History, Military History Buffs Alike Will Appreciate ‘SOTD: Hannibal In The Alps’

Courtesy: PBS

The journey of Carthaginian General Hannibal Barca along the French Alps en route to his conquest of Rome, which included 30,000 troops, 15,000 horses and 37 war elephants, is one of the most talked about stories in history.  While the perilous journey has been well documented and talked about over the course of thousands of years, one thing has not been known about that fateful journey is how exactly he and his forces made it across the Alps.  That is until now.  PBS delves into that story in a new episode of its hit history-based series Secrets of the Dead.  Originally aired this past April, the roughly 50-minute program follows a group of researchers as the group works to tell once and for all how Hannibal and his forces managed to cross the Alps in just 16 days en route to the noted attack.  The story of the team’s research, which lies at the center of this episode of SOTD, is its cornerstone, and gives viewers more than enough reason to watch.  While the story of the team’s research on Hannibal’s journey goes a long way toward making this doc well worth the watch, it is missing at least one key element – the answer as to why Hannibal took his chosen path.  It is a minor detail, but still would have added even more depth to the story.  It will be discussed later.  The program’s overall pacing rounds out the program’s most important elements.  It will also be discussed later. Each noted element is important in its own right to the whole of Secrets of the Dead: Hannibal in the Alps.  That will be proven through a discussion on each topic.  All things considered, the noted elements make this episode of SOTD one that will interest military history aficionados and history buffs in general.

Secrets of the Dead: Hannibal in the Alps is a fully engaging new episode of PBS’ hit history-based series.  It is a presentation that is certain to appeal just as much to military history aficionados as it is to students and lovers of history in general.  That is proven in part through the story at the center of this program.  The program’s central story focuses on researchers’ efforts to determine which route Hannibal Barca took with his troops over the French Alps in order to attack Rome.  Over the course of the program’s roughly 50 minute run time, viewers learn that the records of Hannibal’s perilous journey were indeed true.  They also learn the route in question.  What’s more, viewers learn that General Barca and his forces had not one, but at least four different routes from which to choose to get through the intimidating mountain range.  That is a little tidbit that is rarely if ever taught about Hannibal’s journey in schools.  It adds its own depth to the story, and in turn makes the story that much more interesting.  There is also ground research that proves in the long-term that route as well as an interesting revelation about why the war elephants were chosen in the first place.  Hint: It had to do with their feet and their ability to adapt to the weather.  That’s all that will be given away there.  There is even note of the losses incurred over the journey because of its danger.  That note is shared as one member of the research team follows the exact path taken by Hannibal thousands of years ago.  Yes, one of the team actually traces Hannibal’s path.  That is a key addition to the story, too.  Between that addition and everything else shared throughout the story, viewers get here, a presentation that is certain to keep military history buffs and history buffs in general completely engaged from start to end.  That being the case, it forms a solid foundation for the program.  Of course for all that the story presented here does for the program, it is lacking in one key area – the question of WHY Hannibal chose the path that he chose.

The question of why Hannibal chose the path that he chose is answered to a point at the presentation’s finale.  However, the answer isn’t necessarily an answer as it is more or less one of the team speculating than actually stating known fact.  In defense of those behind this program, maybe not enough information has ever been available as to why Hannibal chose the most difficult route possible.  Though, if said information is or has been available, then one is left scratching one’s head as to why this topic was not covered as part of the overall discussion on Hannibal’s journey.  That’s especially important to note because the program does note that the other paths that Hannibal could have taken were much easier than the one that he opted to take.  Regardless of whether or not the information was available to the researchers, the fact that the program largely ignores this key question detracts from the program’s viewing experience – not enough that it makes the program unwatchable, but it certainly would have been nice to at least have someone say that the noted question was researched, but no information was recorded in reference.  With any luck, maybe another episode of SOTD will focus more directly on that question so as to put the finishing touch to the story that was so sadly lacking here.  Moving past this, the doc’s sole con, the program’s pacing rounds out the program’s most important elements, and it does so to its own positive end.

