‘Bridges To Buenos Aires’ Continues To Show Why The Rolling Stones Is One Of Rock’s Elite Acts

Courtesy: Eagle Rock Entertainment

The live recordings keep coming from The Rolling Stones.  Early this month, the band released another concert from its Bridges to Babylon Tour in the form of Bridges To Buenos Aires.  Originally recorded April 5, 1998 at the River Plate Stadium, the 22-song set is yet another enjoyable addition to the home library of any fan of The Rolling Stones.  That is due in part to the show’s set list.  The band’s performance thereof plays its own critical role in the show’s presentation.  The companion booklet that comes with the recording rounds out its most important elements.  Each item noted is key in its own way to the whole of this recording.  All things considered, they make the recording in whole yet another welcome addition to The Rolling Stones’ ongoing series of live recordings.

The Rolling Stones’ latest addition to its ongoing series of live recordings is yet another presentation that audiences will openly welcome into their libraries.  That is due in part to the concert’s set list.  The 22-song set list features many of the same songs featured in the band’s performance from its Bridges To Bremen show, with a handful of changes.  Once again, the band reaches back in its catalog, reaching as far back as 1967.  Fan favorites, such as ‘Start Me Up, ‘It’s Only Rock ‘n’ Roll (But I Like It)’ and ‘Gimme Shelter’ are all featured in this collection.  Others, such as ‘Memory Motel,’ ‘Anybody Seen My Baby’ and ‘Paint It Black’ are replaced here with ‘Sister Morphine,’ ‘When The Whip Comes Down’ and ‘Little Queenie,’ which reaches back to the band’s 1970 album Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out.  The rest of the show’s set list in this concert is the same as that featured in Bridges To Bremen.  For those audiences who do not already own Bridges To Bremen, the expansive set list presents audiences with a rich presentation of the band’s catalog.  Along with that rarely represented album – Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out – the set list also gives nods to the band’s 1969 album Let It Bleed, its 1967 album Between The Buttons and its 1968 album Beggar’s Banquet as well as Bridges To Babylon, on the back of which the band was touring at the time.  Simply put, the set list featured in this collection will appeal to audiences who already own any of the band’s previously released live recordings (released through Eagle Rock Entertainment) and those who might not own said recordings.  It is just one of the recording’s positives.  The band’s performance of the set list plays its own important part to the whole of the recording.

The band’s performance of the concert’s set list is notable because it shows the band as a unit, at the time, that was still at the top of its game, even more than three decades into its life.  The band’s performance of ‘Little Queenie’ is one example of that high level of entertainment.  The swagger exhibited by the band as it makes its way across the hydraulic bridge and energy in its performance is commendable to say the least.  Even as something is thrown at him, front man Mick Jagger doesn’t bat even an eyelash.  He just keeps going, not missing a beat or even giving recognition to whichever audience member threw the unidentified item at him.  Drummer Charlie Watts, decked out in his soccer jersey and guitarists Ronnie Wood and Keith Richards make their way around the band’s second stage with the ease of much younger performers, showing they are right in step with their younger counterparts.  The band members’ energy in the show’s opener – ‘(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction’ — provides just as much show of energy from the band as any other performance from the group.  Jagger struts his way across the stage, giving his full energy and attention to the audience and song at the same time.  Meanwhile Richards and Wood keep such a cool demeanor as they make their way through the song alongside Watts.  Much the same can be said of the band’s performance of ‘Jumpin’ Jack Flash.’  It shows this band even at that point, held its own easily against every one of its younger up-and-coming counterparts, proving once more why it is one of the elite acts in the rock and music community in general.   Between these performances and those of the rest of the shows set, the whole of the band’s performance gives audiences just as much to appreciate here as the set list itself.  It is just one more part of what makes the recording so enjoyable.  The companion booklet that comes with the recording rounds out its most important elements.

