Aesthetic Issues Are Not Enough To Sink ‘Hell Below’

Courtesy: Smithsonian Channel/Public Media Distribution

Smithsonian Channel officially released its latest World War II documentary Hell Below earlier this week.  The two-disc collection focuses warfare waged from below the waves throughout the war.  It is not the network’s first time focusing on WWII submarine warfare, but it is still enjoyable in its own right, even despite its negatives.  The stories that are told over the course of the documentary’s two discs are collectively the documentary’s primary positive.  This will be discussed shortly.  While the stories do plenty to keep audiences engaged over the course of the documentary’s 360 minute (six-hour) run time, the documentary is not perfect.  It suffers from a pair of negatives, too, the most significant of which is the lack of an episode listing anywhere inside or outside the set’s box.  This will be discussed later and is hardly the set’s only negative.  While the set does suffer from some negatives, it is not a total loss, as already noted in regards to its featured stories.  The re-enactments, used to help tell the featured stories add to the stories.  That being the case, they are key in examining the set’s presentation, too.  Each element is important in its own right to the set’s presentation.  All things considered, they make Hell Below a program that is worth at least an occasional watch by history buffs and more specifically WWII history buffs alike.

Hell Below, Smithsonian Channel’s latest WWII feature presentation, is a program that history and WWII history buffs alike will appreciate.  They will agree in watching it, that it is a history-based program that is worth at least one watch.  That is due in part to the stories that are presented throughout the course of its six-hour run time.  The stories focus on some of World War II’s most significant submarine conflicts including conflicts in both the Atlantic and Pacific theaters.  From the Allies fighting against German U-Boats to Allied subs fighting German and Japanese ships (and even saving allied troops), the stories tell a variety of intriguing pieces of the war’s history.  Audiences will be shocked to learn how Native American POWs were inadvertently shot and killed by American sea men after a German ship carrying them was sunk and the lack of fallout from that event.  Just as interesting to learn is the story of the American sub Harder in the episode “Destroyer Killer.”  This underdog story of sorts follows the crew of the Harder as it rescued allied commandos from Japanese clutches and survived multiple Japanese attacks en route to and from a covert surveillance mission. The sub’s sad fate following its return to its Australian base adds even more depth to the story.  The surprising story of two allied convoys’ escape from multiple U-Boat attacks in another episode is yet another truly interesting piece that will keep audiences enthralled. Between those episodes and the others not noted here, the stories in whole prove to be the most important overall element to Hell Below’s overall presentation.

The stories that are presented over the six-hour course of Hell Below are critical to the program’s presentation.  That is because from one to the next, the stories will keep history buffs, WWII history buffs and audiences in general enthralled with the stories of the Allies’ determination to defeat the Axis powers.  While the program’s featured stories are undeniably important to its overall presentation, the program is not perfect in its home release.  It does suffer from a handful of issues, not the least of which is the issue of its episode guide.  Audiences will be saddened to discover that the program’s episodes are listed only on the program’s menu.  In other words, audiences are forced to play the discs and virtually memorize which episodes are on which disc in order to know which is where.  There is no episode guide inside or outside the box even as an insert.  It may seem like a minor element about which to be concerned, but the reality is that having something as minor as an episode guide makes choosing which episode(s) to watch much easier and more enjoyable.  To that end, being forced to choose episodes only by playing the program’s discs detracts greatly from the program’s presentation in its home release.

On another level, the redundancy of the CG sequences and even some of the re-enactments takes away even more from the program’s presentation.  From one episode to the next, it seems like the same CG sub is shown attacking the same CG ship right down to the ships being hit by the same torpedos.  The same applies when the subs surface and dive.  Obviously this was a cost cutting measure.  That is understandable.  But the reality is that the Allied and Axis subs did not look exactly the same.  By presenting the same sequences over and over again, it presents the image that the subs all looked the same.  To that end, cost cutting might not have been such a good move.  Hopefully those behind this program (and Smithsonian Channel’s executives) will take this into account with the network’s next WWII documentary.

