Jazz Aficionados Across The Board Will Enjoy Panton’s Latest LP Across The Seasons

Courtesy: Waldmania PR

Diana Panton is one of the best kept secrets of the jazz community.  Over the course of her now twelve-year career, she has crafted songs (and albums) that have entertained children and adults alike around the nation and the world.  Now early next month, she will continue that success when she releases her latest album Solstice/Equinox.  Scheduled to be released Friday, Nov. 3, Panton’s latest full-length studio recording, which sets the themes of life and love against the changing seasons (this the title), is one of this year’s top new jazz albums and potentially one more of the year’s top new albums overall.  That is evident right from the album’s outset in ‘They Say It’s Spring.’  It will be discussed shortly.  ‘September in Rain,’ which comes later in the album’s run, is another example of what makes Solstice/Equinox such a stunning jazz album and will be discussed later.  The album’s gentle closer ‘By The Fireside’ is one more example of what makes this eighth offering from Panton such an impressive new effort.  Between that song, the others noted and those not noted, the whole of this album proves both musically and lyrically to be an album that audiences will enjoy the whole year through.

Diana Panton’s eighth full-length studio recording Solstice/Equinox is one of this year’s top new jazz albums and potentially one of the year’s top new albums overall.  It is a record that jazz aficionados will enjoy the whole year through.  That is proven right from the album’s outset in ‘They Say It’s Spring.’  Musically speaking, this song is a wonderful first statement from Panton this time out.  Its light, bouncy approach complete with soprano sax and guitar couples with Panton’s gentle vocal delivery to conjure thoughts of Diana Krall, Esperanza Spalding, and to a slightly lesser extent, Yellowjackets.  That light, easygoing arrangement couples perfectly with the song’s equally upbeat lyrical content to make the song even more of a solid start for the album.

Panton sings happily here “They say it’s spring/This feeling light as a feather/They say this thing/This magic we share together/Came with the weather, too/They say it’s May/That may be daft as a daisy/It’s May they say/That gave the whole world this crazy/Heaveny, hazy hue/On a lark/On a wing/On the spark of a firefly’s fling/yet to me/This must be more than a seasonal thing/Could it be spring/Those bells that I can hear ringing/It may be spring/But when the robin starts singing/You’re what I’m clinging to/Though they say it’s spring/It’s you.”  These are the words of someone happy and warm not just from the weather but from positive thoughts of life.  It is truly an uplifting statement that when coupled, again, with the song’s equally light arrangement, is certain to make any listener feel just as happy as Panton.  Keeping this in mind, it is just one of the songs that exemplifies what makes Solstice/Equinox another hugely successful effort from Panton.  ‘September in Rain’ is another example of what makes Solstice/Equinox so enjoyable.

‘September in Rain’ is another impressive addition to Panton’s new album thanks in part to its own musical arrangement.  The gentle piano runs, drums and vibraphone that collectively form the arrangement’s foundation instantly conjure thoughts of the greatest works from Lionel Hampton and his band crafted so many years ago.  Yet again, the addition of Panton’s vocal delivery to that arrangement gives jazz aficionados the best of jazz’s past and present in one neat package.  In listening to the song’s arrangement, one must agree how expertly it mirrors the still light feeling felt in early September as summer gently gives way to fall.  Once again, that light energy is certain to put a smile on any listener’s face as it creates thoughts of someone walking along in the rain as the sunlight tries to peer through the clouds on the back-end of a light shower.  Again, it is only one part of what makes the song stand out.  The song’s lyrical content adds its own touch to the whole.

Panton sings here, alongside that upbeat musical arrangement, “The leaves of brown came tumbling down/Remember/In September/In the rain/the sun went out just like a dying ember/That September/In the rain/To every word of love I heard you whisper/the raindrops seem to play our sweet refrain/Though spring is here, to me it’s September/That September in the rain.”  This is only the song’s lead verse, but it leaves no doubt why the song’s subject (and arrangement) are so upbeat.  This is someone having that happy memory of when love first set in, making the rains of September something more positive than negative.  In all honesty, the visual that the combination of this verse and its musical companion creates in the theater of the mind plays out like something from a Hallmark movie.  That is not bad.  But it shows how easily with its simplicity that the whole of those elements creates such a positive and vivid picture.  Panton goes on to sing in the song’s second verse in French, but it doesn’t take a genius to know that even without an English interpretation, the happiness in the verse.  Keeping that in mind, the positive energy in the song’s lyrical is just as prevalent here as in the song’s lead verse.  When the song’s lyrical content is coupled with the song’s equally light and airy musical arrangement, the whole of the elements show completely why this song is another key addition to Panton’s new album.  It still is not the last of the album’s most notable additions.  The album’s finale, ‘By The Fireside’ is one more example of what makes Solstice/Equinox deserving of applause.

‘By The Fireside’ is just as solid a finale for Panton’s new album as ‘They Say It’s Spring’ is an opener.  It stands out starkly (in the best way possible) from its counterparts because of its own gentle arrangement.  The very title creates thoughts of a couple sitting together…well…by the fireside on a cold winter’s day (or maybe even evening).  As with ‘September in Rain,’ the use of the vibraphone and the piano once again conjures thoughts of so many great works from Lionel Hampton and company.  They collectively do plenty on their own to create the vivid image of two people together on a cold winter’s night in front of a blazing fireplace.  The song’s lyrical content enriches that image even more as Panton sings, “In the glow/By the fireside/With you/I’ll be content/In the glow/By the fireside/Every hour will be well-spent/We’ll see our hopes and dreams, dear/Like pictures in the fire/Finding…our heart’s desire.”  She goes on just as gently alongside her fellow musicians throughout the rest of the song.  Needless to say, the dreamy situation created by her own words and by the song’s musical arrangement is the stuff – again – of Hallmark movies, ensuring its enjoyment by Panton’s key audiences.  Even with that in mind, it does not detract from the song by any means.  It only makes it stand out that much more along with the album in whole.  When the romantic mood set by this song is joined with the varying moods exhibited musically and lyrically throughout the rest of the album, the whole of those moods makes the record in whole a sure hit for jazz aficionados across the board throughout the seasons.

