Musical Arrangements, Production Save Orbit Culture’s New LP

Courtesy: Seek & Strike

Independent metal band Orbit Culture is working hard to make a name for itself within the bigger metal community.  The band released its new album Nija aug 7 through seek & Strike Records.  The 10-song album is a powerful entry that will appeal to the band’s target audience.  That is due in part to its musical arrangements, which will be addressed shortly.  Its lyrical themes do their own part to make the album appealing to the noted listeners.  The record’s production is just as much of note as its overall content.  When this item is considered along with the album’s content, the album in whole proves to be a presentation that the band’s target audience base will agree is worth hearing at least once.

Orbit Culture’s new album Nija is a strong new effort from the band that the group’s target audience base will appreciate.  That is due in no small part to the record’s collective musical arrangements.  From beginning to end of the 45-minute record, its riffs, seething vocal deliveries, bass and drums will appeal to a wide range of listeners.  Each arrangement exhibits touches of groove metal joined with death metal, thrash, and even a bit of black metal.  At the same time, there is also a hint of melodic metal and hard rock added to the mix for a result that is truly interesting.  The heavier arrangements will appeal to fans of bands, such as Whitechapel, Humanity’s Last Breath, and Gojira.  The album’s more melodic moments, such as in ‘Open Eye’ and ‘See Through Me’ take listeners in a completely different direction.  ‘Open Eye’ conjures thoughts of early Metallica at various points while the whole of ‘See Through Me’ is more of a metalcore presentation.  In the exact same breath, there are plenty of other moments in ‘Open Eye’ that are more akin to the noted heavier acts.  The two elements are very well-balanced here and make for quite the interesting composition.  ‘Sun of All’ is another of those arrangements in this record that balances the noted death and black metal elements with a distinct melodic hard rock sensibility.  It comes later in the record’s run.  The two sides are so well-balanced, too, that one can’t help but listen.  Add in the hypnotizing string arrangement and metalcore elements, and audiences get in this song what is musically, one of the album’s most standout moments.  It’s just one more way in which the album’s musical arrangements show their importance.  When it is considered along with the rest of the album’s arrangements (noted and not) the whole of the album’s musical body becomes a presentation that in itself makes the album well worth hearing.  For all that the album’s musical arrangements do for its whole, they are just one of the album’s notable aspects.  Its lyrical content is sure to generate its own share of interest among audiences.

The lyrical content featured throughout Nija is intriguing to say the least.  While the record’s musical arrangements guarantee far-reaching appeal, its lyrical content feels much more targeted with its dark, nihilistic overtones.  Case in point is the lyrical content featured in ‘North Star of Nija.’  The song’s lead verse states, “Combust/The opulence of all the human faults in flames/You’ve killed/But you see yourself for real in here/The serpent/Black god/The north star of Nija.”  The song’s second verse adds in, “Adjust the ornament/To fit the true king of our realm/You bow to a darker power that’s real in here…I’ve lived through some grey days/But I’ve never really given it a thought/How I live/How it’s feasting on me/How it’s taking me.”  The song’s third verse is just as heavy, stating, “I’m the leader of all that’s dead/I’m the crows that you witness next/I’m the leech that steals from the mother’s breast/I’m the serpent in Hell.”  The song goes on in similar fashion from here with the only real seeming glimmer of hope coming later in the line, “You’ll stay here for a long time/You’ll dry your tears from off your face/But you can’t look back now.”  Even that is questionable in its delivery.  It could be positive, but considering the next lines, it is difficult to say.  Ultimately the song ends with the line, “I’ve sent down the crows to Hell/To gather the bones of you/I’ve given the piece of skin/To the gods of the broken man/I am complete.”  So maybe, just maybe this is meant to send a sense of overcoming adversity.  It leaves even this critic bewildered.  Even with all of this in mind, that it has the potential to create so much discussion makes it stand out as just one example of what makes the album’s lyrical content important.  ‘Behold’ is another example of what makes Nija’s lyrical intriguing.