The lack of an episode guide for Hell Below and the redundancy of its CG sequences do much to detract from its overall presentation in its new home release.  The lack of an episode guide makes choosing episodes more trouble than it should be.  The redundancy of the CG sequences is takes away from the program’s aesthetic value on the surface.  That is because seeing the same sequences from one episode to the next eventually gets boring.  On another level, it raises a concern about presenting historical accuracy in regards to the design of the Axis and Allied ships and subs.  Considering all of this, these negatives greatly detract from the program’s overall presentation.  However, those negatives are not so great that they make the program wholly unwatchable.  The re-enactments that are used to tell the featured stories, while at times redundant themselves, add to the stories’ interest.  The actors enlisted to portray the crews of the subs and ships are to be applauded for their work on camera.  The tension on their faces and the very immediacy in their actions drives home the importance of the real crews’ efforts to defeat the Axis subs.  It truly serves to pull audiences even more into the story, even with their occasional redundancy, too.  Yes, even some of the re-enactment sequences are recycled in these episodes.  Luckily though, that recycling is not as common as the recycling of the episodes’ CG sequences.  Keeping this in mind, the re-enactments used to bring the stories to life prove to be another key positive to Hell Below’s home presentation.  When it is set alongside the positive of the program’s featured stories, the two do just enough to make up for the program’s negatives.  This in turn makes the program worth at least an occasional watch by history and WWII history buffs alike.

Hell Below, Smithsonian Channel’s latest venture in to the history of WWII, is an offering that is worth at least an occasional watch.  History and WWII history buffs alike will enjoy watching it every now and then thanks to its gripping stories and the re-enactments that are used to tell those stories.  The lack of an episode guide inside or outside the two-disc set’s box detracts from the program’s presentation to a point.  The same can be said of the redundancy in the stories’ CG sequences.  While the program is not perfect, the positives do just enough to make up for the negatives, thus making the program, again, worth at least an occasional watch.  It is available now and can be ordered online direct via PBS’ online store.  More information on this and other Smithsonian Channel programs is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.smithsonianchannel.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SmithsonianChannel

Twitter: http://twitter.com/SmithsonianChan

 

 

 

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‘Sports Detectives: Season One’ Is A Winning Debut For Smithsonian Channel Series

Courtesy: Smithsonian Channel/Public Media Distribution

Early this month, Public Media Distribution and Smithsonian Channel partnered to release the first season of the network’s new sports history-based series Sports Detectives on DVD.  One part History Detectives, one part 30 for 30 and one part Expedition Unknown, this introductory season will appeal to any sports and sports history buff. That is due in no small part to the sports that it covers over the course of its episodes.  The stories that are presented within each episode are just as important to discuss as the sports that are covered.  The transitions that are used in the two-part episodes round out the season’s most important elements.  Each element is clearly important in its own right to the season’s overall presentation.  All things considered, Sports Detectives: Season One is, overall, a winner for any sports aficionado.

The debut season of Smithsonian Channel’s Sports Detectives is a presentation that will appeal to sports buffs of all ages.  That is due in no small part to the sports that are covered over the course of its 300-minutes.  From the first disc to the second, the series covers all of America’s major sports.  There are two stories from Major League Baseball, two from the National Football League, one from the National Hockey League and one from the National Basketball Association.  They are not the only sports that are covered in this collection.  NASCAR fans get a nod with a story focusing on the legend of Dale Earnhardt’s pink K-2 Ford driven early in his career, one for the horse racing fans out there and even one focusing on the boxing world.  Simply put, those behind the series made sure to reach out to fans of as many sports as possible with these stories  The only downside here is that there is no listing of the stories inside or outside the box.  Even with that in mind, the inclusion of stories from most of the sports world’s major arenas (yes, that bad pun was intended) is in itself plays a big part in the program’s overall presentation.  The fact that the series has yet to touch on soccer (yes, that bad pun was intended, too) gives fodder for more stories.  There are certain to be stories from the worlds of golf and tennis, too.  That is not even mentioning the college sports realm, too.  Keeping that in mind, this gives plenty of material for at least a second season.  Keeping all of this in mind, the sports that are covered and the sports that could be covered in a second season of Sports Detectives show why they are pivotal to the series’ first season.  They are, collectively speaking, just part of what makes this season so enjoyable for sports lovers.  The stories presented within the episodes are just as important to discuss in examining this season as the sports presented within the episodes.

