was a spy for the Union troops.  Of course all this could be completely off the mark, so it should not be taken as anything more than this critic’s own interpretation of the lyrics.  If it is at least somewhere in the proverbial ballpark, then it certainly makes for a very interesting topic.  It would make the band hardly the first ever to mix history and music.  That aside, it still makes for an interesting song in its own right.  To that end, whatever the song’s true lyrical them here, the discussion that it is certain to generate through that sole element is more than enough proof of why it is one of the EP’s most notable entries, but still not the last of the record’s most notable works.  When it is considered along with ‘Place in Time,’ ‘Had Enough’ and the rest of the record’s entries, the EP in whole proves itself a work that carves its own place (yes, that awful pun was intended) in this year’s field of new EPs.

Joyous Wolf’s new EP Place in Time is a good offering from the up-and-coming rock and roll outfit from California.  That is because it balances quite well, elements of class and modern rock and roll for a musical whole that gives it wide appeal.  The record’s lyrical themes generate just as much interest as its musical arrangements.  Both statements are evidenced in all three of the songs noted here.  Much the same can be said of the EP’s other songs not directly discussed here.  All things considered, the record is certain to make listeners joyous.  Place in Time is available now.  More information on Place in Time is available online now along with all of Joyous Wolf’s latest news and more at:

 

 

 

Website: http://placeintime.joyouswolf.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/joyouswolf

Twitter: http://twitter.com/joyouswolfmusic

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

‘Distance Over Time’ Is A Welcome Return To Form For Dream Theater

Courtesy: Inside Out Music

Prog-metal band Dreram Theater recently released its 14th full-length studio recording to the masses.  The album, Distance Over Time, is another strong effort from the band.  The band’s first outing away from Roadrunner Records since the 2005 release of Octavarium (Atlantic Records), is a positive return to form for the band.  It has far less of the spit-shined commercial sound of those records that the band released while on Roadrunner’s roster, and more elements of so many of its past albums.  Its lyrical themes are just as interesting as its musical content.  The album’s opener, ‘Untethered Angel’ is just one of the songs featured in the new album that serves to support those statements.  ‘S2N,’ which comes just past the album’s halfway point, does just as much to support the noted statements, and will be addressed a little later.  The album’s finale and bonus track ‘Viper King’ proves just as interesting as ‘S2N’ and ‘Untethered Angel.’  It will be discussed later, too.  Each song is important in its own right to the whole of Distance Over Time.  When they are considered together with the seven other songs not directly addressed here, the whole of the album presents Dream Theater as a band that has finally gotten back up to speed.  Yes, that awful pun was intended.

Veteran prog-metal band Dream Theater has been making music, touring the world and building its fan base for 34 years. The band’s new album Distance Over Time serves as a reminder of all that the band has accomplished in that time, while also reminding listeners the band in whole has no intention of slowing down as it continues to move forward.  This is evidenced in part through the album’s opener and lead single ‘Untethered Angel.’  The song’s musical arrangement is easily comparable to the songs featured in the band’s 1999 album Metropolis Pt. 2: Scenes From A Memory.  That is evident early on in the song’s five-minute plus run time.  The combination of front man James LaBrie’s vocal delivery style along with John Petrucci’s guitar line and Jordan Rudess’ keyboard arrangement couples with Mike Mangini’s work behind the kit to create that sense of a song that would have fit well into that album.  Considering the overall theme of that record, the lyrical theme of this work makes it feel even more like it would belong on that record.

The lyrical theme of ‘Untethered Angel’ centers on someone dealing with a lot of inner turmoil, which is very similar to the past life recollections of the figure at the center of Metropolis Pt. 2: Scenes From A Memory.  Given, the scenario there is not entirely like that presented here, but it is still similar enough that it would work.  LaBrie sings in the song’s lead verse, “You’ve built this world around you/Your universe/In spite of best intentions/Things could not be worse/Chaos and fear have left you hanging by a thread/As you argue with the voice inside your head/Untethered angel/Falling into darkness/Don’t be afraid of letting go/Giving up yourself will set you free.”  He goes on to sing in the song’s second verse, “Misgiving and dismay/Nightmares and wasted days/Can’t live your life this way/Something needs to change/Cold feet and second thoughts/Entangled, tied in knots/Avoidance at all costs/A painful thing to watch.”  From there, he returns to the chorus as the song reaches its bridge and finale.  Overall, the song seems to be addressing someone, again, dealing with a strong inner battle with himself/herself.  Those who recall MP2: SFAM will recall that the subject’s past life had quite a lot held inside.  Yes, it was a different scenario, but it was still a dark past.  To that end, this is still similar enough to the prior record to make it work.  Considering it on its own merits, it works just as well because it serves as a reminder to those going through difficult times in life (who isn’t going through some difficult emotional situations?) that things can get better.  Keeping this in mind along with the song’s fully engaging musical arrangement, the whole of the song becomes a solid started for DOT and just one way in which the album proves itself a strong return to form for the band.  It is just one of the album’s high points, too.  ‘S2N,’ which comes just past the album’s halfway point, does just as much as ‘Untethered Angel’ to show what makes DOT a positive new offering from Dream Theater.