From start to finish, Diana Panton’s latest full-length studio recording Solstice/equinox proves to be a record that will appeal to jazz aficionados across the board throughout each season.  That has already been pointed out in the songs noted above.  Those songs are only a snapshot of what makes this album so enjoyable.  The musical and lyrical moods exhibited throughout the album change throughout.  From the somewhat melancholy of ‘Cloudy Morning,’ to the bittersweet vibe of ‘La Fin Des Vacances’ (the end of the vacation in English) to the smooth sense of ‘’Tis Autumn,’ and beyond, Solstice/Equinox takes listeners on a journey that is enjoyable in every moment.  By the time the album ends, listeners will agree that there is so much to appreciate about this record.  In turn they will agree (hopefully) that Solstice/Equinox is one of this year’s top new jazz albums and potentially one more of the year’s top new albums overall.  It will be released Friday, Nov. 3 in stores and online.  More information on Solstice/equinox is available online now along with all of Diana Panton’s latest news and more at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.dianapanton.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DianaPantonFanPage

Twitter: http://twitter.com/pantonda5

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Children and Children Of The 80s Will Enjoy Liz DeRoche’s Latest Children’s LP

Courtesy:  AlphaBeat Records

Courtesy: AlphaBeat Records

Six years ago Liz DeRoche (a.k.a. The Singing Lizard) launched her professional music career in the nation’s capital. In the years since then she has kept herself quite busy, founding a record label–AlphaBeat Records–performing both solo and with other acts–The Pushovers (since 2009) Cane and The Sticks (since 2011), and Tom Goss (since 2013). She has also recorded with Gross on his latest record, 2014’s Wait. She also toured with Goss in support of his new LP. As if all of that isn’t enough, her efforts garnered her the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities Young Artist Grants (2010 and 2011) as well as the #1 spot in Nickelodeon Parents’ Pick Awards “Party Entertainer” category. And since 2009 she has worked with Girls Rock, a non-profit for girls to help them develop self confidence, build community, and make music. One can only wonder considering all that the now San Francisco Bay area-based children’s entertainer has done and is doing, how does she do it all? The answer is anybody’s guess. But somehow she has. And somehow she continues to do so as is evidenced in her upcoming album Club Called Awesome. The thirteen-song record is a testament to DeRoche’s drive and love for her craft. That is thanks in large part to its musical content. Comparisons to the likes of Regina Spektor and Daft Punk are (in this critic’s view) incorrect in regards to the album’s musical content. It sounds more akin to R&B from the 80s and early 90s That’s just one aspect of this thirty-seven minute record that makes it so interesting. Its varied lyrical themes are just as notable as its musical content. Last but hardly least of note in this album is its companion booklet. That will be discussed later. Each element is in its own right an important part of the album’s whole. Altogether all three elements make Club Called Awesome an album that the entire family will truly enjoy.

Liz DeRoche’s new children’s album Club Called Awesome is one of the most standout recordings to be turned out so far this year in the children’s music world. It is an album that the entire family truly will enjoy from beginning to end. That is thanks in large part to the album’s throwback musical content. DeRoche’s sound has been likened over the years to the likes of Regina Spektor and Daft Punk. But in the case of this album DeRoche’s sound is anything but. Instead she has presented here a sound that is (in the ears of this critic) more of a throwback to the R&B sound of the 80s and early 90s. It comes complete with synthesizers, and other standard R&B elements that made the sound what it was in that era. It’s a sound that is very rare both in today’s mainstream R&B realm and even in the realm of children’s music. There are poppy songs out there. There are even more uptempo rock style compositions out there. Heck, there are even rap/hip-hop albums for children. But the sound presented in this record is seemingly rare in the world of children’s music. To that extent it makes the album stand out against its counterparts both past and present. What’s more, being a sound that will be familiar to so many older audiences, it is just as accessible for said listeners, too. It all feels entirely natural, too. Keeping all of this in mind the album’s musical content proves in itself to be a highly important element in the album’s overall presentation. It is of course not the only important part of the album’s presentation. The album’s varied lyrical themes are just as important to the album as its vintage musical sound.

The vintage R&B sound that populates the body of Liz DeRoche’s new album is in itself a hugely important part of the album’s overall presentation. However it is not the only key element in the album’s presentation. The varied lyrical themes that are presented throughout the course of the album’s thirteen tracks. In regards to those themes, audiences will especially appreciate the message of self-confidence despite the country’s gender roles and mores in ‘Be Yourself.’ Hers is not the first song to ever buck America’s established gender roles in her music. But she does present the message in her own original fashion. The result is a song that when coupled with its musical content becomes the album’s lead anchor. ‘Peace Sign’ closes out the album. And while it is the album’s closer its message of peace is just as important to note as the messages presented in any of the album’s other songs. It isn’t one of those preachy songs that one might expect. Rather it is just a song about making a peace sign with one’s hands. She sings here, “Let me see your hand/Raise it high in the sky/Make a peace sign/Point around the middle/Fly/Peace sign altogether/Enjoying one another/Show me your peace sign.” It’s pretty basic content since that is all she sings throughout the course of the (once again) throwback style song. The thing is that even with these being the song’s only lyrics they become surprisingly infectious thanks to them being coupled with the song’s musical content. Being so infectious the message presented will get stuck in listeners’ heads and in turn perhaps grow and stay there throughout the years. For all of the heavy and serious themes tackled in the album’s lyrical content, they are not the only themes that are presented here. There is some more light-hearted fare in ‘Beat Bot The Robot.’ While the robot does play a part in the song, its part in the song is minimal at best. That is because in the song’s story DeRoche’s characters don’t meet the robot until they are well on their way in their trip through the cosmos. The robot is a fun companion for the subjects to have, too. But it is really the journey that is central to the song. And young listeners will enjoy going on that journey with DeRoche’s subjects. The song’s musical content set against that fun journey makes the journey just as fun for grown-ups with its own original throwback sound. The combination of the two elements together makes the song just one more example of the importance of this album’s lyrical content. It is hardly the last example, too. Each of the ten remaining songs exemplify in their own way what makes the album’s lyrical content so important to the album’s presentation. Together with the album’s musical content both elements come together to show why this album is a wonderful collection of songs not just for children but for grown-ups, too. Of course they still are not the only important elements to note in the overall picture of the album’s presentation. The album’s companion booklet is just as important as its musical and lyrical content.