Given, Hannibal’s journey through and over the Alps took only 16 days.  Maybe that is why he took the most difficult route.  Maybe it was the shortest route, albeit the most difficult.  Getting back on track, this program goes into quite a bit of depth as it shows the efforts to determine which route Hannibal took through the Alps.  There is even the noted tracing of Hannibal’s route.  Keeping that in mind, there is a lot of ground covered here both literally and figuratively speaking.  Even as much ground is covered here, at no point does the program ever get ahead of viewers or leave them lost.  Rather, just enough time is spent on each portion of the research with just the right emphasis on each element to keep the doc moving forward solidly.  Coming full circle, that solid pacing ensures each portion of the program gets its own share of attention.  The end result is pacing that does just as much good for the presentation’s whole as the story itself.  In reality, both elements work hand in hand.  When they are coupled, they make Secrets of the Dead: Hannibal in the Alps a presentation that, again, will appeal easily to history and military history buffs alike.

Secrets of the Dead: Hannibal in the Alps is a strong new episode of PBS’ hit history-based series.  It is a presentation that is certain to reach plenty of audiences especially now that it is available on DVD.  That is proven in part through the story of the research team’s efforts to figure out how Hannibal and his forces made their way through the French Alps en route to their attack on Rome.  The pacing of the story ensures even more, viewers’ engagement.  When those two elements are joined, they do plenty to make up for the lack of one key element – the answer to the key question of why Hannibal decided on his specific route.  Each element is important in its own right to the whole of Secrets of the Dead: Hannibal in the Alps.  All things considered, it serves as another reminder of why Secrets of the Dead is one of PBS’ best series and why history and military history buffs alike will appreciate the program.  Secrets of the Dead: Hannibal in the Alps is available now.  More information on this and other episodes of Secrets of the Dead is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/secrets

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SecretsofTheDead

Twitter: http://twitter.com/SecretsPBS

 

 

 

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‘SOTD: Scanning The Pyramids’ Is A Rare Miss For PBS

Courtesy: PBS/Public Media Distribution

The Great Pyramid of King Khufu is one of the most well-known and talked about landmarks around the world.  Known as one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, the Great Pyramid has hidden so many secrets for centuries. So many methods have been used to try to decode the pyramid’s secrets, but so many mysteries still remain.  This past April, PBS presented a new program about the most recent efforts to uncover and answer some of those mysteries in a new episode of its hit history-based series Secrets of the Dead titled Scanning The Pyramids.  The story of those efforts is interesting, though honestly, does pose at least one problem.  It will be discussed shortly.  The visualizations and footage used to help tell the story do help at least to a point.  They will be discussed later.  The program’s pacing rounds out its most important elements.  That’s especially considering the other elements noted here.  Each element is important in its own right to this program.  All things considered, the noted elements make Secrets of the Dead: Scanning the Pyramids worth at least one watch.

Secrets of the Dead: Scanning The Pyramids is an interesting new addition to the rich history of PBS’ hit history-based series.  While not the series’ best offering, it is worth at least one watch.  That is due in part to the episode’s story.  The story starts out focusing on the efforts of a group of researchers to uncover and solve the mysteries of king Khufu’s Great Pyramid, but soon thereafter turns to the methods used to uncover one mystery in question – a single opening on the pyramid that had previously gone unnoticed.  Along the way, there’s a bunch of discussion on particle science and how it was used to determine that apparently there was something behind the entrance.  The thing is that there was no real answer as to what was behind the entrance.  To that end, this episode proves in the long run to just be another focus on the latest efforts to solve another mystery that remains unsolved.  What’s more, all the talk of particle physics and how they play into the efforts to figure out what may or may not be behind that entrance might go over most viewers’ heads and instead keep the attention of a very limited audience.  Along with all of this in mind, considering that the story focuses on the efforts to solve one mystery of one pyramid, the program’s title is not exactly fitting, either.  Rather, it is somewhat misleading.  Pyramids probably should have been reduced to the singular Pyramid instead of the plural in hindsight.  Keeping all of this in mind, the story at the center of Secrets of the Dead: Scanning the Pyramids proves to be worth at least one watch, but sadly proves in the end to be its own mystery even being worth one watch.  While the program’s story is somewhat problematic to its presentation, its footage and visualizations do help – to a point – to keep viewers engaged.