‘Behold’ comes across as a deeply introspective work in its own right.  Front man Niklas Karlsson sings in the song’s lead verse, “In the essence of the fire/I’m realizing that this is life now/I’ve tried so hard to keep this feeling/Of feeling sane/Mind and body/I tried so hard to keep the demons/The fallen society/The downfall of you and me/in the white halls we are searching.”  He continues in the song’s second verse, “In the presence of the higher/The mesmerizing colors/I’ve tried so hard to find the healing/Being sane/Tired body/I tried so hard to keep the demons in me.”  At this point, it can be inferred that this is someone facing that age old battle with self.  Things don’t get much brighter from here.  As a mater of fact, the nihilism continues right to the end, with Karlsson stating in the end, “Death is certain/Nothing else more can be/No light in the tunnels of this force spinning wheel/The white robe ideal.”  Simply put, this is not the happiest of songs musically or lyrically.  It will appeal to a very targeted listener base.  Keeping that in mind, it is just one more way in which the record’s lyrical content proves its importance to its whole.  ‘Rebirth’ is just as nihilistic as ‘Behold’ and much of the album’s other songs in its lyrical presentation.

Much like ‘Behold’ and the album’s other songs, this is a work that will appeal to a very targeted audience.  That is because it is just as lyrically heavy as those works.  The song’s lead verse proves that as Karlsson sings, “My sun/It’s time to leave this world/It’s time to leave the daylight stream/It’s time to feel this rain/Through the fire hail/This is all I have to say/This is all that’s left of me/In this shell I’ve lived through Hell/Walking icy plains/I cannot take what this world gave me/I cannot live through this hell/I cannot take this life that I’ve been given/I’ve always sung the words and songs of death.”  Once again, things don’t get much brighter from here.  To that end, there is not a lot of need to go on from here about this song’s lyrical content.  Again, it is a presentation that will only appeal to a very targeted audience.  In other words, it’s one more example of why the lyrics play their own role in the bigger picture of Nija.  Needless to say the album’s lyrics require audiences to be in a very specific mindset in order to be appreciated.  To that end, whether it detracts from or adds to the album’s presentation all depends on the listener.  Regardless of which side one takes in that discussion, one thing on which everyone can agree is that the album’s production rounds out its most important elements.

The production of Nijia is important to note because it is that work that made the album sound so good.  As noted already, there is a lot going on throughout this record in terms of its arrangements.  There are moments in which the guitars and vocals roar alongside the bass and drums.  There are also moments throughout the album that are more controlled (for lack of better wording).  There are also moments in which both are incorporated into one song.  Regardless of which song is chosen, it can be said that the utmost attention to detail was taken throughout the album.  Each instrument is expertly coupled with its partners from start to end.  The result is a record that is worth hearing just as much as it is for the depth of the arrangements themselves.  Those two elements together make the album worth hearing even despite the issues raised by the album’s lyrical content.

Orbit Culture’s new album Nija is an intriguing offering from the independent metal outfit.  That is due in part to the record’s musical arrangements, which blend together so many different metal genres from one to the next and even within themselves.  They make the album worth hearing if only for themselves.  The album’s lyrical content poses a bit of a problem for its presentation.  That is because in looking at this aspect, it will appeal to a very targeted audience, unlike the album’s musical content.  Even with that in mind, the lyrical content does not detract so much from the album that it is not worth hearing.  The record’s production partners with the arrangements to make up for the problem posed by the album’s lyrical content.  The production and music work together to make Nija worth hearing at least among the metal masses.  It is available now through Seek & Strike Records.  More information on Nija is available along with all of Orbit Culture’s latest news and more at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.orbitculture.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/OrbitCulture

 

 

Twitter: http://twitte.com/orbitculture

 

 

 

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Asinis’ Debut LP Gives Promise For The Band’s Future

Courtesy: Seek & Strike

Independent metalcore band Asinis releases its debut EP Roots today through Seek & Strike.  The band’s debut studio recording, this five-song record is quite a notable first offering from the band.  That is due in part to its lyrical content.  This will be discussed shortly.  Its musical content builds on the foundation formed through its lyrical content and will be discussed a little later.  The record’s production and mixing puts the finishing touch to its presentation.  Each noted item is important in its own right to the whole of the EP.  All things considered, they make Gaia one of this year’s most unique EPs and debuts from any hard rock and metal band.