The companion booklet that comes with Bridges To Buenos Aires features liner notes composed by Journalist Paul Sexton.  Sexton paints a vivid picture of the concert contained in the presentation’s Blu-ray through his words. He writes in part about the band’s performance of ‘Flip The Switch,’ noting that it “offered the first cameo for now much-missed saxophonist mainstay Bobby Keys.”  He adds later of the performance of ‘Gimme Shelter,’ that vocalist Lisa Fischer’s performance is just as powerful as ever.  There is even mention of Bob Dylan’s surprise guest appearance for the band’s take on his timeless classic ‘Like A Rolling Stone’ in Sexton’s liner notes.  He writes in part here, “Bob’s [Dylan] customarily approximate vocal style certainly kept Mick on on his toes, but the bonhomie of the moment gave further warmth to a set that was growing ever more fierce and forceful.”  Here again is more proof of the power of Sexton’s description of the show, proving even more, the importance of his preview of the concert.  Sexton has much more to add about the concert, but that will be left for audience to discover for themselves.  Between the rest of the notes not discussed here and those items addressed, it goes without saying that Sexton’s notes are recommended to be taken in prior to taking in the concert itself.  Keeping this in mind, the importance of the recording’s liner notes couples with the power of the band’s performance and the importance of the show’s set list to make the recording in whole, yet another positive addition to The Rolling Stones’ ongoing live releases series, and a presentation that any fan of The Rolling Stones will welcome into his or her music library.

The Rolling Stones’ latest addition to its ongoing series of live recordings, Bridges To Buenos Aires is another wonderfully entertaining presentation from the band and Eagle Rock Entertainment.  It is a work that continues to prove why The Rolling Stones remains more than half a century into its existence, one of the rock (and music) community’s elite acts.  That is evidenced partly through the show’s set list.  The band’s performance thereof plays just as much into supporting the noted statements.  The liner notes featured in the recording’s companion booklet does just as much as the set and its performance to show the strength of the recording.  Each item noted here is important in its own way.  All things considered, they make Bridges To Buenos Aires another recording that builds and maintains the band’s bridges to its audiences.  It is available now.  More information on this and other titles from The Rolling Stones is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.rollingstones.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/therollingstones

Twitter: http://twitter.com/RollingStones

 

 

 

More information on this and other titles from Eagle Rock Entertainment is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.eagle-rock.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/EagleRockEnt

Twitter: http://twitter.com/EagleRockNews

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

‘Voodoo Lounge Uncut’ Re-Issue Is Another Success For Eagle Rock, The Rolling Stones

Courtesy: Eagle Rock Entertainment

Eagle Rock Entertainment and The Rolling Stones have been quite busy in recent years, releasing a variety of live recordings from the veteran rock band.  The two sides together, have released no fewer than 10 live recordings from the band’s years on the road.  Late last month, the two sides partnered to release yet another live recording, this time from the band’s 1994 North American tour in support of its then brand new album Voodoo Lounge.  The second new live recording from the two sides so far this year, – the first was the band’s recording No Security: San Jose ’99Voodoo Lounge Uncut is yet another wonderful addition to the collection of any Rolling Stones fan and rock music lover in general.  This is proven in part through the concert’s set list (and the band’s performance thereof), which will be discussed shortly.  The concert’s production is also important to note in examining the recording, and will be addressed a little later.  The companion booklet that is included with the recording rounds out the set’s most important elements, and will also be discussed later.  Each item noted here is important in its own way to the whole of Voodoo Lounge Uncut.  All things considered, they make Voodoo Lounge Uncut yet another must have for any fan of The Rolling Stones fan.

Eagle Rock Entertainment’s recent re-issue of The Rolling Stones’ Voodoo Lounge, aptly titled Voodoo Lounge Uncut, is a welcome new pressing of the recording, which was previously released in edited fashion on laser disc, DVD and VHS.  That is due in no small part to the concert’s set list.  The extensive 27-song set list is the complete presentation of the band’s classic concert, performed at Joe Robbie Stadium in Miami, Florida.  As is noted on the rear of the set’s packaging and in its companion booklet (again, that booklet will be discussed later), this release marks the first time that the expansive set list has been presented in whole.  The concert’s previous pressings featured significantly shortened set lists, which removed a total of 10 songs from the recordings.  In other words, audiences get in this set, the band’s entire show for the first time ever.  While not necessarily career-spanning, the set list featured here still pulls from a respectable portion of The Rolling Stones’ catalog.  Specifically speaking, it pulls from no less than a dozen of the band’s releases, including the band’s 1964 U.S. debut record The Rolling Stones (England’s Newest Hit Makers), its then latest album Voodoo Lounge and other albums, such as 12 X 5, Out Of Our Heads and Exile on Main StreetExile on Main Street is the most heavily represented of the albums featured in the set list, with four nods.  The bonus five-song set, which was recorded at Giants Stadium in New Jersey as part of the Voodoo Lounge tour, features two more songs from that album, bringing the total count there to six songs. Voodoo Lounge got a grand total of five nods between the two sets while Let It Bleed was represented by three songs.  The numbers vary from here, but simply put, the band reaches well back into its back catalog for this show, which is well-deserving of applause.