‘S2N’ stands out in part because of its musical arrangement.  Needless to say, the song’s arrangement is classic Dream Theater all the way around.  Bassist John Myung’s impeccable work once again shows why he is nicknamed the octopus.  John Petrucci’s guitar line joins with Myung’s bass line to take listeners back to Dream Theater’s heyday while Mike Mangini’s time keeping and Jordan Rudess’ work on the keys strengthens the foundation even more.  Mangini’s ability to seamlessly keep time while utilizing every single inch of his kit is impressive to say the least.  The whole of the arrangement harkens back to the works featured in the band’s 1997 album Falling Into Infinity while also adding a bit of a modern metal vibe – again thanks to Petrucci – at times.  That element is just one part of what makes the song so engaging and entertaining.  The seeming social commentary contained within the song’s lyrical content adds its own share of interest to the song.

LaBrie sings in the song’s lead verse, “Are we paying attention or are we drifting/Too much negative action/Not enough positive reaction/What’s the state of humanity/Where’s the peace and harmony/Free the signal/Your inner voice/Time to transcend/Block out the noise/Signal to noise becomes the answer/the world keeps turning as we latch onto the wheel.”  He adds in the song’s second verse, “Have you heard the news/A surging sea of circumstance/Pain, starvation, war, abuse/Sterile gloves hide dirty hands/Shocking truth/Climate change/Floods and fires/Hurricanes/Overdose, suicide/Innocent die/Fear and race/Endless lies/Sex and faith, terrorize/Drugs and guns taking lives/Innocent die.”  There is little doubt that this is commentary about the current state of the world, and a wake up call about it all.  Given, it is hardly the first song to ever address how bad things are and the need for people to do something about it.  That does not lessen its impact or importance, as people always need to be reminded and aware so that they do not become complacent about the state of the world.  Things can potentially only get worse if people become complacent.  To that end, this content is just as important as the song’s musical arrangement.  When they are coupled, they make ‘S2N’ another example of how much DOT has to offer audiences.  It is definitely not the last example of the album’s strength.  The album’s finale and bonus track ‘Viper King’ is one more example of that strength.

‘Viper King’ stands out in part because of a musical arrangement that is largely unlike anything the band has previously crafted.  Rudess’ keyboard line and Mangini’s steady hi-hat beat conjures thoughts of Deep Purple as the song opens.  Once the rest of the band comes in, the overall heaviness creates a sense of something similar to some of today’s biggest hard rock acts.  At the same time, that link back to Deep Purple remains throughout.  The whole makes the song’s arrangement perhaps the album’s highest point.  That is because, again, it finds the band moving in what would seem to be previously unexplored territory.  It is a welcome and successful venture.  Of course it is only part of what makes the song overall stand out.  The song’s lyrical content adds its own share of interest, again harkening back to Deep Purple even here.

Looking at the song’s lyrical content, one can’t help but make a comparison to Deep Purple’s Highway Star.’  That is because LaBrie seems to be singing about…well…a car; a Dodge Viper at that, thus the title ‘Viper King.’  He sings in the song’s lead verse, “Venomous by design/Lying idle, biding time/Bore down the clutch/Tore up the road/Six hundred horses/Genetic code/Lightning speed/The road she bends/Slammed down the brakes/Losing my ass end.”  One can’t help but figure that this is something about a car and simply going out driving in said car.  It’s possible that is completely the incorrect assumption, but one can’t help but imagine the noted topic is what is addressed.  The chorus adds to the supposition that the song is “auto-centric,” as LaBrie sings, “Drive on/pushed to the limit/My Viper King/We’re flying high/Drive on/Filled with desire/Nothing to fear/I feel alive/My Viper King.”  He even goes on from there to sing, “Speed demon/Tempting fate/Do or die/in the blink of an eye.”  Once again, if this is not a song about a car, it will definitely be interesting to discover the song’s actually theme.  If it is a song about a car and the simple joys of being behind the wheel on the open road, then it has been presented quite well.  That is just as much the case considering the song’s musical arrangement.  When that element is considered along with the song’s engaging lyrical content, the whole of the song makes for a great final statement from the band on this album, and yet another example of how much the album has to offer.  When the song is considered along with the songs previously discussed here and the rest of the album’s entries, the whole of DOT proves to be a positive return to form for Dream Theater and a sign that the band has finally gotten back up to speed.

Dream Theater’s 14th full-length studio recording Distance Over Time is a welcome return from the veteran prog-metal band.  That is because, having finally parted ways with Roadrunner Records, the band has finally returned to form on this outing.  That is evidenced through all three of the songs discussed here and the rest of the songs not directly addressed.  From start to finish, the album offers longtime fans just as much to appreciate as those who might not be as familiar with the band as those longtime fans.  Simply put, Distance Over Time proves itself to be a record that shows Dream Theater is finally back up to speed and its members have no intention of slowing down for the foreseeable future.  More information on Distance Over Time is available online now along with all of the band’s latest news and more at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.dreamtheater.net

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/dreamtheater

Twitter: http://twitter.com/dreamtheaternet

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.