Sara Lovell’s New LP Will Have A Long Life In Any Family’s Music Library

Courtesy: Unbreakable Chord Music

Family entertainer Sara Lovell is doing her part to try and make bedtime a little less stressful for parents and their children with her new album Night Life.  The record is another successful offering from Lovell, who has spent a good part of her professional career crafting music for audiences of all ages.  That is proven in part through the record’s diverse musical arrangements, which will be addressed shortly.  The lyrical themes add their own share of interest to the record’s presentation and will be addressed a little later.  The record’s sequencing rounds out its most important elements.  Each item noted is important in its own way to the whole of Night Life.  All things considered, they make Night Life an album that is certain to have a long life in any family’s music library.

Night Life is another successful offering from Sara Lovell.  It is a work that listeners of all ages will enjoy in part due to its musical arrangements.  The arrangements featured throughout the album’s 44-minute run time take listeners in a variety of directions.  The album’s opener and lead single ‘I Don’t Want To Go To Sleep’ boasts a certain pop rock vibe while its follow-up, which is also the album’s title track, takes audiences back to the 80s with its old school R&B approach.  ‘Leave The Monkey’ gives listeners a touch of late 80s/early 90s hip-hop sensibility that couples with a light pop vibe.  That’s just the first three songs in this album.  ‘Rocket,’ the album’s fourth track, is a light, piano-driven piece that lends itself to comparisons to so many modern pop acts.  ‘I Don’t Sleep in a Bed,’ which serves as the album’s midway point, gives listeners a bit of a folk touch.  The use of the guitar, piano and harmonica collectively create a sound that lends itself to comparisons to works from Joni Mitchell and Bob Dylan.  Yet again, here is an example of that continued diversity in the album’s musical arrangements.  ‘Bed Oh Bed,’ which comes late in the record’s run, takes listeners into the worlds of bluegrass and Americana.  ‘How The Jungle Sleeps’ presents a certain edgy and funky sound that is unlike anything in any of the album’s other works, once more presenting more variety for listeners.  It is just one more way in which the record’s musical arrangements prove their importance to the record’s overall presentation.  They never stick too long to just one style of music, nor do they just stick to just one style of music.  They offer something for a wide range of audiences.  To that end, it is clear that the musical arrangements that make up the body of Night Life are undeniably important to this album and form a solid foundation to its presentation.  They are just one part of what makes this record a success.  The lyrical themes that accompany the record’s musical arrangements play their own key part to the record’s presentation.

The lyrical themes that are featured throughout Night Life are all interconnected by the theme of sleep, but are all presented in unique fashions, adding even more interest to the album.  The album’s opener is straight forward in its theme.  It is delivered from the standpoint of a young child who does not want to go to bed.  Every parent (including this parent) can relate to this song, as so many children are just like this child; overly energetic, defiant, etc.  It’s ironic that Lovell counters this in the album’s finale with ‘Lullaby For Grownups.’  That song tells children “When the grownups are feeling all worn out/It’s time for quiet/It’s not the time to shout/They need a story that can take them far away/They need a melody/A close on their day/Just like you/They need sweet dreams/Just like you/They need a kiss/They need a hug/Just like you/They need to sleep/And just like you/They need to know that they are loved.”  The irony here is in the arrangement, because it is this gentle, gliding melody.  As upbeat as the album’s opener is, it would have seemed more natural to give this song more of a bouncy, comical approach than the schmaltzy heartstring puller that is used.  That aside, the two songs still work together lyrically.  ‘I Don’t Sleep in A Bed’ is another way in which the lyrical diversity of this record shines through.  Lovell opens the song with a child singing about sleeping next to his/her dog instead of in bed because of the friendship between the two.  As it progresses, Lovell clearly sings about a child’s happy dreams, of “flying above the clouds.”  There is even a line that celebrates “sleeping in a tent” in a child’s backyard.  On a completely different and lighter note, Lovell takes audiences into the jungle (or the zoo) in ‘Leave The Monkey.’  The song examines wildlife life at night.  She sings about “arguing pelicans” and trumpeting elephants” at one point, even singing lightly about “the party being too loud.”  It’s such a fun moment for this album and just one more in which the album’s  central lyrical theme but unique approach to that theme works so well from beginning to end.  Together with the record’s musical arrangements, the overall content presented in this record leaves no doubt as to why it is such a successful work.  As much as they do to make the album so entertaining and engaging, they are not the record’s only key points.  Its sequencing puts the finishing touch to its presentation.