The musical and lyrical content that is presented throughout Liz DeRoche’s new children’s album is unquestionably important in its overall presentation. They work together to make the album one that adults will enjoy just as much as their younger counterparts. They aren’t the album’s only important elements, though. The album’s companion booklet is just as important to the album’s presentation as its primary content. It is presented in a comic book fashion complete with separate panels. Those that pay close attention with note that each of the 4-panel pages directly connects to each of the album’s thirteen songs. They tell their own very short stories. But they also present lyrics from each of the album’s songs throughout. It’s a fun and wholly original way to get young listeners interested in said content and in turn get those same listeners even more engaged in the album. DeRoche is to be applauded for using this avenue to connect to her younger audiences. It is ingenious. It solidly bridges the album’s primary content to this, its secondary content, resulting in the end in an album that the whole family truly will enjoy from beginning to end.

Club Called Awesome is a rare album in the realm of children’s music. That is because it can be said with full certainty that it is one of those very rare offerings that the whole family truly can and will enjoy together. Parents will enjoy the album’s throwback to the 80s and early 90s in its musical presentation. It varied lyrical themes play their own pivotal part in the album’s enjoyment. They range from the serious (E.g. ‘Peace Sign’ and ‘Be Yourself’) to the much more easygoing (E.g. ‘Beat Bot The Robot,’ ‘Club Called Awesome,’ ‘My Balloon’) throughout. The album’s companion booklet presents an original and solid bridge between the album’s primary content and its secondary (the booklet). It is a presentation in itself that is just as certain to engage and entertain younger listeners. It is the finishing touch to an album that the whole family truly will enjoy from beginning to end and in turn will agree is one of the best of this year’s crop of children’s musical offerings so far. It will be available Friday, March 25th. While audiences wait for it to drop they can enjoy the video for another of the album’s songs, ‘Show Me Your Happy.’ The video sets DeRoche’s song against the backdrop of an animated video in which a young child shows what seems to be a group of abominable snowmen (and women) how to be happy. The video’s animation style is wholly original and will impress audiences just as much as the song, which gets audiences to show others their own happy. The video is streaming online now via YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5R4ufdFzIvk&feature=youtu.be. More information on the video is available online along with all of DeRoche’s latest news and more at:

Website: http://thesinginglizard.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SingingLizard

Twitter: http://twitter.com/SingingLizard

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Hullabaloo’s Latest LP Proves Simplicity Breeds Success

Courtesy:  Hullabaloo Music

Courtesy: Hullabaloo Music

Later this month, Hullabaloo will release its latest album I Chew. The album, the band’s twelfth full-length studio recording, will be released Friday, February 26th. It comes almost two years after the release of the band’s most recent release, 2014’s Shy Kid Blues. And needless to say that this latest offering from the San Diego, CA-based trio is yet another impressive collection of songs. That is thanks in large part to the album’s mix of country and bluegrass sounds and its mix of lyrical themes. From the album’s fun, upbeat opener about appreciating what one has in ‘Birthday Fish’ to the socially conscious ‘I Wear Pink’ to semi tribute to the late great Johnny Cash in ‘Flowers on My Shirt’and more, this album impresses from beginning to end. The end result is a sixteen-song, twenty-one minute record that proves to be another early candidate for a spot on this year’s list of top new children’s albums.

Just as with its 2014 album Shy Kid Blues, Hullabaloo’s latest full-length studio recording is any easy, early candidate for any critic’s list of the year’s best new children’s albums. That is thanks to the mix of the album’s country/bluegrass sounds, its deeply insightful lyrical themes, and their accessibility for listeners of all ages. That is clear right from the album’s fun, upbeat opener ‘Birthday Fish.’ On the surface it sounds like a silly song as front man Steve Denyes sings from the vantage point of a kid who got a fish instead of a dog for a pet; on his birthday no less. It isn’t just about that, though. On a deeper level, the song teaches an all too important lesson about appreciating what one has. That is clear as Denyes sings, “Well I was a fish hater/But a few days later/I found myself falling in love/Now this fishy little guy/Is the apple of my eye/And I thank my parents/My lucky stars above.” He is saying that just because something might be this or that does not necessarily mean that it is all that. It’s a lesson that can be applied in any number of scenarios both for children and adults alike. The song’s catchy, upbeat rhythms add even more enjoyment to the song making the song in whole a composition that even in its simplicity is truly a deep work. The fact that the song is still made accessible for listeners of all ages makes it even more enjoyable and important to the record’s whole. It all comes together to make the song not just an important addition to I Chew but a great start for the album.

‘Birthday Fish’ is a great start to Hullabaloo’s latest full-length studio recording. That is thanks to the depth of its lyrical theme contrasted by the accessibility of said theme. The upbeat sounds of its musical content adds even more enjoyment to the song. For all of the enjoyment that all of that brings to the song, ‘Birthday Fish’ proves to be just one example of what makes I Chew one of 2016’s top new children’s albums. The socially conscious ‘I Wear Pink’ is another example of what makes this album stand out, too. It’s a very timely addition to I Chew especially considering all of the headlines about gender roles in America, transgender children and sexuality. As Denyes notes in this song, “The first time I sang this song somebody said, “You can’t sing this song for kids, it’ll mess with their heads”/I heard what they said/I just disagree/So I sing this song for the pink kids like me/Well here’s to all the outlaws both little and grown/You might be different but you’re not alone.” What is interesting here is that Denyes sings this song from the vantage point of an adult rather than a child. This direct aim makes the song just as accessible for adults as for children if not more so. It also helps make the song a good starting point on said headlines and related topics. There is even mention here of a girl who played football, bucking that social norm of only boys playing football. So yet again, it becomes even more of a solid starting point for some very deep discussions that both children and adults alike will enjoy. Adults might appreciate it more than children. But some children will appreciate it especially if they grasp the concept. Keeping this in mind, ‘I Wear Pink’ proves in the end to be yet another important addition to I Chew. It is hardly the last remaining example of what makes this album stand out, too. ‘Flowers on My Shirt’ is yet another example of what makes this record stand out.