Asinis’ debut EP Roots is one of this year’s more unique new offerings within the hard rock and metal community, especially being an EP.  That is due in large part to the record’s lyrical content.  That content in question makes up what the band calls the first chapter in the story of the planet Gaia.  The exact wording from a post on the band’s official Facebook page reads, “Roots is the first chapter in the continuing history of the planet Gaia. The listener gets first insights, since it is about the visualization of Gaia, her power, the longings of her creation and about fighting spirit.”  Concept records are typically saved for full-length records, not EPs.  EPs are usually “test records” of sorts for young groups just starting out and in other cases, space fillers for other acts.  So to use an EP and concept record – a concept record with a fantasy story no less – to start out is brave.  The band is to be commended for that.  The band is also to be commended for the way in which the story is told through each song, beginning with the EP’s opener, ‘Gaia.’  The song’s lyrics paint a rich, vivid picture of the planet, the lead verse stating of the environment, “The pulsating blue morning sun charges the atmosphere with its powerful light/Soft winds blow across the lands and seas/Carrying the source of growth/From her core she created the beings/In the image and likeness of herself The diversity – deep within the same/Swing in unity/All is connected In an invisible grid An intricate system Self-regulated.”  The picture becomes richer thanks to the second verse, which states, “The bubbling blood has formed the mountains That raise towards the stars above A shiny gleam emerges now and then It awakes pure force within Dance with the moons Orbit the flashing sun Dance with persistence Until every motion is gone We are dancing We are one We are – we are.”  This is a celebration of life and the force that created it on her planet.  As the story continues, listeners are presented with sub-stories of sorts about the beings who populate the planet.  They are much like us, dealing with many different personal feelings and thoughts, from that person looking for that other person in their life who completes  them in ‘Soulmate’ to the person gaining enlightenment in life in ‘Stardust’ to the person who is feeling pride of overcoming adversity in ‘Victor’ to the person realizing he/she has a greater purpose.  The stories featured within the songs’ lyrical content are stories to which we the listeners can relate.  That is because the concepts in the songs are universal.  The messages are largely positive and will uplift any listener.  What’s more, while they are pat of a bigger story, these songs, in their lyrical presentations stand just as well on their own merits as they do collectively.  Keeping that in mind, the lyrical content featured in Roots serves as a solid foundation for the EP.  It is just one part of what makes Roots so surprisingly appealing.  The lyrics’ musical accompaniments add to the record’s interest.

The musical arrangements that accompany Roots’ lyrical themes will appeal to fans of bands, such as Unearth, Killswitch Engage and As I Lay Dying.  That is evident through the presentation of the sharp, heavy guitars, the equally cutting vocal deliveries, the bass lines and the precision in the time keeping.  From one song to the next, elements of each noted band’s influence is evident along with influences of other well-known metalcore acts.  ‘Gaia,’ the EP’s opener, starts out gentle, but wastes little time launching into its full presentation.  This song likens itself more to works from Unearth and other metalcore acts than KsE or AILD.  ‘Soulmate’ meanwhile is more akin to those two bands with its machine gun drumming and guitars in its opening bars and its short guitar bursts and sharp vocal delivery throughout the rest of its body.  ‘Stardust’ takes the band back in a heavier direction again as the EP enters its midpoint.  ‘Victor,’ is very similar stylistically to works from AILD what with its more melodic yet heavy approach.  ‘Revolution,’ which closes out the EP, is grounded in its guitars and drums.  The dual guitar approach and the stability in the time keeping form a solid foundation on which the vocals and bass rest so easily.  From start to end, the arrangements featured in this record will keep metalcore fans everywhere engaged and entertained in their own right.  Together with the lyrical content, the two sides of the EP’s whole are sure to make this presentation one that will appeal to lots of metal audiences.  They are still only a portion of what makes the EP stand out.  Its overall mixing and production puts the finishing touch to its presentation.

The mixing and production that went into Roots is notable because of the balanced sound from each arrangement.  There is a whole lot happening in each song, from the powerhouse guitar lines to the equally searing vocals to the precision in the time keeping (complete with all of the fills) and the low-end from the bass.  It would have been so  easy for those behind the boards to let all of it mingle together and just become a wall of sound.  That has happened with plenty of other bands’ records.  Thankfully it did not happen in this case.  The result is a work whose production and mixing proves just as pivotal to its presentation as its overall content.  All things considered, it proves to be a good introduction from Asinis and a work that shows promise for the band within the metalcore community.