While the set list itself does a respectable job of representing The Rolling Stones’ catalog, it is just one part of the set list that deserves to be noted.  The set list’s actual order is just as important to the concert experience here as the set list itself.  Audiences will note that the set’s first seven songs are high-energy pieces.  From there, the band slows things down gradually, starting with ‘Beast of Burden.’  The band goes from there, to a short acoustic set that helps relax the concert’s mood.  The band’s performances of ‘It’s All Over Now’ and ‘Who Do You Love?’ – which features the one and only Bo Diddley joining the band for the performance – gradually pick up the concert’s set list again.  The show’s energy gradually increases more and more from there until guitarist Keith Richards takes the lead with performances of ‘Before They Make Me Run’ and ‘The Worst.’  That pullback is only brief, as things gradually pick back up again starting with the laid back vibe of ‘Sympathy for the Devil.’  Each song from there sees the show’s energy rise yet again right to the bombastic finale of ‘Jumpin’ Jack Flash.’  Simply put, the energy in the show’s set shows that a lot of thought and time was put into its sequencing.  The band wanted to make sure that audiences got the most bang for their buck, and it goes without saying that they got that and more, over the course of more than two-and-a-half hours.

While the expansive set list featured in Voodoo Lounge Uncut gives audiences to enjoy and appreciate from this recording, it is only one part of what makes the recording so enjoyable.  The band’s performance – including that of the touring musicians – builds on the foundation formed through the set list to make the recording even more enjoyable.  Front man Mick Jagger has all of the swagger in his performance here that he has had at every other moment in his career while drummer Charlie Watts’ time keeping is just as solid as ever.  Guitarists Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood show throughout the course of the show that, like Jagger, they can still hold their own easily against their younger counterparts, working through every single riff and every single song with ease.  At the same time, the pair’s smiles and swagger as they make their way across the stage from song to song exude their own share of energy on which audiences will feed. Touring bassist Darryl Jones, who according to the recording’s notes joined the band for the first time in the Voodoo Lounge tour, adds his own interest as he shares some light-hearted moments with his fellow musicians as do touring vocalists Lisa Fischer and Bernard Fowler.  Horn players Kent Smith, Bobby Keys, Andy Snitzer and Michael Davis join with keyboardist Chuck Leavell to give each song even more energy thanks to the energy that they put into each performance.  Between their performances and those of the rest of the group, the whole of the musicians’ performances proves just as entertaining as any other performance that The Rolling Stones has presented to audiences in its previous live recordings because of the energy and effort put into entertaining the group’s audiences.  When the collective’s performance is considered along with the set recording’s featured set list the two related items come together to give audiences quite a bit to appreciate in this set.  They are only a portion of what makes Voodoo Lounge Uncut so enjoyable, too.  The concert’s production is just as important to examine as the show’s set and the band’s performance thereof.