‘Birthday Fish’ and ‘I Wear Pink’ are both key examples of what makes Hullabaloo’s latest album stand out early on in this year’s field of children’s albums. That is thanks, again, to their mix of fun musical content and deep yet easily accessible lyrical themes within each composition. They are just a couple of examples of what makes this record stand out. The band’s semi-tribute to the late great Johnny Cash in ‘Flowers on My Shirt’ is one more example of how that mix of music and lyrics makes I Chew stand out. On the surface it is a tribute of sorts to the legendary country music superstar. On another level, it is much more than that. It is a lesson that looks aren’t everything. As Denyes sings, “Well everybody called Johnny Cash The Man in Black/Well he wore those dark black clothes for the ones that were left back/Well Johnny’s always been/A hero to me/I just choose/To choose my clothes a little bit differently/I wear flowers on my shirt/To chase your blues away/Some Hibiscus to remind us all it’s gonna be okay/together we can change the world/And I will do my part/With flowers on my shirt/And love inside my heart…With all respect to Mr. Johnny Cash/I humbly assert/That life is just a little bit better/ With flowers on your shirt.” The statement that is seemingly being made here is that old adage about the man making the clothes not the other way around so to speak. The playful, slightly joking address to Cash is hardly meant as a stab at him or his legacy. Denyes clearly notes his respect for Cash and his legacy here. Rather it is meant as part of the argument that a person’s clothes shouldn’t matter whether in music or any other aspect of life. What should matter is what is in a person’s heart. Keeping that in mind, this song becomes even more of an important addition to I Chew. It shows even more why I Chew stands out as an early candidate for any critic’s list of this year’s best new children’s albums.

All three of the songs noted here are excellent examples of what makes I Chew one of 2016’s top new children’s albums. As important as they are to the album’s overall presentation they are hardly the only songs that could be cited as examples of what makes this album stand out so well. The “PSA” ‘Senator John Arthur Clydesdale III’ will leave adults laughing as it pokes fun at the country’s politicians. Adults will laugh just as much as Denyes jokes about the minimal snack offerings on plane rides. If that isn’t enough ‘Waterfront’ shows to be just as much of a joy as it paints a picture of a laid back weekend evening on the waterfront. It could be a riverfront, beachfront, or any other waterfront. Regardless, this laid back piece is one that listeners of all ages will appreciate and enjoy. The two-part a capella/acoustic closer ‘You Are Loved’ is yet one more example of what makes I Chew stand out so brightly. It is a short, simple song. But it says so much in such a small space. It reminds listeners that no matter what they are loved. It is a beautiful piece that parents can use as they put their children to bed each night both for its gentility and its positive message. The band has posted a video of Denyes performing the song on its official Facebook page complete with signs that can be used as teaching tools for parents and educators alike. Whether for this song, any of the others noted here or the pieces more directly noted, it can be said of the album in whole that it is one of 2016’s top new children’s albums thanks to its depth of material and its accessibility despite that depth. It is an album that every family should have in its music collection regardless of familiarity with Hullabaloo and its expansive body of work. It will be available Friday, February 26th and can be ordered online via CD Baby at http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/hullabaloo11.

Hullabaloo will hit the road in support of I Chew beginning this Friday, February 5th in its hometown of San Diego, CA. The band also has performances planned on March 6th, March 10th, April 4th, and April 30th. Audiences can keep up with all of the latest updates on the band’s tour schedule online now along with all of the band’s latest news, updates on I Chew, news, and more at:

Website: http://www.hullabalooband.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Hullabaloo-220028144692974/

Twitter: http://twitter.com/hullabaloosteve

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Indie Kindie Music Act’s Latest LP Is A Strong New Effort

Courtesy:  Waldmania PR

Courtesy: Waldmania PR

Jeff Kagan and Paige Doughty are likely not one of the more well-known names in the world of children’s music. Interestingly enough the husband and wife duo is nothing new to that realm. Kagan has two solo albums. And the pair together has released two full length studio recordings, all of which have been released without the help of any of the major kindie rock labels out there. And the couple hasn’t stopped there. Last Friday, the duo released its third full-length studio recording Mighty Wolf. Named apparently after the couple’s infant son, Mighty Wolf continues the couple’s long-running tradition of mixing that musical and educational content that it has used in each of its previous recordings. This includes Kagan’s own solo recordings. Even within the context of the album’s musical content, Kagan and Doughty don’t even to one style. That is just one way in which this latest recording stands out. The previously mentioned lyrical content is another important element to consider in this album. Just as the couple mixes things up with the album’s musical content, so does it do with the album’s lyrical content, too. There is a lesson about ecology and a much larger elementary level biology lesson spread across the album’s twenty-three total tracks. Speaking of those tracks, the album’s sequenncing rounds out its most notable elements. While Mighty Wolf consists of twenty-three total tracks, only about half of the presented tracks are actually songs. The other thirteen tracks are set-ups for the the featured songs. The sequencing of all twenty-three songs maintains the album’s fluidity and in turn will keep parents, educators, and children alike fully engaged. That is not to say that the album’s musical and lyrical content won’t keep listeners engaged. As a matter of fact, both elements partnered with the album’s sequencing make the album in whole just as much of a good introduction to Jeff and Paige for new audiences as it is a re-introduction to the couple for those that are more familiar with the pair’s body of work.

Jeff and Paige’s latest full-length studio recording is a good re-introduction for those that are familiar with the couple’s music. For those that might not be so familiar with the duo’s music on the other hand, it is just as good of an introduction. That is because its mix of musical and lyrical content is similar to that of its previous recordings. The musical content displayed in this record is especially worth the note because on that more macro level, the duo even mixes up the sounds exhibited throughout the course of the record. Early on in the album’s run, Kagan and Doughty present a light kindie rock/pop sound in ‘Triple Rainbow.’ This song isn’t the only instance in which that sound is exhibited. ‘Black Widow,’ ‘Beaver,’ and ‘Dead and Delicious’ each have their own original kindie rock/pop sound that stands out from the other noted songs. ‘Dead and Delicious’ offers something of a blues-influenced sound while ‘Beaver’ has more of a light rock influence a la Dave Matthews Band and others of that ilk. ‘Triple Rainbow’ on the other hand has more of a pure acoustic rock sound. These are just a few of the album’s songs that boast a rock sound. ‘Lightning’ also boasts its own kindie rock sound. As if that isn’t enough for listeners, Kagan and Doughty don’t stick to just a variety of kindie rock sounds throughout their new record. There are also Country/Americana variants presented throughout other featured tracks. Those tracks include: ‘Grandma Gatewood,’ ‘That’s Not The Way,’ ‘Aphid Banquet For Two’ and the album’s closer ‘The Great Monarch Migration.’ The couple even included a poppy sound in ‘The Arctic’s Freezing’ and ‘Ungulate.’ The fact that this album boasts such a myriad of musical stylings from beginning to end (and that there are no defined parameters in the transition from one genre to another) is a big plus for the album in whole. It is just one part of what makes this record worth hearing regardless of listeners’ familiarity with Jeff and Paige. The different lyrical topics (and the topics within those topics) adds even more interest to the album.