Asinis’ debut EP Roots is an applause-worthy debut from the German metalcore band.  That is due in part to its overall lyrical content.  The lyrical content makes up one chapter of what is apparently going to be an ongoing conceptual story from the band.  The story is original, but still is able to connect with listeners.  The musical arrangements that accompany said lyrical content adds its own element of appeal to the whole, as does the EP’s production and mixing.  Each item is important in its own way to the whole of Roots.  All things considered, they make Roots a work that shows promise for the band’s future in the metalcore community.  The EP is available now through Seek & Strike.  More information on Roots is available along with all of Asinis’ latest news and more at:

 

 

Website: http://asinis.de

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/asinisband

 

 

 

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Zero Theorem’s New EP Proves To Have Been Worth The Wait

Courtesy: Shim Sham LLC/Seek & Strike

Independent hard rock band Zero Theorem recently announced that it will serve as support for Fozzy on a trio of live dates this summer.  The performances, scheduled to take place July 10 in Columbus, OH; July 12 in Chicago, IL and Aug. 2 in Angola, IN, are part of Fozzy’s “Save The World Tour.”  Zero Theorem’s performances are in support of its new EP The Killing: Part I.  Originally scheduled for release in November through Seek & Strike Records, it was re-issued in January through Shim Sham LLC.  The five-song, 15-minute record is a presentation that will appeal to fans of more well-known acts, such as Disturbed and Breaking Benjamin with its musical arrangements.  Its lyrical content will appeal to an even wider range of listeners, as is evidenced in part through the EP’s opener ‘You.’  The song will be discussed shortly.  ‘Something Different,’ the EP’s penultimate track, does its own share to make the record appealing to the noted audiences.  It will be discussed a little later.  The EP’s title track is another notable addition to the record’s presentation.  When it is examined alongside the other two songs noted here and the EP’s remaining pair of songs, the presentation in whole becomes a work that shows some promise for this up-and-coming hard rock act.  Given the right attention, they collectively make The Killing: Part I a work that could make the band one of the next big names in the hard rock community.

Zero Theorem’s new EP The Killing: Part I is an interesting new work for the up-and-coming hard rock band.  It will appeal to a wide range of listeners with its combined musical and lyrical content, as is evidenced in part through its opener, ‘You.’  The song’s full-on industrial sound immediately lends itself to comparisons to works from the likes of Breaking Benjamin and Disturbed.  The song’s heavy bridge adds comparisons to the likes of Fear Factory.  That mix of musical influences does plenty to make this song stand out for any metal purist.  Its fiery energy does well to compliment the song’s equally hard-hitting lyrical content, which addresses people who would rather stick their heads in the sand than do something to affect change in the world.

The noted message is inferred as front man Caesar sings in the song’s lead verse, “Death falls out from the sky/And you don’t even notice/Hollow and sunken eyes/You never hear the locusts/Wars wage another day/But you forsake the reason/Right now no one is safe/While there’s still life to feast on/You turn your head to forget/Your days are running out/If it happened to you/it could happen to you/If you were abused/Would you feel the same way, too?”  He adds to his statement in the song’s second verse, singing, “Wash out another life/While you savor the taking/You’re almost out of time/You’re reckless and you’re breaking/Screams call out from all sides/But you don’t ever listen/You’d rather lose your sight/Than see all the attrition/You turn your head to forget/Your days are running out/If it happened to you/It could happen to you/If you were abused/Would you feel the same way, too?”  This indictment of those who would rather ignore the world’s problems and complain about them than face them head on is a strong statement.  It’s hardly the first time that a band or group has ever addressed the issue, but is still very much a welcome statement.  The addition of the song’s equally hard-hitting musical arrangement drives home the frustration in the song’s lyrics, making the song in whole stand out that much more.  Keeping all of this in mind, the song in whole is a prime example of what makes The Killing: Part I a notable new offering from Zero Theorem.  It is just one of the EP’s key tracks.  ‘Something Different,’ the fourth of the EP’s five tracks, is another important addition to its whole.