Audiences will note that, as already noted, Night Life opens on an upbeat note in ‘I Don’t Want To Go To Bed.’  The energy in that composition changes direction, but still stays stable in the record’s title song.  The same can be said of ‘Leave The Monkey.’  The record’s energy becomes reserved as the record progresses into ‘Rocket.’  It pulls back even more as the album enters ‘Sleepwalkers.’  That gradual decline in the album’s energy through its first half reaches its trough in that song, giving way to something more upbeat and light in ‘Scooter and Skeeter,’ which serves as part of the record’s midway point.  No, this critic does not know if that title is a reference to the characters from the beloved Saturday morning cartoon series Muppet Babies.  That more upbeat sense only lasts but so long, though, immediately after giving way to the much more reserved sound and sense of ‘I Don’t Sleep in a Bed.’  That reserved nature carries through into ‘Little Bug’ and actually becomes slightly more reserved as a matter of fact.  Things gradually pick up slightly from there in ‘Bed Oh Bed,’ ‘Wear Yourself Out,’ and ‘Rock-a-bye My Baby.’  ‘How The Jungle Sleeps’ slightly reduces the record’s energy before giving way fully in the album’s closer, ‘Lullaby for Grownups.’  Looking back through the course of the 13-song record, it becomes clear that the subtleties in the rise and fall of the album’s energies in its compositions is actually quite powerful.  It does just enough to keep listeners engaged and entertained in its own right.  That, together with the record’s musical arrangements and lyrical themes, makes the album in whole without doubt, another positive effort from Sara Lovell.

Sara Lovell’s latest album Night Life is another impressive offering from the veteran family entertainer.  That is proven in part through its musical arrangements, which are diverse.  That diversity ensures listeners’ maintained engagement and entertainment throughout the course of the album.  The record’s lyrical theme of night and sleep is conveyed in 13 different unique fashions throughout the course of its 44-minute run time.  That adds even more interest to the album’s presentation.  The album’s sequencing does its own important part to the whole of its presentation, too, keeping the energies in each song stable from the album’s opener to its end.  Each item noted is important in its own way to the whole of Night Life.  All things considered, they make Night Life that will definitely have long life (yes, that awful pun was intended) in any family’s music library.  It is available now.  More information on the album is available online along with all of Lovell’s latest news at:

 

 

 

Website: http://saralovell.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/saralovellmusic

Twitter: http://twitter.com/saralovellmusic

 

 

 

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Lovell’s Latest LP Is A “Wild-ly” Successful New Family Music Offering

Courtesy: Unbreakable Chord Music

This past April, family entertainer Sara Lovell ended the wait for her new music when she released her latest album Wild Is Everywhere.  Her second full-length family music album (and fifth album overall), this 14-song record is yet another offering that will entertain the entire family.  As with her debut family album You’ve Got Me, that statement is supported in part through the varied musical arrangements presented throughout the album.  The equally varied lyrical themes play their own integral part to the album.  They will be discussed shortly.  The record’s sequencing puts the final touch to its presentation.  All things considered, they make Wild is Everywhere a wildly fun new family record from Sara Lovell.

Sara Lovell’s latest full-length studio recording Wild is Everywhere is a wildly successful new offering from the family entertainer.  It is a record that gives plenty of hope for her future as a family entertainer.  Those statements are both supported in part through the varied musical arrangements presented throughout this album. The album’s opener, ‘Get Up,’ instantly conjures thoughts of The Beatles thanks to its piano-driven arrangement.  More specifically, it seems to harken back to the days of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.  There are elements of this arrangement that lends themselves easily to comparison to ‘Strawberry Fields Forever.’  Given, that song never made it to the album’s original pressing, but it was intended for inclusion in that record.  Getting back on track (no pun intended), the hip-hop vibe of ‘Rhinoceros Under The Bed’ conjures thoughts of some of today’s biggest pop and hip-hop acts while ‘Raspberry Pickleberry Wormnut Pie’ (doesn’t sound very appetizing does it?) boasts a bluegrass sound that will easily appeal to fans of that genre.  The jazzy a capella arrangement at the center of ‘Stand Together’ is a fun presentation that is so infectious. ‘Bounce’ will take older listeners back to the 1980s with its comparison to Gloria Estefan’s megahit ‘Rhythm Is Gonna Get You.’  As if all of this isn’t enough for listeners, there are comparisons to the likes of Paula Cole, Etta James and Billie Holiday in the album’s closer/title song and ‘How To Love Yourself’ respectively.  That’s still not the end of the enjoyment.  The spooky fun in the arrangement of ‘The Dark Side of My Room’ is sure to make listeners of all ages smile.  Meanwhile, ‘All The Grownups Get To Stay Up Late’ sounds like it belongs on some stage musical’s song list.  One could even argue that the arrangement at the center of ‘Where You Hiding All Day Long’ lends itself to a comparison to Delta Rae’s hit song ‘Bottom of the River.’  The prior is a bit more upbeat than the latter, but stylistically speaking, one can’t ignore the similarities between the two compositions.  Between that comparison, that of the other songs noted here (and those not noted here), the end result is the revelation that there is plenty for listeners of all ages to appreciate in this record’s musical side alone.  Even as much as this record offers musically, its musical arrangements are but a portion of what makes it so enjoyable.  Its equally diverse lyrical content offers just as much to enjoy.