The various styles of music that are presented throughout the course of Jeff and Paige’s new album are in themselves plenty of reason for listeners to hear the couple’s latest full-length studio recording. While that content is important to the album’s overall presentation in its own right, it is just one part of what makes the album worth the listen. The mix of topics presented in the album’s lyrical content (and the topics contained within those topics) plays an equally important role in the album’s presentation. The central topics in question are topics of biology and ecology. This is nothing new for Jeff and Paige. However the topics that lie within those topics are what really make the picture painted by the album’s lyrical content whole. The biology lesson contained within the album’s songs centers on different animals of the world and their importance to their respective ecosystems. ‘Black Widow’ and ‘Dead and Delicious’ dispel the myths and stereotypes of spiders and certain birds. In the case of ‘Dead and Delicious’ the bird in question is a raven. It is interesting that Jeff and Paige would go with a raven versus a vulture considering the negative reputation that surrounds vultures. The reality of vultures is that just like ravens, they are basically nature’s garbage men, too. They help clear away road kill, and other dead animals by scavenging. That is not to say that they shouldn’t have gone with a raven. A raven is a good choice. It is just a surprise that the duo opted for a less familiar reference. ‘Beaver’ explains through song the important role that beavers play in building their dams while ‘The Great Monarch Migration’ and ‘the Arctic’s Freezing’ are more general. The prior discusses the life span of monarch butterflies while the latter discusses everyday life for animals in the Arctic.

The lesson about biology and biodiversity is just one of the lessons presented in this album. There is also a lesson about ecology presented in ‘Grandma Gatewood’ and ‘That’s Not The Way.’ ‘Grandma Gatewood’ presents the lesson about ecology and preservation through a story about the real life figure Emma Rowena Gatewood. Gatewood is famous for being the first woman to have hiked the entire Appalachian Trail (that is 2,168 miles) by herself and in one season, too. The song tells of her great deed and at the same time celebrates the beauty of the Appalachian Trail. Essentially it emphasizes the need to protect it (and in a larger picture, nature in whole) for the next generation that might want to try to accomplish her feat. On a different note, ‘That’s Not The Way’ discusses the interweaving roles that man and nature play on one another each day. It is a relatively broad topic. But the duo pulls it off quite well here. Together with the lessons on biology and biodiversity, the lessons centered on ecology and nature preservation show in whole why the varied lyrical topics presented throughout this album are just as important to the record’s whole as its varied musical styles. The two elements together give listeners new and old alike plenty of reason to hear Jeff and Paige’s new record. They are just part of the reason that listeners will want to hear Mighty Wolf. The album’s sequencing rounds out the reasons that the album proves itself worth the listen.

The musical and lyrical content that make up the body of Mighty Wolf makes the record an ahem* mighty collection of songs. While both elements together play an important role in the success of this record, they are only a portion of what helps it live up to its title. The album’s sequencing rounds out the ways in which it proves itself to be a strong new effort from the independent children’s entertainers. As previously noted, not all of the tracks featured in this record are musical compositions. Roughly half of its twenty-three total songs are musical numbers. The other tracks are little skits that Jeff and Paige use to introduce each song. On the surface this may not seem like much. However, the sequencing of the musical and non-musical tracks together is more important to th record’s overall presentation than one might think. The introductions serve a double purpose. Their primary purpose is to serve as an introduction to each lesson. The secondary purpose of each non-musical track is as a breather of sorts between songs. They help to break things up as the album progresses. The end result is an increased chance of keeping listeners engaged. It is a smart approach to keeping the album’s pacing solid. That solid pacing combined with the album’s equally engaging musical and lyrical content makes Mighty Wolf a truly mighty new release and an equally mighty independent release for the children’s entertainers.

Mighty Wolf is only the third full-length studio recording that Jeff Kagan and Paige Doughty have recorded together. For Kagan, it is his fifth full-length recording overall. That aside, this latest effort from the husband and wife children’s entertainers is indeed a mighty new release. This is exhibited through its variety of musical and lyrical content. Its sequencing plays just as much into the album’s success. All three elements are equally important to the album’s overall success in their own right. Collectively they make Mighty Wolf a mighty success for Jeff and Paige. Mighty Wolf is available now. It can be ordered online now via CD Baby at http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/jeffpaige and downloaded via Amazon at http://www.amazon.com/Mighty-Wolf-Jeff-Paige/dp/B017YFSL7C/ref=sr_1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1448918695&sr=8-1&keywords=Jeff+and+Paige+Mighty+Wolf. More information on this and other releases from Jeff and Paige is available online now along with the latest news from Jeff and Paige at:

Website: http://www.jeffandpaige.org

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/jeffandpaige

Twitter: http://twitter.com/JeffPaigeMusic

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Yule Be Cool Is A Cool Musical Treat For Any Family This Holiday Season

Courtesy: Little Rockers Music/Waldmania PR

Courtesy: Little Rockers Music/Waldmania PR

It’s officially that time once again, everyone. Halloween has come and gone once more. The candy is all eaten and the costumes are put away for another year. So are the decorations both in stores and homes across America. In their place are the annual Hanukkah and Christmas decorations and music. The annual barrage of holiday television specials is not far behind, either. Considering the vast amount of holiday musical offerings that fill store shelves around this time of year and the overall lack of originality those looking to celebrate the season are left with quite a conundrum. Which of the noted offerings are really worth the purchase? That is a tough answer. As difficult as that is to answer, there are rare options out there. One of said options is The Little Rockers Band’s new holiday album Yule Be Cool. The kindie rock band’s new collection boasts twelve songs that the whole family will enjoy throughout the holiday season. That is thanks not just to its featured songs (which is just one reason for the record’s enjoyment) but to the band’s stylistic approach to said songs, too. That is yet another reason that Yule Be Cool proves to be a surprisingly enjoyable musical holiday offering. Last of note in regards to the album’s overall presentation is its sequencing. While the album spans thirteen total tracks, only twelve are actually songs. Over the course of those songs, the band keeps listeners fully engaged thanks to the energy exhibited by each song. That maintained engagement is a solid foundation on which the rest of the noted elements rest easily. All three elements together make Yule Be Cool a holiday collection that is indeed a cool yule treat for the whole family.