The production involved with this recording is important to examine because of its general effect for home viewers.  It is noted in the recording’s companion booklet that this recording was originally presented on pay-per-view in its very first presentation almost 25 years ago.  Taking in the recording here, the production is impressive.  Given there are some shots that are perhaps a little too short, leading to some feelings of dizziness.  Those shots are not enough to make the concert unwatchable, though.  The aerial shots at the concert’s end and the overhead shots from the crane cams give viewers a full sense of just how many people attended the concert.  The various angles from the stage and the crowd do just as much to keep audiences engaged and entertained as they make audiences feel as if they are right there with the rest of the audience.  At times, those behind the cameras even take viewers into the crowd, giving audiences a glimpse into what the audience saw and heard.  On yet another level, the timing of many of the shots even timed almost perfectly with the songs themselves, adding even more impact to each performance, and in turn ensuring even more, audiences’ engagement and entertainment.  Adding even more interest is the attention given to the concert’s audio mix.  The Joe Robbie stadium is a massively open venue, as any National Football League fan knows.  That means that a lot of work had to have been done and time taken to balance every single line.  That work and attention clearly paid off, as did the work and time put in by those who edited down the concert for its presentation here.  No one line overpowers that other at any point throughout the show.  Kudos are in order for all involved, considering this.  This positive joins with the positives in the show’s set and the band’s performance to strengthen the recording’s presentation even more.  It is still not the last of the recording’s most important elements.  The companion booklet, which has previously been noted rounds out the set’s most important items.

The recording’s companion booklet is important in part because of its liner notes.  Composed by Paul Sexton, the liner notes point out that the Voodoo Lounge tour marked the first time that Darryl Jones joined The Rolling Stones as the band’s bassist.  This is important to note because as previously noted, this concert took place almost 25 years ago.  That is a long time for him to have been with the band.  Sexton’s liner notes also point out Jagger’s interest in artist Santiago Calatrava played a part in the look of the set for the band’s show.  As if these notes are not enough, Sexton also highlights thoughts from Sheryl Crow, who joins the band on-stage for one of the show’s three guest appearances.  He quotes Crow as saying how frightened she was to perform with the band because of her respect for the band.  There is even mention of Richard’s time in the limelight and much more.  Between all of that extra and the items noted here, Sexton’s liner notes give audiences a solid, clear introduction to this concert, setting the scene for the performance quite well.  It offers its own enlightenment and entertainment for audiences.  When this positive is considered along with the positives exhibited in the recording’s set list, the band’s performance thereof and the recording’s production, the whole of the recording proves to be yet another standout live offering from The Rolling Stones and Eagle Rock Entertainment.  It continues that positive tradition that was started so long ago from the two sides, ensuring once again that audiences and Rolling Stones fans alike will have plenty to appreciate from beginning to end.

Eagle Rock Entertainment and The Rolling Stones’ latest live recording Voodoo Lounge Uncut is another successful live offering from the two sides in what is a long-running partnership between the two groups.  It is an offering that fans of The Rolling Stones will enjoy just as much as rock fans in general.  This is proven in part through the recording’s extensive 27-song (technically 32-song) set that lifts from a healthy section of the band’s catalog.  The band’s performance of said set list builds on the foundation formed via that list as does the show’s production.  The companion booklet that comes with the recording puts the finishing touch to its presentation, cementing its positive presentation.  Each element is important in its own way to the whole of Voodoo Lounge Uncut.  All things considered, they make this recording yet another wonderful addition to the collection of any Rolling Stones fan.  More information on Voodoo Lounge Uncut is available online now along with all of the Rolling Stones’ latest news and more at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.rollingstones.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/therollingstones

Twitter: http://twitter.com/RollingStones

 

 

 

More information on this and other titles from Eagle Rock Entertainment is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.eagle-rock.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/EagleRockEnt

Twitter: http://twitter.com/EagleRockNews

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Every Rolling Stones Fan Should Own Live At The Tokyo Dome