The stories that are presented within each episode are so important to discuss because of the history that each story presents.  The stories also don’t always result in a clear answer either.  The story of Muhammad Ali’s Olympic Gold Medal supports both of those statements.  Audiences learn through this story about how he represented his country at the 1960 Olympics, only to allegedly throw it in the Ohio River upon his return to the U.S.  The alleged incident happened, according to the story, after he was denied service in his still segregated home city of Louisville.  Not to give away too much here, but the story is never fully solved despite the lengths to which the investigative team of Kevin Barrows and Lauren Gardner go to try to solve the mystery.  That the story isn’t solved actually adds to its interest, leaving one wonder if there is any validity to Ali’s story or not.

The story of Ali’s missing 1960 Olympic Gold medal is just one example of the importance of this season’s stories.  The story of Lou Gehrig’s baseball bat is another prime example of the importance of the season’s episodes.  This is one of the stories that is solved.  The investigation here finds a bat that was in fact once in the hands of the baseball legend.  The revelation that someone out there has a bat that was in fact once held (and used in a game) by the legendary figure is in itself incredible.  The history behind the bat is just as interesting.  It is just one more of the stories that shows the importance of the stories featured in this season.  There is also a story centered on famed horse Secretariat’s saddle cloth that is just as interesting.

The story of Secretariat’s supposedly missing saddle cloth is another one that results in the mystery being solved.  What is so interesting in this story is the revelation of how easily it could have and did go missing in the commotion following Secretariat’s win in one of horse racing’s biggest events.  The story keeps audiences engaged because of the twists and turns that it presents as it eventually leads to the discovery of the saddle cloth.  Those twists and turns keep viewers wondering right up to the eventual discovery if it will turn up.  Again, it is just one more example of why the episodes’ stories are so important to the season’s overall presentation.  The story of a flag brought to the ice after the famed “miracle on ice” Olympic matchup between the U.S. and Russia, the location of an NFL Champion’s ring and that of a famed basketball are a few more examples of why this season’s stories are just as important to discuss as the sports that are covered in examining the season’s overall presentation.  As important as the stories presented in these episodes are to the season’s overall presentation, they are not the last of its important elements.  The transitions used in the two-part episodes are important to note, too.

The sports and stories presented throughout the first season of Smithsonian Channel’s Sports Detectives are both key elements to discuss in examining the season’s overall presentation.  They are not its only key elements to examine either.  The transitions that are used in the season’s two-part episodes are important in their own right to the season’s presentation.  The transitions used in said episodes are so important because they are so smooth. The case of the missing NFL Championship ring and the missing “Immaculate Reception” is a prime example of that statement.  Those behind the lens picked all of the right moments to connect one story to the other, thus keeping the story moving.  It is clear in watching the episode that the choices were made not only through the discussions but also through the shots.  This same approach was used in the episode focusing on Dale Earnhardt’s K-2 Ford and Secretariat’s saddle cloth and in the episode focusing on Lou Gehrig’s baseball bat and Kirk Gibson’s home run ball.  Those smart transitions will certainly keep audiences just as engaged as the stories themselves.  That is because they enhance the stories, thus making them all the more engaging.  When this element is set alongside the show’s actual stories and the sports that are featured, the whole of the elements makes this season of Sports Detectives a win for sports buffs of all ages and tastes.

Sports Detectives: Season One is a winning start for Smithsonian Channel’s new sports-based series.  That is due, as already discussed, to the diversity of sports featured in the season’s two discs and 300 minutes.  The stories at the center of each episode are just as important to discuss as the featured sports.  The transitions that are used in each episode (or more specifically, the editing in general) is the finishing touch to the season’s presentation.  Of course one could also argue the interviews, footage and pictures used in each story are important in their own right, too.  Those who point out those elements would be right, too.  All things considered, the debut season of Sports Detectives leaves no mystery why it is a winning presentation.  It is available now and can be ordered online via PBS’ online store.  More information on Sports Detectives and other Smithsonian Channel series is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.smithsonianchannel.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SmithsonianChannel

Twitter: http://twitter.com/SmithsonianChan

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

PMD, Smithsonian Channel Take To The Skies With New Box Sets

Courtesy: Public Media Distribution/Smithsonian Channel

Smithsonian Channel and Public Media Distribution are taking to the skies next month with the release of two seasons of its hit series Air Warriors.