‘Something Different’ presents a musical arrangement that once again boasts the noted influences from Disturbed and Breaking Bejamin.  The important thing to note here is that even with those influences, the arrangement in whole still manages to maintain its own identity.  This song’s arrangement is more of a radio ready work, with its more straight-forward melodic hard rock approach.  The verses and the chorus provide just enough melody and heaviness to make this work readily accessible for any mainstream hard rock fan.  When that musical content is accompanied by the song’s thought provoking lyrical content, the whole makes the song stand out even more.

Caesar sings in the song’s lead verse, “You try to hide away from your thoughts/And all of the costs you cannot pay/You try to medicate through the hurt/And all that is worse/You suffocate/Don’t you see, the world slows down for no one/It slows down for no one/How can you believe this is who you are/When you know you’re something different/How can you still feel this is what you want/When inside you’re something different?”  He continues in the song’s second verse, “You try to turn away from your grief/And all you believe/You cannot say/You try to replicate the disease/And all of its memes/You simulate/Don’t you see the world slows down for no one/It slows down for no one.”  The message seemingly being presented here is yet again of someone trying to ignore reality, but in a different fashion this time.  In this case, the song comes across as a commentary about those who would rather live in a false reality than face their own personal problems.  That would explain the semi-sense of urgency in the song’s arrangement.  Caesar reiterates the statement of getting a person to realize who and what he/she is.  It is a work that is certain to resonate with plenty of listeners, and is just one more of the EP’s most notable entries.  The EP’s title track is one more key addition to the record.

‘The Killing’ is perhaps the most unique of the songs featured in The Killing: Part I.  That is due in large part to its musical arrangement.  This arrangement is very driven by its keyboard and guitar lines.  Drummer Jake Hayden adds his own punch to the song with his time keeping while bassist Eloy Palacios builds on that foundation to strengthen the song in whole even more.  The whole of the band’s work makes the song a work that has the already noted influences, but instead of sound just like works from the noted bands, presents a sound that is unique to this band.  One could even argue that the keyboards show a hint of influence from the likes of Amaranthe, in hindsight.  All things considered here, the song’s arrangement makes itself reason enough for audiences to take in this song.  The song’s lyrical content joins with the arrangement to make the song stand out even more.

Caesar sings in the song’s lead verse, “If in fact, we’re all just ordinary animals/Is our consciousness our own disease/Did we mean to create adversaries/Typical/The trap we set is our own belief/Bodies continue to fall/The killing’s taking over/There is no end to it all/Don’t sit back and wait ‘til the killing is over/There is no place to hide/

‘Til the killing is over/Commence with the killing.”  He continues in the song’s second verse, “If in fact we’re just the start of something historical/Maybe we need to get to the next scene/let our cells divide themselves/While we go for a ride/As we roll/We laugh at our old things/Bodies continue to fall/The killing’s taking over/There is no end to it all/Don’t sit back and wait ‘til the killing is over/There is no place to hide/’Til the killing is over/Commence with the killing.”  He adds in the song’s third and final verse, “No matter what you do/You are the problem, too/Banging our heads ‘til they shrink/Circular insanity.”  Caesar returns to the song’s chorus again from here, but adding something slightly different this time, singing, “Dig our way down inside/With a fist on the ground and a finger to the sky/There is no place to hide/Commence with the killing.”  Considering everything noted here, it would seem that Caesar (whose last name is not listed on the band’s official Facebook page) is presenting another commentary.  The note in the song’s lead verse that “The trap we set is our own belief” clearly infers said statement.  The statement that he makes in the song’s second verse that “maybe we need to the next scene” hints at said commentary even more.  The chorus, which finds him addressing people who sit back while the proverbial killing is happening is another way in which he seems to make the statement about humans’ inaction when action is needed.  These strong statements join with the song’s arrangement to make the song in whole its own standout addition to The Killing: Part I.  When it is considered alongside the EP’s other songs noted here and the rest of the record’s works, the whole of the record proves to be a strong new effort Zero Theorem that deserves its own share of attention.