Courtesy:  Eagle Rock Entertainment/Universal Music Group

Courtesy: Eagle Rock Entertainment/Universal Music Group

The Rolling Stones is the greatest rock band in the world. Period. That might be something of a subjective statement from this critic. But it is this critic’s own view. The band has spent the better part of half a century and then some proving its greatness. It has done so through the release of nearly thirty albums, at least thirteen live albums, and countless live performances throughout its life. One of those live recordings–Live at The Tokyo Dome–was released late last month as part of the band’s “From The Vault” series of recordings. This recording is one of the most important in the band’s extensive catalogue of live recordings. The main reason for this is the span of time that had passed between this show and the band’s most recent tour at the time, which had ended in Leeds in 1982. That is a span of seven years. While the band’s show at the Tokyo Dome wasn’t the lead off for the band’s Steel Wheels Tour, it still remains an important piece of the band’s history considering that span of time. Staying in that pattern of thought, the band’s stage presence throughout the course of the roughly two-hour performance lies at the center of the recording. That will be discussed shortly. In the same vein, the show’s featured set list is just as important to the presented concert as the band’s performance. Audiences will be interested to learn that of the concert’s twenty-four song set, the majority of its songs were lifted from the band’s older, more familiar albums than the band’s then latest album Steel Wheels. That will be discussed later as it plays its own important role in the whole of this recording. Last but hardly least of note in Live at The Tokyo Dome’s overall presentation is the presentation’s collective production values. The concert’s audio mix is surprisingly impressive. The video portion is just as interesting. That is because it shows just how far video recording technology has come since the concert’s recording. It is one more reason that this concert recording proves to be so important to the band’s history. Together with the band’s performance and its featured set list, the concert in whole shows in the end to be yet another great addition to The Rolling Stones’ “From The Vault” series.

The latest addition to The Rolling Stones’ “From The Vault” series, Live at The Tokyo Dome is one of the most important pieces of the band’s history to be released in recent history. That is because the concert presented here is part of a tour (The “Steel Wheels Tour”) that was the first for the band in seven years at the time. Before the band embarked on the “Steel Wheels Tour” in August 1989, its members had not been out on the road together since having performed in Leeds in 1982. That concert will be released by Eagle Rock Entertainment later this month. Now having noted this, the band’s stage presence in its Valentines Day 1990 concert is the concert’s most important element to note. Core members Mick Jagger and Keith Richards performed like they had never been away from the road. Mick strutted and danced all over the stage from start to finish, giving his all. Just as interesting (if not more so) to note of Jagger’s performance is his interaction with the audience. He spent a fair share of time talking to the audience and even going out into the audience at one point in the show. That’s just one part of what makes his interaction with the audience so intriguing. Most intriguing is that he seemed to speak to the audience in Japanese in more than just a couple of sentences. He really came across as being fluent in the language considering just how much he spoke in the audience’s home language. This is key to note because of just how many performers are trained in just a couple of phrases here in there for their respective foreign audiences even today. Jagger didn’t go that route. He really came across as being quite familiar with the language. It’s refreshing to hear. Moving on, lead guitarist Keith Richards was just as entertaining both as the band’s lead guitarist and in his time on the mic. That’s right. Richards even got his own time on the mic as he had written a pair of songs–‘Can’t Be Seen’ and ‘Happy’–for Steel Wheels. By comparison, bassist Bill Wyman showed nearly no emotion at all throughout the evening’s performance. Of course after the tour wrapped up later that year in Europe, Wyman and the band parted ways. Considering the well publicized issues among the band during its time away from the road prior to the “Steel Wheels Tour,” one becomes less surprised by Wyman’s apparent lack of interest and energy throughout the show. By comparison drummer Charlie Watts looked right at home behind the drum kit from beginning to end. He played his part like it was old hat yet still presented an air of truly enjoying being on stage again. One could also go into the performance provided by the band’s backup singers and musicians. But it goes without saying that their energy was just as positive, leading in turn to a show that audiences watching the show at home today will enjoy just as much as those audiences that were in attendance at the original performance. That is because the band in whole (including the backup performers) performed here as if it had never been away from the road. It’s just one part of the concert’s presentation that makes the recording so enjoyable. The show’s set list is just as important to the recording as the band’s performance.

