Arrow Academy’s ‘Terror In A Texas Town’ Re-Issue Is Anything But A Terror

Courtesy: Arrow Academy/United Artists

Late this past July, independent movie company Arrow Academy re-issued the little-known classic Western flick Terror in a Texas Town on Blu-ray.  While perhaps not the most well-known offering from the “Western World,” it is in fact a movie that Western fans and cinephiles alike will appreciate.  That statement applies regardless of audiences’ familiarity with the movie.  This is due in part to the movie’s central story, which will be discussed shortly.  The work of the movie’s cast plays its own part in the movie’s enjoyability and will be discussed later.  The bonus material included in the movie’s recent re-issue rounds out its most important elements.  Each element is important in its own right to the re-issue’s overall presentation.  All things considered, they make Arrow Academy’s re-issue of Terror in a Texas Town anything but a terror.

Arrow Academy’s recent re-issue of United Artists’ 1958 Western Terror in a Texas Town is a work that is anything but a terror.  Yes, that awful pun was fully intended.  That statement is supported in part through the movie’s story.  Written by Dalton Trumbo, the movie’s story follows a relatively familiar plot yet does so with a few alterations to that all too familiar plot.  Trumbo’s story follows protagonist George Hansen (Sterling Hayden—The Godfather, Dr. Strangelove, The Asphalt Jungle) as he sets out to avenge his father’s death.  In the way of that vengeance is the standard evil businessman/landowner McNeill (Sebastian Cabot—The Many Adventures of Winnie The Pooh, The Jungle Book, The Sword in the Stone) and his henchman, Johnny Crale (Nedrick Young—Inherit The Wind, The Defiant Ones, Jailhouse Rock).  One of the most notable variations incorporated into this story is that Hansen comes in not as the incoming Sheriff who typically fights the bad guys, but a man from another land.  This element is discussed more in-depth in the bonus material and will be touched on later.  In other words, this story isn’t the standard man in white versus the man in black story.  It is just a man who wants justice and (not to give away too much here) gets it without going around the town shooting all the bad guys.  That in itself is another variant that can’t be ignored here.  Along with those variants, audiences will also notice that the underlying romance subplot that is all too common in so many other is absent from this story, too.  Its absence here makes the story all the more engaging for audiences, proving even more that a good story doesn’t necessarily need all of the clichés of a genre to be enjoyable.  The fact that Trumbo left so many Western clichés out of this story, opting instead for something more directed and focused also played positively into the movie’s roughly 80-minute run time, ensuring even more audiences’ maintained engagement.  What’s more, the lack of those clichés also is obviously what led to the movie’s 80-minute run time.  If all those unnecessary items had been added to the story, it likely would have been far longer in terms of its run time and even less well-known.  Keeping all of this in mind, it becomes clear why the story at the center of Terror in a Texas Town is such an important part of the movie’s whole.  It also becomes clear why the story is so entertaining and engaging from start to finish.  With this in mind, the movie’s story is only one of its most important elements.  The work of the movie’s cast is just as important to discuss as its story.

The work of the cast in Terror in a Texas Town is so critical to the movie’s overall presentation because the cast’s work is just as simple as the story.  This is not a bad thing, either.  From Hayden’s confidence as George Hansen to Cabot’s diabolical McNeill and even to Young’s work as Johnny Crale, and beyond, every cast member here does just enough to make their characters believable.  Audiences will be especially moved by the subtlety in Young’s portrayal of Crale as Crale clearly is struggling internally with who he is and was.  The way that Young handle’s Crale, there almost seems to be a hint that Crale doesn’t like being a hired gun anymore and has second thoughts about what he is doing despite convincing himself in the end of his place.  Even in the case of Cabot and Hayden, their performances are spot on.  Cabot, even in his few on-screen appearances still manages to make audiences know McNeill is the evil businessman without going over the top in doing so.  Hayden echoes hints of Gary Cooper (which is also discussed in the re-issue’s bonus material) in his simplistic approach.  Between all of this and the work of the rest of the movie’s cast, so much can be such of the cast’s work, all of it positive.  Audiences will see that for themselves when they check out this movie for themselves.  Keeping this in mind, it becomes clear why the work of this movie’s cast is just as important to its presentation as the movie’s story.  It still is not the last of the movie’s most important elements.  The bonus material included in its recent re-issue rounds out its most important elements.