Zero Theorem’s new EP The Killing: Part I is a positive new offering from the band that proves the up-and-coming hard rock outfit has promise for the future.  That is proven through the record’s musical and lyrical content, as has been proven here.  Between the heavy musical arrangements and the insightful commentary in the lyrics, the 15-minute record offers audiences plenty to appreciate.  All things considered, they make The Killing: Part I one of this year’s top new EPs.  The record is available now.  More information on the EP is available online along with all of the band’s latest news at:

 

 

 

Website: http://zerotheoremband.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/zerotheoremband

Twitter: http://twitter.com/ztheoremband

 

 

 

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‘Retaliation’ Is A Strong Start For Hyvmine’s Sophomore Album

Courtesy: Seek & Strike

Up-and-coming hard rock band Hyvmine is hard at work in the studio on its sophomore album.  In anticipation of the as-yet-untitled record’s release, the band will release the album’s debut single ‘Retaliation’ next month.  Its planned release comes a little more than four months after the band released its new EP Fight or Flight, and is a positive first preview of the album.  That is due in part to its musical arrangement, which will be discussed shortly.  The song’s lyrical content couples with the arrangement to add even more depth and interest to its presentation.  The song’s production rounds out the most important of its elements.  Each element is crucial in its own way to the whole of the single.  All things considered, they make ‘Retaliation’ a strong new offering from Hyvmine album that definitely succeeds in building anticipation for its new album.

The musical arrangement presented in ‘Retaliation’ is important to note because it is such a stark departure from the more familiar prog-metal sound presented in its 2016 debut Earthquake.  The guitars, electronics and vocals of front man Al Joseph show clear similarities to the best works of Sevendust, Stone Sour and Trivium just to name a few bands.  Just as interesting to note is the guitar riff featured in the song’s bridge.  That riff actually lends itself at least slightly to some of Eddie Van Halen’s best guitar solos.  How’s that for a comparison?  Meanwhile, the secondary guitar line of Alon Mei-Tai and low-end from bassist Chris Joseph fleshes out the arrangement even more alongside the work of the band’s unlisted session drummer. Between all of that and the more modern influences put on display throughout the course of the song’s four-and-a-half-minute run time, audiences get a song here that shows a new direction for Hyvmine; a direction that could help break the band into the mainstream, and make it one of the next big names in the hard rock community.

The power in the arrangement at the center of ‘Retaliation’ in itself gives listeners plenty to appreciate about the song, and it is only one of the song’s important elements.  The song’s lyrical content plays its own important part to the song’s presentation as its musical arrangement.  Joseph sings here, “Your master plan’s a waste of time/I’m right behind/You’re never getting out alive/You’re a fool/You can’t complete with me/Tapped in your blood while you were wasting precious energy/You’ll see your wasted time/I’ve come to take your life.”  He goes on to sing in the song’s second verse, “You broke the rules/You crossed the sea/You’ve made your own contraption/Well no one else can hear you scream/Don’t ever waste my time/Before I waste your life.”  This is a straight forward message that is driven home even more in the second chorus as Joseph sings, “I got a calling/And I can’t afford to waste my time/So enough with this falling/And I can’t afford to get out of line/Don’t care for your reasons/They never amount to what you’ll find/So shut your mouth/You’d best be still/’Cause I’m built to kill.”  This comes across as someone who has been wronged in some way and is not going to put up with the other person’s behavior any longer.  It is full on, proud defiance from the song’s subject, and displays a strong will.  Considering the number of people who have been in a situation very similar to this, it is certain to reach a wide range of listeners.  When this is considered along with the song’s driving melodic hard rock arrangement, the song becomes in whole, a positive preview of Hyvmine’s upcoming album.  Even with this in mind, the song’s content is only part of what makes it a positive new offering from the band.  The song’s production is just as important to note as its overall content.

The production at the center of ‘Retaliation’ is important to note because it is that work that brings everything together.  It can be said with ease that the song’s production is just as positive as its overall content, too.  The call and response effect used for some of the vocal lines between the verses and choruses supports that statement.  The way in which Joseph’s vocals are layered in order to create that call and response effect is a great effect.  On another level, the distortion added to the guitars adds its own depth to the song, too.  Overall, the balance of the instruments and Joseph’s vocals proves impressive in its own right.  Some might see this as a given, but the fact of the matter is that there are bands whose songs have proven not that great because they were not that well produced.  The vocals are washed out by the instruments or vice versa.  They are rare, but not overly rare.  Thankfully that is not the case with this song.  The production keeps everything very well-balanced throughout the almost five-minute song.  The end result of that attention to detail is a song that is easy on the ears not just because of the music, but because of the work of those behind the glass.  When this is considered along with the fully relatable lyrical content, the whole of the song proves that much more to be a positive start for the band in its new album.  One can only hope that the success of this song will continue with the rest of the album when it is finally released next year.