The footage and visualizations help keep viewers engaged as much as they do because they tend to help illustrate the importance of the methods.  For instance, watching the research of what the particle hits can do to help reveal what might be inside the pyramid shows how far research methods have come and what those methods can reveal.  On the same note, seeing the research team actually hard at work inside and outside the pyramid, working to get everything in place shows how important the project is to all involved.  There is even 3D technology of sorts used in the process.  That visualization alone is sure to leave viewers in awe while the internal and side scans of what is believed to be inside the pyramid will interest even the most novice of  Egyptian history buffs.  Keeping this in mind, the footage and visualizations do their own important part here to keep audiences watching.  They, collectively, are not the only important element that keeps viewers engaged.  The program’s pacing puts the final touch on the program.

Considering that this episode of Secrets of the Dead runs roughly 55 minutes and the amount of information shared over that course of time, the program’s pacing proves solid from start to end.  It would have been so easy for the program to get bogged down in its discussion on solar particles hitting Earth and their impact on the team’s research, but thankfully that didn’t happen here.  It would have also been easy to get bogged down in the pyramid’s many mysteries, but even that element was balanced with the program’s other elements, leading to just as much insurance of viewers’ engagement.  All things considered, each segment and every bit of information compliments the prior quite well.  The result is a program that moves fluidly from one element to another, thus keeping viewers at least partially watching, and more so if they are they program’s key audience.  When this is considered alongside the importance of this program’s visualizations and footage, the two elements do just enough to make this program worth at least one watch since the program’s story proves so problematic.  Keeping all of this in mind, Secrets of the Dead: Scanning The Pyramids proves in the end to be a program that, while not the series’ best entry, still worth at least one watch.

Secrets of the Dead: Scanning the Pyramids is an interesting addition to the rich history of PBS’ hit history-based series.  Its story shows that it is definitely aimed at a very specific target audience.  That’s rare for this series, too.  Thankfully, the program’s footage and visualizations couple with its pacing to do just enough to keep viewers engaged at least to a point that they make up for the story’s problems.  Keeping all of this in mind, while this program ultimately proves to not be the best entry from Secrets of the Dead, it is still worth at least one watch.  It is available now and can be ordered online direct via PBS’ online store.  More information on this and other episodes of Secrets of the Dead is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/secrets

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SecretsofTheDead

Twitter: http://twitter.com/SecretsPBS

 

 

 

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PBS Follows Hannibal’s Journey Across The Alps In New Episode of ‘Secrets Of The Dead’

Courtesy: PBS

Hannibal’s journey along the Alps along with his forces is one of the most talked about stories from history.  Throughout the ages, no one has been able to definitively say which path the infamous General took en route to Rome.That is until now.

PBS delves into that story in a new episode of its hit history-based series Secrets of the Dead.  Originally aired this past April, it is currently scheduled to be released on DVD June 5.  The roughly 50-minute program follows a group of researchers as the group works to tell once and for all how Hannibal — with his 30,000 troops, 15,000 horses and 37 war elephants — managed to cross the Alps in just 16 days en route to his attack on Rome.

Secrets of the DeadHannibal in the Alps will retail for MSRP of $24.99, but can be pre-ordered now at a reduced price of $19.99 via PBS’ online store.  A trailer for this episode of Secrets of the Dead is streaming online now here. More information on this and other episodes of Secrets of the Dead is available online now at:

 

Website: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/secrets

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SecretsofTheDead

Twitter: http://twitter.com/SecretsPBS

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

PBS Taking Audiences Back To The Pyramids In A New Episode Of ‘Secrets Of The Dead’

Courtesy: PBS/Public Media Distribution

PBS and Public Media Distribution are bringing home another episode of PBS’ hit history-based series Secrets of the Dead.

Secrets of the DeadScanning the Pyramids will be released April 3.  It will be released exclusively on DVD.  This new episode of SOTD follows the first scientific expedition of the pyramids authorized by the Egyptian government in the last 30 years.  The expedition is conducted by the investigative team known as Scan Pyramids, which consists of members from around the world — particle physicists, thermal imaging experts, and 3D tech experts.

The organization uses its talents and tools in this episode to explore and map the pyramids over the course of two years.  Those searches resulted in some new discoveries including some previously undetected chambers in the Great Pyramid of Khufu — chambers previously undetected since the Middle Ages.  Audiences can view a trailer for the episode now here.