The bonus material featured in Arrow Academy’s recent re-issue of Terror in a Texas Town includes an in-depth introduction to the movie and an analysis of its cinematography from author Peter Stanfield.  Stanfield, known best for his book Hollywood, Westerns and the 1930s—The Lost Trail and Horse Opera: The Strange History of the Singing Cowboy, explains what makes Terror in a Texas Town so many other Westerns and what also sets it apart from those flicks.  Audiences learn through Stanfield’s discussions that while Trumbo’s story was, on its outermost level a Western, it was on a deeper level, an allegory about personal freedoms.  This is key as he connects it to the impact of Joseph McCarthy’s witch hunt on Trumbo, Hayden and even Young.  This discussion alone adds so much more depth to the movie’s overall presentation.  Stanfield’s discussion on Trumbo’s balance of classic Western elements with his own writing style here adds yet more depth to the movie’s presentation as does his discussion on director Joseph H. Lewis’ stylistic approach to the movie behind the lens.  This is a discussion that any film production student and lover will appreciate.  When these and other discussions included in the re-issue’s bonus material is considered in whole, they prove collectively to be just as critical to the movie’s presentation as the movie’s story and the work of its actors.  Collectively, those bonus discussions, the movie’s story and the cast’s work show Terror in a Texas Town to be a work that Western fans and movie history buffs alike will appreciate.  That is even despite the movie being one of the lesser-known entries in the “Western world.”  It is available now in stores and online.  More information on this and other titles from Arrow Academy is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://arrowfilms.co.uk

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ArrowAcademy

 

 

 

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Cohen Media Group Announces ‘Churchill’ Home Release Date

Courtesy: Cohen Media Group

Cohen Media Group is bringing the hard-hitting World War II historical drama Churchill home next month.

Churchill will be released Oct. 3 on DVD and Blu-ray through the independent movie studio.  The movie stars actor Brian Cox (The Bourne Supremacy, The Bourne Identity, Braveheart) as Britain’s beloved Prime Minister Winston Churchill as he led the nation through the war.

In the case of this movie, audiences watch as Churchill wrestles with himself over whether or not to take part in the invasion of Normandy, considering the result of the World War I Battle of Gallipoli.  That battle saw more than 500,000 soldiers die in the line of duty.

In considering whether or not to join the operation, Churchill also finds himself at odds with U.S. General Dwight D. Eisenhower (played here by John Slattery—Mad Men, Captain America: Civil War, Iron Man 2) and British Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery (played here by Julian Wadham—The English Patient, War Horse, Exorcist: The Beginning).  Churchill’s wife Clementine (played here by Miranda Richardson—Dance With a Stranger, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Sleepy Hollow) ultimately helps Churchill as he comes to terms with his decision after the intervention of King George VI in discussions between the leaders.

Churchill is rated PG.  It will retail for MSRP of $30.99 on Blu-ray and $25.99 on DVD.  The 105-minute main feature will be accompanied by a selection of bonus features.

More information on this and other titles from Cohen Media Group is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.cohenmedia.net

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CohenMediaGroup

Twitter: http://twitter.com/cohenmediagroup

 

 

 

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Cinematography, Acting Not Enough To Save Cinedigm’s ‘Hickok’

Courtesy: Cinedigm

This past Tuesday, independent movie studio Cinedigm released its new Western offering Hickok to audiences on 4KHD/BD combo pack.  While the movie is loaded with impressive cinematography and a cast composed of well-known actors, it still sadly falls short both within the Western genre and in the bigger picture of this year’s new cinematic offerings, both on the big and small screen.  That is due primarily to a story that is rife with problems.  This will be discussed later.  The work of lead stars Luke Hemsworth and Trace Adkins’ is one more saving grace for this otherwise forgettable entry in the Western world.  Keeping all of this in mind Hickok proves ultimately to be worth at least one watch, but sadly not much more.

Hickok, Cinedigm’s new addition to the lengthy list of movies telling Wild Bill Hickok’s story is a work that Western fans will agree is worth watching at least once, but sadly not much more than that.  That is due at least in part to the movie’s cinematography.  From the movie’s Civil War opening scene to the seemingly constant shootout scenes that fill the movie’s 88-minute run time (it seems like the movie relies on those scenes more than anything else on a side note, which will be discussed later) to the simplicity of the jail scenes and more, those behind the cameras are to be applauded for their work in making the movie bearable.  That is because they manage so well to capture the energy and the emotion of each scene, whether the scene be something light-hearted, something tense or outright energetic.  The movie’s opening scene, which presents Bill Hickok as a Union Commander during the Civil War, is a prime example of the talent of those abilities.  The movie’s camera crew expertly captured the tension and energy of what it must have been like to be combatant in the war.  The problem with that scene is that it really has almost no bearing on the rest of the movie.  Audiences are left to wonder about the scene’s role until much later in the movie’s run.  This, too will be discussed later.