Public Media Distribution will release Air Warriors: Season One on Tuesday, May 2nd and Air Warriors: Season Two on Tuesday, May 23rd.  Much like Discovery Channel’s classic series Wings, Air Warriors focuses on some of the military’s most well-known aircraft.  That includes jets and helicopters.

Season One focuses on one of the military’s most successful warplanes in the F-15 Eagle and its most powerful chopper, the AH-64 Apache.  Season One also focuses on the V-22 Osprey, which ever since its creation, has been talked about both for good and bad reasons.

In the series’ second season, three more well-known military aircraft take center stage in the form of the A-10 Warthog, the Blackhawk, and the Prowler/Growler.  The Warrthog has been under scrutiny by military and political leaders ever since the creation of the F-35 fighter jet, but controversy over the jet has kept the Warthog a key piece of the military’s airpower to this day.

The Blackhawk has been a lightning rod of its own throughout its life.  The chopper has been a symbol of power, much like the Apache.  However, it has been the center of controversy because of the number of crashes involving the chopper throughout its existence.

The Prowler/Growler remains an integral piece of the military’s operations. The Prowler is a descendant of the A-6 Intruder, which played a key role in the Navy’s operations in Asia in the mid-20th century.  The Prowler has been used by the military since 1971. It is no longer used by the Navy, but is still in use by the United States Marine Corps.

The Growler replaced the Prowler in the Navy’s arsenal in 2015. The jet is an offshoot of the FA-18 Superhornet, and has been in operation since 2009.

Air Warriors: Season One will retail for MSRP of $29.99 and Season Two for the same price.  Both seasons can be pre-ordered online now at a reduced price of $24.99 each at PBS’ online store.  Both seasons can also be ordered together in one set at a bundled price of $44.99.

More information on this and other Smithsonian Channel programs is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.smithsonianchannel.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SmithsonianChannel

Twitter: http://twitter.com/SmithsonianChan

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

New WWII Doc Presents Stories From The War Below The Waves

Courtesy: Smithsonian Channel/Public Media Distribution

Public Media Distribution and Smithsonian Channel are partnering to bring audiences some rarely told tales from World War II this spring.

Hell Below will be released on DVD on Tuesday, April 8. The six-part series presents stories of the war below the waves throughout World War II. It starts in 1940 as Hitler’s U-Boats start attacking allied convoys in the Atlantic and the Allies’ response to the attacks.

The series’ second segment, “Hitler’s Revenge,” begins in December 1941.  Following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Karl Donitz, German Commander of U-Boats, looks to capitalize on the chaos that ensued with what was dubbed Operation Drumbeat.  He orders five German subs to sail to New York Harbor and launch an attack there, which they did with some success.

The impact of the attacks on Pearl Harbor and New York are presented in the series’ next segment, “America Fights Back.”  This segment shows America’s efforts to transform its sub fleet from patrol vehicles to predators.  The effort is fraught with danger, too, as is evidenced in this episode.

The segments listed here are just part of the story presented in Hell Below.  The series has three more episodes for audiences to take in, including a gripping story about a June 1944 effort by an Allied sub crew to save Allied commandos in Japanese-held Borneo and an equally powerful story about the USS Tang that will keep audiences just as engaged.

The six segments that make up the body of Hell Below span almost five hours on two discs.  The double-disc set will retail for MSRP of $29.99.  It can be pre-ordered online now via PBS’ online store at a reduced price of $24.99.

More information on this and other programs from Smithsonian Channel is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.smithsonianchannel.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SmithsonianChannel

Twitter: http://twitter.com/SmothsonianChan

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Smithsonian Channel’s New Sports History Series Coming To DVD This Spring

Courtesy: Smithsonian Channel/Public Media Distribution

Courtesy: Smithsonian Channel/Public Media Distribution

This spring, Public Media Distribution and Smithsonian Channel will partner to release the first season of a new program for sports lovers everywhere.

Sports Detectives: Season will be released Tuesday, April 4 in stores and online.  The program follows Kevin Barrows–former FBI agent, private investigator and security consultant–as he and CBS Sports Network personality Lauren Gardner as the pair hunt for key sports artifacts that have either been lost or claim to have been found.