The Little Rockers Band’s new holiday record Yule Be Cool is a fittingly titled record. That is because despite the band–Jessie Apple (vocals, acoustic guitar), Chris Apple (vocals, bass), Liam Moroney (electric guitar, vocals), and Billy Papenberg (drums)–being known largely for its kindie rock offerings, its new collection of holiday tunes is one that the whole family will enjoy. the songs featured on this record are more than just the standard collection of holiday tunes. Those standards are there. That’s obvious. However, there are also some original compositions included among the album’s eleven musical offerings. More specifically speaking, of the album’s eleven musical offerings (the album’s twelfth track is just dialogue), five are original compositions beginning with the album’s opener ‘This Is How It Feels At Christmas.’ It is a fun, poppy piece that comes from the vantage point of a young child in which the child describes the positive emotions generated by all of the classic Christmas elements. ‘Hanukkah Is Here’ and ‘Snow Falls’ are two more of those five total original compositions. The very fact that the band would pay respect to not just Christmas but Hanukkah as well (this isn’t the only song in which the band pays respect to the Jewish community) sets it quite far from other acts and their holiday offerings. And the gentle, almost Vince Guaraldi-style sound of ‘Snow Falls’ will entertain audiences of all ages just as much. It is just one more example of how the songs that make up the body of Yule Be Cool make it such a surprisingly enjoyable musical holiday treat for the whole family. That is not to ignore any of the compilation’s other offerings. Overall, the fact that the band made an obviously concerted effort to not just churn out a standard, run-of-the-mill holiday record here, even with the included holiday standards, is reason enough for any family to have this record in its holiday music library.

The songs that make up the body of Yule Be Cool are in themselves plenty of reason for any family to have this record in its holiday music library. They are not the ony reason that families will want to add this collection to their holiday music libraries. The band’s stylistic approach to the featured songs is another reason that the record succeeds so surprisingly well. The toned down take on ‘Jingle Bells’ in ‘Jingle Bells Rock.’ In comparison to the standard take on the song, the band has slowed the song’s tempo here yet still made it just light enough in its overall delivery to make it enjoyable in its own right. Very much in the same vein, the more upbeat take of ‘Rudolph The Red Nosed Reindeer’ will impress any fan of The Brian Setzer Orchestra. That is especially thanks to Liam Moroney’s guitar work and Billy Papenberg’s time keeping. Moroney’s surf rock style solos will put a smile on any listener’s face, and will have said listeners dancing along just as much. The only song that can rightfully be argued to be a near direct take is the band’s take of Jose Feliciano’s hit song ‘Feliz Navidad.’ While the song itself stylistically is a near mirror image of Feliciano’s original, the band has actually mixed things up a bit here by adding Hanukkah to the mix instead of just singing Merry Christmas over and over again. It is a reflection of the times and just one more way in which Yule Be Cool proves in fact to be a cool treat for the whole family this holiday season. Together with each of the other noted songs and those not directly noted, it can be said with even more certainty that the stylistic approach taken to each of this record’s featured songs is yet another reason that the collection in whole is, again, a cool, yule treat for the whole family throughout the holiday season. It is still not the last remaining reason that the album proves so entertaining either. The record’s overall sequencing rounds out the reasons that families will want to hear this collection of holiday tunes.

The songs that make up the body of Yule Be Cool and the band’s stylistic approach to each gives listeners of all ages plenty of reason to hear this compilation. Both elements together make it a record not just for children but for the whole family. While both elements prove to be of equal importance in the grand scheme of things here, they are only two-thirds of the album’s overall presentation. The record’s sequencing rounds out the reasons that Yule Be Cool is indeed a cool holiday record. Over the course of the record’s twelve (technically thirteen) tracks and forty-six minutes, The Little Rockers Band manages the record’s energy in such fashion that the record never loses its proverbial “oomph.” Much like a perfect wave for surfers or mountain for skiers, the ups and downs throughout the record are so perfectly balanced that the energy is never too much or too little at any one point from beginning to end. Every song stays just close enough to the next in terms of its energy and overall delivery that the record in whole proves from beginning to end a holiday record that every family will enjoy without having to ever skip one song or another. That being the case, it means that families that add this record to their holiday music collections will hear for themselves just how cool it is. This is especially the case when the songs and the band’s approach to each is taken into consideration. All things considered, Yule Be Cool proves in the end to be a truly cool treat for the whole family this and every holiday season.

Yule Be Cool is one of the most surprisingly enjoyable of this year’s holiday music offerings. That is largely thanks to its mix of musical selections. Instead of just being another collection of standards, the band has taken a handful of standards and mixed it with its own selection of original compositions. The end result is a collection of songs that stands out quite well from all of the other annual musical holiday offerings churned out this and every year. The band’s stylistic approach to each of the record’s featured songs adds even more reason for audiences to check out this compilation of holiday tunes. The band presents its own original take on the standards and just as interesting takes on its own compositions. The sequencing of the featured songs couples with both of the previously noted elements to make Yule Be Cool a record that is in whole a surprisingly cool collection of songs for any family this and every holiday season. It is available now in stores and online. It can be ordered online direct via CD Baby at http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/thelittlerockersband4. More information on Yule Be Cool is available online now along with all of The Little Rockers Band’s latest news at:

Website: http://littlerockersmusic.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/littlerockersmusic

Twitter: http://twitter.com/2littlerockers

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Kindie Rock Band’s New LP Has Quite A Kick