Hyvmine’s new single ‘Retaliation’ is a strong start for the band’s as-yet-untitled forthcoming sophomore album.  That is proven in part through a musical arrangement that shows the band has grown from its debut, and done so unapologetically at that.  The song’s lyrical content supports that statement even more.  That is because the situation portrayed in the lyrics is such that listeners will be able to relate.  The song’s production puts the final touch to the song, making it that much easier on the ears.  Each item is important in its own way to the whole of ‘Retaliation.’  All things considered, they give listeners reason to be cautiously optimistic about the band’s as-yet-untitled forthcoming sophomore album.  More information on ‘Retaliation’ is available online now along with all of the band’s latest news and more at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.hyvmine.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/hyvmineband

Twitter: http://twitter.com/Hyvmineband

 

 

 

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Fozzy Reaches Its Peak With ‘Judas’

Courtesy: Century Media Century Media Records

Veteran hard rock band Fozzy launched the latest leg of its “Judas Rising” tour on Friday.  The tour, which currently runs through September 29 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, includes performances in Charlotte and Jacksonville, North Carolina on September 19 and 20 respectively.  The tour’s launch also follows the release of the band’s latest single, ‘Burn Me Out,’ which is taken from the band’s most recent album, Judas (2017).  Judas is an interesting change of pace for Fozzy at least stylistically speaking.  That is not a bad thing, either.  In fact, the change in the band’s sound exhibited in this record is a big part of what makes the record such an interesting new offering.  ‘Painless,’ which comes a little early in the record’s run, is just one example of that welcome change.  It will be discussed shortly.  ‘Elevator,’ which comes late in the album’s run, is another example of the change exhibited in the record this time out, and another of the most notable of those examples, too.  It will be discussed a little later.  The full-throttle ‘Wolves at Bay,’ which closes out the album is one more example of the change that is evident in this record that makes it another interesting new effort.  Of course it is not the last of the songs that shows the change from the band this time out.  Keeping that in mind, there are also some more familiar works early on in the record.  When those songs are considered along with the songs noted here and those not noted, the whole of Judas proves to be a record that presents Fozzy at the top of its game.

Veteran hard rock band Fozzy’s most recent full-length studio recording, 2017’s Judas is one of the best albums that this band has released to date.  Simply put, it presents Fozzy at the top of its game.  That is thanks to the growth and change exhibited by the band throughout the album.  The first real sign of that change comes early in the album’s run in the form of ‘Painless.’  Musically speaking, this song is one of the most radio friendly songs that the band has composed to date.  At the same time, it doesn’t sacrifice the hard rock edge for which the band has come to be known in its previous albums in order to achieve that accessibility.  It shows similarities to works from the likes of Breaking Benjamin, Five Finger Death Punch and other similar hard rock acts, showing again, that accessibility.

The song’s lyrical content shows a certain growth, too, as it presents a subject in a distinctly difficult place emotionally and psychologically.  What’s interesting here is that it doesn’t just come right out and give away the situation, perhaps intentionally leaving interpretation to apply to any difficult situation.  This is inferred as front man Chris Jericho sings in the song’s lead verse, “My life trapped in between/A whisper and a scream/A suicide machine of my own making/You medicate my brain/Like needles in my veins/Consumed in your embrace/There’s no escaping/My fix I the misery/Won’t stop till the end of me/I can’t feel anything.”  This alone comes across as perhaps someone dealing with the impacts of drug abuse.  That is just this critic’s own take on this verse, though.  He goes on to sing in the song’s chorus, “Killing me one breath at a time/Caught in your web/I’m paralyzed/So go on and lay me down to rest/You make it painless, painless.”  What’s even more interesting is that later in the song’s third verse, Jericho switches things up even more, singing, “Do you know what it’s like/To be hollow inside my life, my grave/Do you love me enough to finish me off/Don’t leave me here this way?” before reprising the song’s chorus.  At this point, it’s as if Jericho is hinting at a relationship issue making things even more difficult.  Simply put, this song is just as deep lyrically as it is musically.  Keeping that in mind along with the song’s musical arrangement, the song in whole shows quite a bit of positive and welcome growth and change from the band.  That growth makes this song just one example of what makes Judas another strong effort from Fozzy.  It is of course just one of the songs that serves to show that welcome change.  ‘Elevator,’ which comes later in the record’s run, is another example of the change that makes Judas an interesting new offering from the band.