The duo makes its way across the country in its hunt and learn vital stories from different sports’ histories in the process.  One of those stories is the real story behind the Kentucky Derby’s War Admiral Trophy.  Another involves the alleged disappearance of Kirk Gibson’s walk-off home run ball from the 1988 World Series.  The whereabouts of the “Immaculate Reception” football is investigated in this series, too among so many other stories.

Sports Detectives spans 300 minutes on two discs.  It will retail for MSRP of $29.99.  It can be pre-ordered online now via PBS’ online store.  More information on this and other titles from Smithsonian Channel is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.smithsonianchannel.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SmithsonianChannel

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

‘Building Star Trek’ Is An Enjoyable Celebration Of Series’ 50th Anniversary

Courtesy: PBS Distribution/PBS/Smithsonian Channel

Courtesy: PBS Distribution/PBS/Smithsonian Channel

Star Trek celebrated its 50th anniversary this year, and in celebration of the occasion, The Smithsonian Channel (which is part of the Discovery Communications networks), aired a special centered on the series and its impact on the world with its scientific revolutions called Building Star Trek.  Now thanks to a partnership between The Smithsonian Channel and PBS Distribution, audiences can own it for themselves on DVD.  There is plenty for audiences to appreciate about this special beginning with its central topic.  That will be discussed shortly.  The information that is shared throughout the 92-minute program is just as important to note as its central topic.  That will be discussed later.  The program’s transitions round out its most important elements.  Each element is important in its own way to the program’s presentation.  All things considered, they make Building Star Trek a special that the series’ fans will appreciate just as much as scientists and students.

Smithsonian Channel’s new Star Trek special Building Star Trek is a program that the series’ fans will appreciate just as much as scientists and students.  That is due in part to the program’s central topic.  For all intents and purposes, the program’s central topic focuses on the series’ cultural and scientific impacts.  It does this as it follows the efforts to both restore the original U.S.S. Enterprise model for the Smithsonian Museum (go figure) and the effort to bring to life a full Star Trek exhibit for the EMP Museum in Seattle, WA.  The exhibit in question chronicles Star Trek in each of its incarnations.  Though for the sake of this special the focus is on the location and restoration of pieces from the original series for the exhibit.  The items featured in that hunt and work include Captain Kirk’s chair from the bridge of the show’s set, an original phaser and tricorder from the original series, and even Checkov’s control panel from the bridge set.  So while the program really just focuses on Star Trek: TOS at its center, audiences will still enjoy watching the efforts of all involved to locate and restore what are such important artifacts from one of television’s most landmark series.  To that end, the program’s central story plays its own important part in this special’s overall presentation, though it is not the only key element to note.  The information that is shared throughout the course of the program is just as important to note in examining this program as its central topic.

The topic at Building Star Trek’s center is key in its own right to the program’s presentation.  It focuses mainly on the efforts by two groups to locate and restore items from the series’ original set as part of a national celebration of the series’ 50th anniversary.  It’s little different, to that end, from the likes of OUTATIME: Saving The DeLorean Time Machine.  Regardless, it is interesting in its own right.  However, the information that is shared about that hunt and about the series adds even more interest to the program.  One of the most interesting pieces of information that is shared throughout the program is the relatively unceremonious way in which the show’s main set was disposed of.  Audiences learn that the set was basically dumped on a backlot and then cannibalized by students at a university (that is the actual wording used by one interviewee) for their own projects.  One can’t help but wonder if those who made the decision to do away with the set in such fashion have any regret for what they did, now fifty years later.  Just as interesting to learn in watching the program is that not only are scientists working to duplicate tractor beams, cloaking devices and even warp drive, but they are also working to create efficient medical devices to mimic the tricorder.  If such a device could be created and patented, it would potentially revolutionize the medical community as we know it.  There is also a discussion on the importance of recently discovered gravity waves and their importance in the efforts to make warp travel possible.  These are just some of the intriguing discussions that are raised over the course of the program’s 92-minute run time.  There is much more that audiences will find interesting.  Some of the material is old hat, obviously (communicators being the influence for today’s smart phones, automatic doors influencing today’s motion activated doors everywhere, etc.)  but there is still other material—such as that about tricorder tech development—that audiences will find just as interesting if not more so.  Keeping that in mind, the information that fills out the program’s body proves to be just as important to the program’s presentation as its central topic, if not more so.  It still isn’t the last element to note.  The program’s transitions are just as important as its central topic and information to its presentation.