The Rolling Stones’ stage presence (and that of the band’s backing performers) is central to the overall presentation of Live at The Tokyo Dome. It showed a group of performers that had obviously not lost a step in all of its years off the road and despite its own internal issues. While the musicians’ stage presence is important to the recording’s presentation in its own right, it is only one part of the presentation that should be noted. The show’s featured set list is just as important to the whole of the concert as the band’s stage presence. This is especially the case considering that while the band was touring in support of its then new album Steel Wheels, only five of the show’s twenty-four songs were pulled from that album. The other nineteen songs were older, more familiar tunes. It reaches all the way back to the band’s 1967 album Their Satanic Majesties Request. That album is represented through the song ‘2000 Light Years From Home.’ Beggar’s Banquet, Let It Bleed, Sticky Fingers (which was just recently re-issued), Exile on Main Street, It’s Only Rock ‘N Roll, Tattoo You, and Dirty Work are all represented in the show’s set list. The U.S. release of Between The Buttons is represented, too thanks to the inclusion of ‘Ruby Tuesday.’ Simply put the band included songs from a pretty wide swath of its catalogue up to that point in this show’s set list. This is important to note be cause it shows the band had taken into direct consideration the fact that so much time had passed since it had last toured. So those older songs were likely what audiences really wanted to hear since it’s what those audiences knew. It shows a deep respect for the audience. Considering this, it had to have made audiences respect the band even more in turn. That mutual respect between the band and audience ultimately makes the concert’s set list that much more important of an element in the whole of Live at The Tokyo Dome. And together with the band’s stage presence throughout each song, the two elements together show even more why Live at The Tokyo Dome such an important piece of The Rolling Stones’ history.

The Rolling Stones’ stage presence in Live at The Tokyo Dome and the concert’s set list are both of equal importance to the concert’s overall presentation. While both elements are important in their own right to the whole of this recording, they would be of no consequence without mention of the recording’s collective production values, or its audio and video. Audiences must go into this recording understanding that the concert was recorded in 1990. That was well before the advent of high-definition capabilities. That being the case, the audio mix at least proves to be relatively impressive. That is especially considering the size of the Tokyo Dome. Audiences will note in watching the performance just how open the concert hall is inside. It has very high ceilings and is just as open from wall to wall. That means an increased ability of the sound to echo throughout the hall. Luckily, all involved both at the concert and in preparing this recording handled their duties with the utmost precision. The result is a concert that sounds just as good on Blu-ray (and CD) as it did in the original performance if not better. The video quality is just as interesting. While some of the shots are clear others are at the opposite end of that spectrum. More specifically, there are some shots that are not quite in focus despite the best efforts of those behind the cameras. But they are luckily not enough to really ruin the concert’s overall viewing experience. If anything the combination of those shots and the concert’s re-mastered audio serves to show just how far recording technology has come since this concert was recorded. In its own way it actually makes the overall experience of this concert that much more enjoyable. Because it does, it makes the band’s performance that much more engaging and the show’s set list just as impressive. All things considered, Live at The Tokyo Dome shows in the end to be another welcome addition to The Rolling Stones’ ongoing “From The Vault” series.

The Rolling Stones’ Live at The Tokyo Dome is yet another welcome addition to the band’s ongoing “From The Vault” series. The band’s stage presence exhibits a band in general that had not lost a step despite having been off the road for roughly seven years before it embarked on its “Steel Wheels Tour.” The set list shows a certain amount of respect for fans considering that most of the show’s twenty-four-song set list was pulled from the band’s already extensive catalogue of albums at the time. And the recording’s overall production values show just how far recording technology has come since the concert’s original presentation even as impressive as those values are in their own right. One would be remiss to ignore the recording’s companion booklet and double gatefold packaging. The companion booklet adds even more enjoyment to the overall experience as it presents extra tidbits such as the revelation that the band’s stage setup was so big that it took eighty (yes, eighty) trucks to haul it from venue to venue. The crew required to assemble and break down the set was just as expansive, according to Richard Havers’ notes. It’s tough to figure out conversion rates, but the revelation of tickets to the Tokyo Dome show costing 10,000 Yen is just as eye-opening. These are just a couple of interesting extras that are noted in the companion booklet. And while it might be more bulky than the standard multi-disc setup, the double gatefold packaging of the SD Blu-ray/2-CD combo pack actually protects the discs more than that standard slim packaging. Whether for that packaging, the bonuses added by the companion booklet or for any of the centrally noted elements, it can be said of Live at The Tokyo Dome that the recording in whole is, again, one of the most important pieces of the band’s history and one that any Rolling Stones fan will want to have in his or her own music (and Rolling Stones) library. It is available now in stores and online. More information on this and other titles from Eagle Rock Entertainment is available online now at:

Website: http://www.eagle-rock.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/EagleRockEnt