Courtesy: Waldmania PR

Courtesy: Waldmania PR

Later this month Rolie Polie Guacamole will release its latest full length studio recording. The album, Chips and Salsa, is a great new collection of songs from the veteran kindie rock act. The main reason that it is such a joy for listeners is its variety of lyrical themes. From standard material such as promoting dental hygiene in ‘Always Brush Your Teeth’ to something more outside the box in the simply titled ‘Acai’ to the promotion of America’s museums in (yes, you guessed right) ‘Museum of Natural History’ and more, Chips and Salsa gives listeners quite a wide swatch of material to think about lyrically. That’s just one reason that this independently released children’s album stands out. Its musical content boasts just as much variety. There is a fair share of standard kindie rock spread across the album’s thirteen total tracks. It is just one style that the album–the duo’s fifth–boasts. There is a hint of calypso in ‘Acai.’ The musical styling presented in the trio’s cover of ‘This Land is Your Land’ is another standout sound. It is one more reason that the musical content presented throughout Chips and Salsa makes it such a tasty musical treat for young ears. The sequencing of the album’s songs rounds out the reasons that this record proves itself so enjoyable. Considering the songs’ lyrical and musical content, it is clear that a certain amount of thought was put into even this element. Together with the noted content, all three elements together show Chips & Salsa another enjoyable record from Rolie Polie Guacamole and one that will definitely leave a great taste in listeners’ mouths.

Rolie Polie Guacamole’s latest full-length studio recording Chips & Salsa is another enjoyable recording from the Brooklyn, NY-based kindie rock band and one that is sure to leave a great taste in listeners’ mouths. Get it? Thank you. I’ll be here all week…or longer. Getting back on topic, the main reason that the band’s upcoming full-length studio recording proves so enjoyable is its overall variety of lyrical themes. Throughout the course of the album’s thirteen total tracks, the band covers quite a bit of ground. There is plenty of standard kid friendly fare in the likes of ‘Always Brush Your Teeth,’ ‘Wake Up Shake Up,’ and ‘Apples’ included as part of the record. It’s not all that the band touches on, though. There’s also a silly piece about a praying mantis included in the record in the form of ‘The Mantis’ as well as an equally interesting piece celebrating the Acai berry in the aptly titled ‘Acai.’ There is even a piece that promotes America’s museums in the equally fittingly titled ‘Museum of Natural History.’ At a time when kids are being increasingly made to believe that their cell phones and video games should be the center of their worlds, such a push to get a new generation of children interested in the nation’s houses of history is fully welcome. On a related note, it could be argued that ‘The Mantis’ could serve as the starting point in a discussion/lesson that could get children just as interested in biology and entomology or the study of insects. On another note, a song such as ‘Central Park,’ which touts all the fun things that can be done in New York’s famed greenway could be used as a starting point in a lesson about physical education. And in an age when childhood obesity has become an epidemic, this is especially important. To that extent, it along with the previously noted songs and those not noted serve collectively to show exactly why the lyrical content of Chips & Salsa is so important to its enjoyment and overall success. Keeping that in mind, the lyrical content presented in this record is just one part of what makes it so enjoyable for listeners of all ages. The musical variety presented throughout the record is just as key to its enjoyment as its lyrical variety.

The variety of lyrical themes presented across each of the songs culled for Chips & Salsa are each equally important in their own right in the grand scheme of the album. For all of the importance presented within that variety, the variety of the album’s musical content is just as important to the album’s enjoyment. For the most part, the songs that make up the body of Chips & Salsa present a familiar kindie-rock sound that is commonplace within the world of children’s music. Though, what makes that sound interesting is the variety of that sound within itself. There is a pure, straight forward rock vibe in ‘Central Park’ that is sure to have young listeners on their feet dancing to the music. ‘Hello My Name Is’ offers up more of a laid back, funk-influenced sound. And ‘Acai,’ as noted earlier, presents a clear calypso sound complete with actual steel drums. There’s even a ska-influenced piece in ‘Bird Bellyfull’ and a piece that Jack Johnson fans will enjoy in the album’s closer, the band’s cover of ‘This Land Is Your Land.’ Whether for any of these noted songs or any of the others not directly noted, it can be said that the variety of musical stylings presented throughout Chips & Salsa’s thirteen tracks makes for just as much reason for listeners of all ages to pick up this album as its variety of lyrical themes.

The variety of both the musical content and lyrical themes within Chips & Salsa is an important part of this latest new release from Rolie Polie Guacamole. While both elements are important by themselves and together, they are just part of what makes this album another enjoyable collection from the Brooklyn, NY-based band. The sequencing of the album’s songs is just as important to the album’s enjoyment as the content of the songs that make up the album’s body. The band never sticks to one musical style or overlapping lyrical theme too long. For example, the album’s second, third, and fourth song all have the standard style lyrical themes that are so common among other kindie rock acts. ‘Bird Bellyful on the other hand is anything but. The same applies with Mantis. Yet what is interesting here is that that pair of songs both present that starting point for discussions on biology even at an elementary level. That is then broken up with ‘Acai’ and ‘Hello My Name Is.’ Neither song really goes with the other musically or lyrically. In the same vein, ‘Museum of Natural Science’ doesn’t necessarily link in with the safety lesson presented in ‘Red Light Green Light’ and the pro phys. ed. lesson taught in ‘Central Park. The album’s final two songs–‘Carpenter Paul’ and ‘This Land Is Your Land’–have a tenuous connection at best. And their connection to the album’s other songs is just as slight. Considering all thirteen songs together, it can be said that plenty of thought was put into the sequencing of its songs. The band keeps things fresh from beginning to end, ensuring that listeners will remain engaged the whole time. This consideration coupled with the album’s varied musical stylings and lyrical themes makes Chips & Salsa an impressive new release from Rolie Polie Guacamole and a piece that will leave a good taste in any listener’s mouth so to speak.