Secrets of the DeadScanning The Pyramids will retail for MSRP of $24.99, but can be pre-ordered now at a reduced price of $19.99 via PBS’ online store.  More information on this and other episodes of Secrets of the Dead is available online now at:

 

Website: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/secrets

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SecretsoftheDead

Twitter: http://twitter.com/SecretsPBS

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

‘SOTD: Nero’s Sunken City’ Is A Splash Hit

Courtesy: Public Media Distribution/PBS

Early last month, Public Media Distribution released a new episode of its hit history-based series Secrets of the Dead that examines what is one of the world’s great lost cities in Secrets of the Dead: Nero’s Sunken City.  Now, it isn’t Atlantis.  This city is one that actually did exist.  It is the lost city of Baiae, a city that has been considered by many to be the Las Vegas of the ancient world. What happened in Baiae stayed in Baiae, as is noted in the program.  This nearly hour-long is a program that will appeal to students and lovers of archaeology and anthropology.  That is due in no small part to the story at the program’s heart.  The re-enactments used to help tell the story are just as important to note as the story itself in examining this program’s overall presentation.  The program’s pacing round out its most important elements.  Each element is important in its own right to the program’s presentation, as will be pointed out.  All things considered, they make Secrets of the Dead: Nero’s Sunken City a program that history buffs in general will appreciate just as much as those who have an interest in archaeology and anthropology.

Secrets of the Dead: Nero’s Sunken City is a program that will appeal to history buffs in general as well as students and lovers of archaeology and anthropology.  That is due in part to the story at the program’s heart.  The story follows researchers as they examine the infamous city’s history and how roughly half of the city ended up beneath the waves. The city’s history includes the story of one of the world’s most nefarious rulers, Nero.  As the story reveals, it was at Baiae that Nero allegedly killed not only his aunt but his own mother, too just so that he could take their villas, which were located in Baiae.  It was also in Baiae that other Roman politicians came to take part in rather decadent and sometimes taboo activities.  Many of the political schemes that rocked Rome were also planned at Baiae.  The story of those activities, plans and of Nero’s own heinous actions is collectively eye-opening to say the very least.  The story of how the city nearly vanished thanks to volcanic activity (and how that same activity is in fact slowly bringing the city closer to the water’s surface) is in itself interesting.  As if all of that is not enough, viewers also learn of the seafood dishes that were once created at Baiae through the story.  Those same dishes are still made by residents of the region today. Keeping all of this in mind, it becomes clear why the story at the center of SOTD: Nero’s Sunken City is so pivotal to the program’s overall presentation.  When people think of sunken cities, minds automatically go to Atlantis, not Baiae.  That being the case, this story takes viewers to a real sunken city; one whose story is just as interesting as that of the fabled Atlantis if not more so.  The story at the center of this episode of SOTD is only one of the elements that makes the program stand out.  The re-enactments that are used to help tell the story are important in their own, collective, way to the program’s presentation.

The story at the center of SOTD: Nero’s Sunken City is in itself plenty of reason for audiences to watch this program.  The story will appeal not only to history buffs in general but to students and lovers of archaeology, anthropology and even geology.  It is the story of a sunken city that is nowhere near as talked about as that of the fabled city of Atlantis, which may or may not even exist.  Baiae does exist.  That makes this story even more interesting.  The story here is only one part of what makes this program so interesting.  The re-enactments that are used to help tell Baiae’s story are collectively just as important to discuss as the program’s central story.  The re-enactments are so important to note because of their minimal usage.  Audiences do get to see a man portraying Nero as the discussions turn to him.  But the extent of what audiences get is basically that of the actor walking around.  Even as the story turns to the discussions of Nero’s heinous alleged acts of murder, audiences will be glad to know that there is no unnecessary gory re-enactment.  Those behind the program’s production are to be commended for the common sense of not going there.  Other networks clearly would have no problem going that route.  So it is good to see that those behind this engaging PBS program opted to take the high road.  Between that and the balance of the re-enactments to the live action footage, audiences get in the program’s visual experience an element that sits atop the foundation formed by the program’s story, strengthening it even more.  While the re-enactments (or the general lack thereof) serve to enhance the program’s presentation even more, they are not the last of its most important elements.  The program’s pacing rounds out its most important elements.