The growth exhibited in ‘Elevator’ comes instantly in its musical arrangement, as it opens with the driving guitar and keyboard lines that open the song.  That combination, which runs through the course of the song, gives the song a little bit of an industrial sound.  It’s a sound that Fozzy has used very rarely, if at all in its past records.  The expert balance of the elements along with the solid time keeping (and Jericho’s vocal delivery) makes for an overall musical arrangement that itself shows even more the change in the band’s musical direction this time out.  When that change is coupled with the song’s lyrical content, the two elements make the song in whole another notable addition to Judas.

Where ‘Painless’ presented someone in a very low place, ‘Elevator’ is the polar opposite so to speak.  Jericho sings here, “Step in/We’re gonna take a ride/To the promised land/Heaven is in our hands/We’ve all been down/There’s only one way out/’Cause when you’re feeling low/There’s only one way to go/I’m your elevator.”  He goes on to sing in the song’s second verse, “We crawl through dirt/You know we’ve been hurt/Put your faith in me/’Cause I’ve got the golden key/So wave goodbye/I’m gonna get you high/High above the crowd/Nothing can stop us now/I’m your elevator.”  It goes without saying that unlike ‘Painless,’ this song is quite the uplifting piece.  Now whether the song was intentionally supposed to be religious in its wording or if that was purely metaphorical language is left for the band to explain.  That aside, the positive, uplifting message here, coupled with the song’s equally empowering musical arrangement shows even more the change in Fozzy in this record.  That exhibited change shows even more why the record in whole is some of the band’s best work to date.  It still is not the last of the songs to show that noted change and how that change is a positive for the album in whole.  ‘Wolves at Bay,’ the album’s closer, is one more strong example of that change and its positive impact on the album.

‘Wolves at Bay’ stands out – as with the previously discussed songs – in part because of its musical arrangement.  Its opening bars present a thrash metal style approach before switching over to the band’s more familiar melodic hard rock sound a la Sevendust, etc. in the verses.  That thrash metal approach, which again the band has rarely if ever, used returns in the chorus.  The driving energy in the song’s musical arrangement is echoed in its equally powerful and aggressive lyrics.  Jericho sings here, “You like to hunt/Your game is fear/I was the one, your souvenir/This is a fight/The one that you’ve been fighting for/You did incite the call for us to go to war.”  He goes on to sing in the song’s chorus, “Pushing and pushing/Giving me no choice/Humiliate/Intimidate/Until I hit the breaking point/Back to the wall/Keeping the wolves at bay/Fight my way out/’Cause it’s the only way.”  The song continues on lyrically in similar fashion from here.  Simply put, there’s a certain level of aggression and confidence here.  This is someone saying, “back off, you’ve caused me to be this way, and I won’t hesitate to attack if I have to,”  It’s a strong song and an interesting contrast to the album’s opener.  Those powerful lyrics and the song’s equally powerful musical arrangement shows again the change evident from the band in this album.  That welcome change also again shows what makes Judas such a strong new offering from Fozzy.  When it is considered along with the previously discussed songs and the rest of this record, the whole of the album proves to be not just a strong new album, but some of the band’s best work to date.

Fozzy’s new album Judas is some of the band’s best work to date.  That’s because while it does present some familiarity to listeners, it also exhibits continued positive growth and change from the band.  That is exhibited in the song’s discussed here clearly.  When they are considered along with the songs not discussed here, that change becomes even more evident and appreciated.  When it is considered in whole, the result is a record that every Fozzy fan will enjoy.  It is available now in stores and online.  More information on Judas, Fozzy’s new tour, its latest news and more is available online now at:

 

 

 

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