Building Star Trek’s central topic and key information are both pivotal to the program’s presentation.  Its central story celebrates the series’ 50th anniversary while also setting the stage for the information that is used to illustrate the series’ ongoing importance.  While both elements are important to the program in their own right, they are not its only important elements.  The program’s transitions are just as important to note as its previously discussed elements.  The transitions are important to note because they are what keep the program moving, and doing so smoothly for that matter.  The program focuses on the restoration efforts both on the East Coast and West Coast.  So obviously it goes back and forth as it follows the efforts of all involved.  As much as it has to go back and forth, the program keeps its transitions wholly smooth each time. It doesn’t just jump from one point to another.  That is thanks in part to the program’s writing and also to its editing.  Thanks to the work of the program’s editors and writers, the program makes its transitions at all of the right moments.  This in turn serves to maintain audience engagement and entertainment.  As audiences remain engaged and entertained, they will then catch all of the information noted here and more, and will gain their own appreciation for the program’s central topic.  All things considered, it should be clear why Building Star Trek is a program that scientists will enjoy just as much as the series’ fans.

Smithsonian Channel’s new documentary Building Star Trek is a program that Star Trek fans will appreciate just as much as scientists and students.  Its central topic will reach all three audiences (and possibly others) as it makes clear its attempt to be far-reaching.  The information that is shared over the course of the program’s 92-minute run time works in partner with the central topic to add even more interest to the program.  The transitions are wholly smooth from one to the next.  That is thanks to the work of the program’s writers and editors.  It is thanks to their work that audiences will remain engaged and entertained throughout the program, enjoying its depth of information and its central topic along the way.  All things considered, Building Star Trek proves in the end to be, again, a program that Star Trek fans will appreciate just as much as scientists and students.  It is available now and can be ordered online direct via PBS’ online store.  More information on this and other programs from Smithsonian Channel is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.smithsonianchannel.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SmithsonianChannel

Twitter: http://twitter.com/SmithsonianChan

 

 

 

More information on this and other titles from PBS Distribution is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.pbs.org

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pbs

Twitter: http://twitter.com/pbs

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

PBS, Smithsonian Channel Partner To Release New ‘Star Trek’ Documentary

Courtesy: PBS Distribution/PBS/Smithsonian Channel

Courtesy: PBS Distribution/PBS/Smithsonian Channel

Star Trek is one of the most iconic and influential programs in the modern history of television.  It has been argued (and successfully so) many times that if not for that series, much of the technology that we have today might not exist.  It is because of that series that people were influenced to try to make science fiction into science fact.  Earlier this summer Smithsonian Channel presented a documentary feature centered on that subject in the form of Building Star Trek.  Now audiences everywhere will get to own the program for themselves thanks to PBS Distribution.

PBS Distribution will release Building Star Trek on November 1st. The documentary runs 92-minutes.  It follows a team of conservators from the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, led by Dr. Margaret Weitekamp, as they strive to restore and conserve the original U.S.S. Enterprise model used in the recording of Star Trek: The Original Series. The model stands 11-feet and weighs 250 pounds.

Also featured in the documentary is Brooks Peck, curator of Seattle’s EMP Museum. The program follows Peck as he attempts to rebuild a model of the bridge from the original Enterprise by using original pieces of the show’s set and props.

Along the way discussions on the series’ influence on the real world are shared through discussions with the likes of Star Trek TOS star Nichelle Nichols and stars of the new Star Trek movies Simon Pegg and Karl Urban.

Building Star Trek will be released Tuesday, Nov. 1.  It will be available exclusively on DVD and will retail for MSRP of $19.99.  It can be pre-ordered online now at a discounted price of $14.99 via PBS’ online store.  More information on this and other titles from Smithsonian Channel is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.smithsonianchannel.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SmithsonianChannel

Twitter: http://twitter.com/SmithsonianChan

 

 

 

More information on this and other titles from PBS is available online at:

 

 

Website: http://www.pbs.org

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pbs

Twitter: http://twitter.com/pbs

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews, go online to http://wwww.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment news and reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.