The story at the center of SOTD: Nero’s Sunken City and the minimally used re-enactments used to help tell that story are both key to the program’s overall presentation.  While each element is important in its own right to the program’ presentation–as has been pointed out–the two are not the program’s only key elements.  The program’s pacing rounds out its most important elements.  From start to finish, the program’s pacing never moves too fast or slow.  Each segment gets its own share of time, and the information shared in each segment never gets so in-depth that everyday audiences will feel lost.  That being the case, audiences will find themselves feeling like the program progresses with ease, not even being moved to check their watches (or cell phones) for the time.  That is a testament to the manner in which the program was assembled.  It makes the program’s pacing feel wholly natural, in turn ensuring even more audiences’ maintained engagement.  When this is taken into consideration with the program’s story and the re-enactments used to tell the story (alongside the live action footage), the whole of these three elements makes SOTD: Nero’s Sunken City another enjoyable edition of Secrets of the Dead.

Secrets of the Dead: Nero’s Sunken City is yet another example of what makes Secrets of the Dead one of the best history-based series on television today.  It also is more proof of the importance of public broadcasting to the world.  It offers an original story that will educate and surprise audiences at the same time. The balance of the program’s re-enactments and live action material adds even more interest to the program.  The program’s pacing puts the final touch to the program.  Each element is important in its own right to the program’s whole.  All things considered, they make this episode of Secrets of the Dead more proof of why it is not *ahem* secret why Secrets of the Dead is one of the best history-based programs on television today.  It is available now and can be ordered online direct via PBS’ online store.  More information on this and other episodes of Secrets of the Dead is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/secrets

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SecretsofTheDead

Twitter: http://twitter.com/SecretsPBS

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

PBS’ New Da Vinci Doc Paints An Interesting New Picture Of Leonardo

Courtesy: Public Media Distribution/PBS

Leonard Da Vinci is considered around the world to be one of the most important figures in the realms of art and science.  His paintings are revered as masterpieces.  His inventions are said to be creations of a genius mind.  However his inventions may in fact not be entirely his as is argued in a new episode of PBS’ hit history-based series Secrets of the DeadSecrets of the Dead: Leonardo The Man Who Saved Science, released on DVD early this month, examines the reality of Da Vinci’s contributions to the scientific community.  That reality is the most important part of the program’s presentation.  It will be discussed shortly.  The re-enactments used to help tell Da Vinci’s story are important in their own right to the program’s whole.  They will be discussed later.  The program’s pacing rounds out its most important elements.  Each item is important in its own right to the program’s whole.  All things considered, they make Leonardo – The Man Who Saved Science a secret worth sharing with lovers and students of science of all ages.

Secretes of the Dead: LeonardoThe Man Who Saved Science is a secret that should be shared with lovers and students of science of all ages.  Released earlier this month on DVD, it paints a picture of Da Vinci (yes, that awful pun was fully intended) that is rarely shown.  It uses new information found in Da Vinci’s own journals to reveal that inventions previously thought to be Da Vinci’s own creations likely were not entirely his.  Rather the program reveals Da Vinci likely took designs from other sources and enhanced them with his own specs.  Those designs included designs for the parachute, the tank and even catapult among so many other inventions.  This is such an intriguing revelation because Da Vinci has been considered a scientific genius responsible for so many of the world’s advances for centuries.  This revelation shows that while he obviously was a smart man, he might not have in fact been the full-on genius that he was previously thought to be.  That is not meant to mean he was not smart.  He clearly was very intelligent.  But the level of his contributions to the scientific community definitely needs to be re-evaluated as is evidenced in this program.  Interestingly enough, the changes that he seemingly made to the pre-existing designs is something that is done in companies worldwide to this day.  To that end, one could argue that Da Vinci’s approach is the model for so many major companies’ employees today.  To that end, one could argue that Da Vinci was a ground breaker in that avenue.  Keeping in mind all of this, the story at the center of this program and its related information ultimately proves to be the program’s most critical element.  It is just one of the program’s key elements.  The re-enactments used to tell the story are collectively just as important to its presentation as the story itself.