Twitter: http://twitter.com/EagleRockNews

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Sweet Summer Sun Is A Sweet Treat For Any Rolling Stones Fan

Courtesy:  Eagle Rock Entertainment/Eagle Vision

Courtesy: Eagle Rock Entertainment/Eagle Vision

Eagle Rock Entertainment has done it yet again.  Somehow some way, Eagle Rock Entertainment has raised the bar yet again for live recordings.  Eagle Rock has raised the bar yet again with its new live Rolling Stones recording, Sweet Summer Sun: Hyde Park Live.  This concert recording is one for the ages.  And it’s one for viewers of all ages.  As viewers will see, the audience in attendance numbered more than one hundred thousand, according to the notes in the recording’s bonus booklet.  That hundred thousand plus number was comprised of fans from every background and every age.  This is a big statement, and it’s just one part of what makes this recording an absolute must have for any Rolling Stones fan.  The show’s cinematography has been a point of contention among viewers.  The reality of the cinematography is that there is nothing wrong with this aspect at all.  As a matter of fact, it is another part of the whole that makes this presentation such a joy to watch.  The bonus booklet included with the recording is the final touch to the package.  It is an excellent companion to the video presentation, as audiences will see in watching what is a concert film in every sense.  It provides an in-depth backstory on the band’s history at Hyde Park, as well as highlights of the show contained in the current recording.  Together with the cinematography and the concert itself, it makes for one of the best live concert recordings overall in a very long time.

The Rolling Stones’ Hyde Park performance from its “50 and Counting” tour is one for the ages and one for all ages.  Viewers that purchase this recording will see that among the one hundred thousand plus in attendance were concert goers of all ages.  There were people in their forties, fifties, and potentially older.  There were people in their twenties and thirties, too.  At one point, viewers will even see a young man that could not have been more than perhaps thirteen years old.  How many bands today can command an audience of over one hundred thousand?  How many can say that they command an audiences of such size and of such a wide age range at the same time?  This speaks loudly to just how popular and respected Mick Jagger and company are, even half a century after they first broke through and hit it big.  The songs and the performance of the band only make this hit even harder.  The audience in attendance was treated to rather wide array of songs from throughout the band’s career, starting fittingly with “Start Me Up.”  “Honky Tonk Women”, “Midnight Rambler”, and “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” are all there too along with plenty more songs to which even home audiences will find themselves ancing and singing.  The ironic thing of this show is that the band closes out the main concert feature with a performance of “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction.”  It’s pretty obvious that the band got plenty of satisfaction, as did the audience in attendance.  The same can be said of those that watch the concert both on DVD and Blu-ray.

The band’s performance and the vast size and age range of the audience at the Stones’ Hyde Park concert is in itself a big statement.  Making that statement even bolder is the concert’s cinematography.  There are those that have criticized this recording for its cinematography.  The biggest complaints are that the shots are too quick and that there aren’t enough close up shots of the band.  But those that complain obviously haven’t taken the full extent of the cinematography into account.  It’s that same cinematography that captures the full immensity of the audience in attendance.  The aerial angles used throughout the concert show the contrast of that massive crowd against the band on stage.  Those shots taken from behind the band are just as powerful.  They drive home the sheer size of the audience.  It makes even more incredible the fact that the band could command such an immense audience.  And then there are the “crowd shots.”  These shots are taken more from the angle of the crowd.  The shots taken from higher up show the massive size of the stage setup.  The wider the angle of those shots, the more it hits home to viewers just how large the stage set really was.

The cinematography and the overall immensity of the show truly make Sweet Summer Sun: Hyde Park Live a once in a lifetime concert in every sense of the term.  There’s still something else to consider that puts this latest live recording over the top.  That last aspect is the recording’s bonus booklet.  The booklet that comes with the recording gives viewers an in-depth look at the band’s history at Hyde Park.  It includes a full rundown of the concert contained on the new presentation’s disc.  That introduction helps to set up the recording in question.  There is also a handful of pictures peppered throughout the booklet that were taken during the newer of the band’s Hyde Park performances.  The history and the pictures make the booklet an invaluable addition to the overall presentation of this new release.  It is one more part of the whole that makes this release an absolute must have for any Rolling Stones fan.  The DVD, Blu-ray, and CD presentation of Sweet Summer Sun: Hyde Park Live are all available now in stores and online.  More information on this and other releases from Eagle Rock Entertainment is available online at http://www.eaglerockent.com and http://www.facebook.com/EagleRockEnt.  To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