The men of Rolie Polie Guacamole may have released their latest full-length studio recording without the backing of any of the major names in the world of children’s music. That aside it still proves over the course of its thirteen songs and thirty-seven minutes to be just as enjoyable as any album released by those acts that are backed by said labels. That is thanks to the combination of the songs’ lyrical and musical variety alongside the smart sequencing of the album’s songs. All things considered this latest effort from Rolie Polie Guacamole is one that is sure to leave a great taste in listeners’ mouth and a great sound in their minds and ears. It will be available Friday, September 25th. More information on this and other recordings from Rolie Polie Guacamole is available online now along with all of the band’s latest news at:

Website: http://www.roliepolieguacamole.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/roliepolieguac

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Here Comes Trouble’s Debut LP Will Get “Stuck” In Every Listener’s Ears

Courtesy:  Troublemaker Music

Courtesy: Troublemaker Music

Washington, D.C.-based husband and wife duo Here Comes Trouble will release its debut album Goo on my Shoe on Tuesday, June 9th. The fifteen-track album is front loaded with just as much silliness as the album’s title, making it an album well worth the listen by audiences of all ages. While silly yet relatable concepts such as kids wanting desert instead of dinner, playing hooky, and stepping in bubblegum are just part of what makes the album worth the listen. Older audiences will hear some rather familiar classic songs used as the basis for some of the songs included on this record. So it is just as sure to entertain parents and educators just as much as children. And as with so many children’s albums, it also boasts a full complement of musical styles to entertain listeners of all ages. Whether for that reason, for the familiar classic tunes that will assuredly entertain parents and teachers, or for its silly lyrical content, Goo on my Shoe proves from beginning to end that it is an album that audiences of all ages will enjoy again and again.

Here Comes Trouble has crafted in its debut record Goo on my Shoes that will most certainly entertain listeners of all again and again with every listen. The central way in which it proves itself worth at least one listen is with its overall silly yet interestingly relatable lyrical content. Its opener ‘I Want Desert’ is a prime example of its ability to entertain and relate to its listeners all at once. The song presents children in a variety of settings that see them presented with food that they see as “yucky.” It is so “yucky” that the kids each sing about wanting dessert instead. As much as grown-ups might disagree about said “yuckiness” of some of the dishes, the one on which even grown-ups can relate is the meatloaf. It would be a surprise to find one grown-up out there that actually does like meatloaf. This critic in particular definitely doesn’t care for meatloaf. It is to the meat world as fruitcake is to the world of sweet treats. It’s just one example of how the album’s fun and funny content will entertain listeners of all ages. Singer/songwriter Kelly Donohue sings somewhat playfully about every kid and grown-up’s dream of playing hooky from school and work respectively. There’s not one kid or adult out there that hasn’t dreamed of getting out of school and work. Many adults have even admitted to doing just that for that matter. That makes it all the more relatable for audiences of all ages and yet another example of how the album uses silly yet relatable lyrical content to entertain listeners of all ages. If that isn’t enough reason for kids and grown-ups alike to give this record a chance upon its release, then the content of the album’s title track will do the job. It’s just a silly song about a child stepping in some goo. The goo in question isn’t necessarily identified specifically. But it can be inferred to a point that the offending goo is gum since that is the most common goo in which people step. Who out there hasn’t had this happen at one point or another in life? Exactly. Again, as silly as it is, it is again relatable to audiences of all ages. And that continued ability to relate to listeners of all ages all while entertaining them proves yet again why the lyrical content is so important to the enjoyment of this record.

The lyrical content presented across each of the songs on Goo on my Shoes is collectively more than enough reason for audiences to listen to this record. It is only part of what makes it so enjoyable. The musical backing of the presented songs adds even more enjoyment to the album. There are some original backings that will have young listeners dancing along. Grown-ups will also find themselves dancing along as the band–Kelly Donohue (vocals), Jennifer Jones (vocals), Cindy Huang (vocals), Colleen Dyer (guitar), Jacob Chmara (bass), and John Babu (drums)–pull some classic songs that they are sure to identify. The band uses The Weather Girls’ hit ‘It’s Raining Men’ as the basis for one of its songs. There is also a re-imagined take of the Village People’s equally famed ‘YMCA’ that is just as infectious as the original song if not more so. There is also a riff that sounds eerily like the guitar riff from the famous ‘Summertime Blues’ in ‘Robby Dobby.’ One could even argue that there is a slight similarity between the guitar lick used in ‘Alligator’ and the original classic song ‘Wooly Bully.’ Now while those similarities might not hve been entirely intentional, they are there. And coupled with the intended throwbacks to music’s golden era in the other noted songs, adults will agree even more that this record offers just as much enjoyment for adults as it does for younger listeners. That it offers so much enjoyment to both children and adults alike both musically and lyrically shows even more clearly why Goo on my Shoe is an album that deserves at least one listen.

Both the musical and lyrical content of Goo on my Shoe show in their own way what makes this record another fun listen for audiences of all ages. For all of the enjoyment that they offer, they are not all that audiences will appreciate in this record. The variety of musical styles that makes up the record’s body is just as important to the record’s whole as the previously noted elements. The re-imagined take of ‘YMCA’ presents the song in slightly beachy/reggae vibe while the band’s rendition of ‘It’s Raining Men’ is close to the original song,. The band also has its own “theme song’ on this record that will get listeners of all ages moving with its funk roots. ‘Spill The Beans’ offers up a family friendly punk rock sound that is just as sure to have audiences of all ages dancing around as the song’s rocking opener ‘I Want Dessert.’ If all of that isn’t example enough, the jazzy/bluesy ‘Watermelon Felon’ will have young listeners moving along just in a different way. That is meant in the most positive way possible. It is just one more example of how the varied musical styles presented across Goo on my Shoe’s fifteen tracks makes the record even more enjoyable. It proves even more why audiences of all ages should not only hear this record at leat once but should also have it as part of their own home musical library.

Goo on my Shoe shows across its body that it has plenty to offer listeners of all ages. Its musical content is both silly and relatable for parents, educators, and children alike. The re-imagining of just a handful of classic pop and rock tunes will catch grown-ups and keep them engaged, too. And the variety of musical styles will entertain children and grown-ups alike. Each element shows in its own special way what makes Goo on my Shoe a record that will stick in the ears and minds of its listeners. All three considered together, they show this record to be one that audiences of all ages will want to hear at least once if not more. They show together that this could even be a record that some families and educators will want to add to their own music libraries. Goo on my Shoe will be available Tuesday, June 9th in stores and online. More information on the album is available online along with the latest news from the band online now at:

Website: http://www.herecomestrouble4kids.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Here-Comes-Trouble/124855144211765

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainemtn reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebok.com/philspicks and “Like” it. Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.