The story at the center of SOTD: Leonard The Man Who Saved Science is the cornerstone of the program’s overall presentation.  It sheds new light on Da Vinci and his contributions to the scientific community.  While clearly important to the program’s presentation, it is only one of the program’s key elements.  The re-enactments used to help tell the story are just as important as the story to the program’s presentation.  That is because they provide a full visual aid for audiences.  It serves to entertain audiences, much like so many other episodes of PBS’ hit series, at the same time that they are being educated.  The re-enactments are once again on the same level as those presented in the documentaries that once made History Channel so respected.  Audiences will enjoy seeing Da Vinci try to convince his assistant take a giant leap of faith with his parachute design early on in the program.  They will enjoy just as much, seeing the wheels spinning in his head as he examined another man’s plans as a young man, thinking how he could improve on them and watching him work on the designs throughout his life.  Between these and other moments, the re-enactments that are used throughout the course of this program add to the depth generated through the story.  They truly do make the story just as entertaining as it is educational.  To that end, they help make the program a success just as much as the program’s central story.  It is not the last of the program’s most important elements, either.  The program’s pacing rounds out its most important elements.

The story at the heart of SOTD: Leonardo The Man Who Saved Science and the re-enactments used to help tell that story are both important parts of the program’s whole.  That has been made clear in the discussions already noted here.  They are not its only important elements, though.  The program’s pacing is just as important to its whole as those previously discussed elements.  The nearly hour-long program’s pacing is to be applauded as it remains stable from start to finish.  It would have been very easy for the program to get muddled at so many points in the discussion on Da Vinci’s contributions to the scientific community.  The same applies to the discussions on his personal life, as it does focus on that aspect of his life, too.  Instead of letting that happen, it never allows itself to get stuck on either aspect.  This is important to note because that expert balance keeps the program moving forward solidly from start to finish.  The result is a program that will keep audiences engaged and entertained the entire time.  That maintained engagement and entertainment ensures even more retention of the material presented throughout and in turn assures even more audiences’ appreciation for the program.  That appreciation will lead audiences to agree once more that the program in whole is its own enjoyable addition to this year’s crop of new documentaries.

Secrets of the Dead: Leonardo The Man Who Saved Science is an interesting and entertaining new look at the life and work of Leonardo Da Vinci.  It shows an important part of Da Vinci’s story that has rarely, if ever, been shown.  The re-enactments used to tell that important story deepen the story even more.  The solid pacing from start to finish puts the finishing touch to the program’s presentation.  Each element is important in its own right, as has been already been discussed.  All things considered, they make this episode of Secrets of the Dead its own enjoyable addition to this year’s crop of new documentaries.  It is available now and can be ordered direct online via PBS’ online store.  More information on this and other episodes of SOTD is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/secrets

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SecretsofTheDead

Twitter: http://twitter.com/SecretsPBS

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

PBS “Dives” Into History In New Episode Of “SOTD”

Courtesy: PBS/Public Media Distribution

PBS is taking audiences below the waves in a new episode of its hit history-based series Secrets of the Dead.

Public Media Distribution will release Secrets of the Dead: Nero’s Sunken City on DVD Tuesday, May 9.  This new installment of SOTD follows a group of archaeologists as they investigate the ancient city of Baiea.

The investigation isn’t all easy, though, as more than half of the city sits submerged beneath the Bay of Naples. The submerged ruins are three times the size of those found at Pompeii.  The investigations found roads, brick walls, villas with marble floors and mosaics as well as elaborate spas and more.

The once great city was the personal playground of Rome’s elite class in its heyday.  Now centuries after it was overtaken by the sea, archaeologists set out to find out what led to the city’s disappearance, what once made it such a thriving location and what actually happened in the city.

Secrets of the Dead: Nero’s Sunken City will retail for MSRP of $24.99, but can be pre-ordered now at a reduced price of $19.99 via PBS’ online store.  Audiences can see a trailer for this episode of SOTD online now here.

More information on this and other episodes of Secrets of the Dead is available online now at:

 

 

Website: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/secrets

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SecretsofTheDead

Twitter: http://twitter.com/SecretsPBS

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.