The lyrical themes spread across Wild is Everywhere range from the down right silly to the more serious in a manner of speaking.  The silly includes the album’s second song, ‘Rhionceros Under The Bed,’ which sees a young child finding all kinds of animals in his/her house, not just a rhino.  The rhino is under the bed while a hippo is in the bathroom, a crocodile in the kitchen and cow in the pantry.  The whole time, the kid is trying to figure out how to get them out.  ‘Raspberry Pickleberry Wormnut Pie’ is just as silly in its very basis.  There is no such thing as the type of pie in this song, so it’s just fun and funny.  ‘Stand Together’ is more serious as it focuses on social unity.  ‘The Dark Side of My Room’ takes a light-hearted approach to a child’s fear of the dark in order to make the concept accessible to children while also not being scary.  ‘All The Grown Ups Get To Stay Up Late’ is one of the highest points of this album in regards to its lyrical content.  As noted already, this song sounds like something that belongs in a stage musical.  If one closes one’s eyes and listens, one can actually see an actor on stage singing this song, hand on his/her chin as he/she sits on a bed, singing.  The lamenting of children having to go to bed early while adults get to stay up late is something to which everybody can relate.  When we’re kids, we say the same things as this song’s subject, yet as we get older, we know we don’t necessarily get to stay up late all the time.  It’s just interesting, the way that Lovell approached the concept here.  Her approach has made the song infectious and memorable because it is just fun.  ‘How To Love Yourself’ is another key addition to the album, as it focuses through its smoky blues arrangement, on the matter of self-confidence.  Lovell sings about a person feeling so bad and needing to get past that negative feeling.  It’s a familiar topic, and the way in which Lovell approached it both lyrically and musically makes this song yet another key example of why the record’s lyrical diversity is pivotal to Wild is Everywhere’s body.  Between these examples of the rest of the album’s diverse lyrical content, it should be clear by now just how much this album’s lyrical diversity does for its presentation.  Even as much as the album’s lyrical content does to entertain, it still is not the last of the elements that plays into the album’s presentation.  The record’s sequencing puts the final touch to its whole.

From start to end, this record’s sequencing more than assures listeners’ maintained engagement and entertainment.  That is because of the obvious time and thought put into said element.  This is evidenced as the album’s energy is so expertly balanced throughout.  From the mid-tempo compositions that make up the first portion of the album to the more reserved nature of ‘Pie in the Sky’ and the next trio of songs that make up the next section to the up and down in the finale grouping of songs, the songs’ energies are perfectly balanced. That’s just part of what makes the sequencing so important to note.  The change of styles and lyrical themes throughout makes the album just as engaging.  At no point does the album ever stick to one style or topic.  That constant variance keeps things interesting just as much as the stability in the album’s collective energy.  When all of this is considered together, it makes clear that the album’s sequencing is just as important as its songs, both in terms of its lyrical and musical content.  All things considered, they make Wild is Everywhere a wildly successful new album from Sara Lovell; one that is another easy candidate for a spot on any critic’s list of the year’s top new family albums.

Sara Lovell’s latest full-length studio recording Wild is Everywhere is a wildly successful new record that is one of this year’s top new family albums.  That is proven through the variance in the album’s musical and lyrical content, as has been noted here.  From hip-hop to pop to folk to even bluegrass and more, the album’s musical variety is certain to reach plenty of listeners.  The show tune style song about the gap between parents and kids in ‘All The Grownups Get To Stay Up Late,’ the socially conscious song that is ‘Stand Together,’ the encouragement to solve one’s problems in the aptly titled ‘The Problem Song’ and more serves to exemplify the variance in the album’s lyrical themes.  Throughout it all, the album’s energy is expertly balanced from one song to the next thanks to the time and thought put into the record’s sequencing.  This is evident both in the record’s music and lyrics.  Keeping all of this in mind, this 43-minute record proves to be a joy for the whole family.  To that end, the album in whole proves to be, again, a wildly successful effort for the whole family that deserves a spot on any critic’s list of the year’s top new family albums.  It is available now.  More information on Wild is Everywhere is available online now along with all of Sara Lovell’s latest new and more at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.saralovell.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/saralovellmusic

Twitter: http://twitter.com/saralovellmusic

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.