New Vinyl Re-Issues Three More Reasons To Love The Stones

Courtesy:  ABKCO

Courtesy: ABKCO

The Rolling Stones have been celebrating a mark that very few bands and artists can claim.  The British blues rock based band has been celebrating half a century together this year.  As part of the ongoing celebration, a number of the band’s works have been reissued in recent months.  Among them have been the likes of Charlie is my Darling and a new greatest hits compilation (at least the third hits compilation from the band).  Earlier this summer, three more Stones works were re-issued in celebration of the band’s anniversary.  Those albums were Let It Bleed, Hot Rocks 1964 – 1971, and Beggar’s Banquet.  The albums in question weren’t re-issued on CD.  Rather, they were re-issued on vinyl, as a gift to all of the band’s long-time fans.  Sure, it’s nice to have the technology that is available today for music.  But it’s just as wonderful to have these classic releases re-issued on vinyl.

All three re-issues are such a joy first and foremost because of the sound quality on each set’s transfer.  Many people listen to vinyls because of the static on the records.  While the audio has been cleaned up on these re-issues, there’s still a certain feeling of hearing the original masters on a vinyl yet crystal clear.  It appeases both younger audiences and those with more knowledge of the band’s catalogue.  Hot Rocks 1964 – 1971 is presented in a double gatefold packaging.  Instead of the old school dark vinyl, this set’s discs are presented in clear 180 gram vinyl, just as with the other two vinyl re-issues of Beggar’s Banquet and Let It Bleed.  Both discs are safely packed inside their own sleeve so as to protect them just as with old any old school vinyl.  Inside the double-gatefold packaging, fans will find a collage of classic Rolling Stones photos complete with liner notes. This adds even more to the feeling of nostalgia that will be felt from simply holding the clear vinyl discs.

Courtesy:  ABKCO

Courtesy: ABKCO

The second of the new vinyl re-issues from ABKCO and the Rolling Stones, Let It Bleed is one of the greatest of the greatest albums released from Mick and the gang.  This vinyl is presented just as the original album was presented.  It comes complete with hits such as ‘Gimme Shelter’, ‘Midnight Rambler’ and what is one of the band’s biggest hits of all time, ‘You Can’t Always Get What You Want’ among many other hits.  This album was re-issued on 180-gram clear vinyl just as with Hot Rocks 1964 – 1971.  It should be noted here that the third in the set, Beggar’s Banquet was also released on 180-gram clear vinyl.  It was all part of ABKCO’s clear vinyl project.  These releases are just part of the larger program by ABKCO to release a number of artists’ classic albums on clear vinyl.  It is a wise marketing move in that it is much more appealing to the eye than old school vinyls.  And again, with the advances in technology, the audio is crystal clear.  That combined with the original artwork gives fans the best of both worlds yet again. 

Much the same already noted of Hot Rocks 1964 – 1971 and Let it Bleed can be noted of Beggar’s Banquet, too.  It would be redundant to bring about the same notes one more time that have already been stated.  What can be said in closing about not just Beggar’s Banquet, but of all three re-issues in this set is that this trio of albums from ABKCO and The Rolling Stones make a wonderful gift to fans from what is one of the greatest bands in the history of rock music.  As impressive as all three vinyl re-issues turn out to be, one can only wonder if ABKCO and the Rolling Stones will re-issue any other of the band’s classic LPs as it winds down its fiftieth anniversary, or beyond.  While fans wait for an answer to that question, audiences have quite a way to pass the wait with these records.  And audiences with more knowledge of the Stones’ history have quite the start on a trip down memory lane.  All three vinyl re-issues are available in stores and online now.  All three records can be ordered online direct from the ABKCO store at http://www.abkco.com/index.php/store/.

Courtesy:  ABKCO

Courtesy: ABKCO

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.