The scenes inside the Bull’s Head Saloon, while not as action packed as other scenes, are more prime examples of the talents of the movie’s camera crew.  While the scenes are relatively simple, the camera crew’s work does a good job of capturing what is believed to have been everyday life in an old west saloon.  From the guys playing poker to the women working the building as the men drank and played cards to other mundane items, their work expertly captured those scenes, which are among some of the movie’s best moments.

The movie’s constant shoot-out scenes are just as notable as the other noted scenes in explaining the importance of Hickok’s cinematography.  That is because those scenes evoke a certain amount of tension without much effort.  From one scene to the next, the camera crew’s talents are on constant display, even when no shots are fired.  That is saying a lot, too.  It shows yet again just how much work was put into this movie’s cinematography.  When it is joined with the other noted examples and so many other moments, the whole of those moments makes fully clear why this movie’s cinematography carries it—at least in part—on its back.  Keeping this in mind, the movie is not without at least one major flaw.  That flaw is its writing.

From its start to its end, Hickok’s script, crafted by Michael Lanahan, presents so many problems including a complete lack of any back story to set the stage for this presentation.  Audiences know, thanks to the movie’s opening Civil War scene, that allegedly Bill Hickok served as a Union Commander during the conflict.  From there, the movie jumps randomly to a scene of Hickok being awoken, naked, in a tub by a pair of lawmen for apparently stealing a horse.  There’s no back story here, either.  If that is the past that he is trying to escape (the premise on the back of the movie’s box states he is trying to escape his past), then that is not much of a bad past.  That in itself becomes extremely problematic since it doesn’t give audiences much reason to sympathize with Hickok.  The only real hint of a bad past that audiences get comes late in the story as it is revealed that Hickok might have been a Union spy.  Even that though doesn’t play into who Hickok is in this movie.  As if all of this is not bad enough, Hickok’s meeting with evil saloon owner Phil Poe (Trace Adkins) seems to happen as randomly as Hickok becoming the Marshal of Abilene, Kansas as does the revelation of Hickok’s previous relationship with Mattie, who apparently is engaged to Poe.  The problems with the movie’s script don’t end with the items noted here.  From seemingly random scene and mood shifts to other plot holes that the story barely attempts to fill, this script leaves the movie’s nearly 90-minute run time feel like it is far longer.  Thankfully, the work of Hemsworth and Adkins works on its own to make those problems bearable if not forgivable.

Hemsworth, who is most well-known for his work on Westworld, The Anomaly and Infini slides into his role as the infamous old west gunslinger just as expertly as those who recorded his work.  His cool-natured approach to the famed figure echoes back to the days of Gary Cooper in ‘High Noon’ and even somewhat to Ed Harris’ take of Virgil Cole in Appaloosa.  It shows his ability to handle even this kind of role, even despite what little he had to work with in the movie’s script.  It’s just too bad that he had to show that ability while having to tackle his character’s presentation in that script.

On a similar note, Trace Adkins, who is himself no stranger to Westerns—he previously starred in Stagecoach: The Texas Jack Story, Traded and The Virginian—is spot on as the vile Phil Poe.  It would have been so easy for him to overact here, which he has done in his previous efforts.  In this case though, his portrayal of the suave yet villainous saloon owner leaves one easily hating Poe, which is a tribute to his talents.  It shows finally that maybe, just maybe, he does indeed have some potential as an actor.  Considering this, his work shows just as much as that of Hemsworth to be critical in making this movie bearable if only for one watch.  When the duo’s work is joined with the movie’s cinematography, the two elements do just enough to save Hickok.

Cinedigm’s latest jaunt into the Western world is a movie that is worth at least one watch by those who are fans of the genre.  Sadly though, it is not worth much more than that.  That is due in large part to a story that suffers from problems of plotholes, pacing and so much more.  Luckily, the movie’s cinematography and the work of its lead stars makes up for the shortcomings of that script.  One could even argue that the movie’s production crew, responsible for the movie’s sets, and those behind the costumes and makeup, deserve some credit, too.  While their contributions do serve to help the movie some more, the whole of those elements and the previously noted elements still are not enough to make up for a story that misses every one of its marks.  It is available now in stores and online.  More information on this and other titles from Cinedigm is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.cinedigmentertainment.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/Cinedigm

Twitter: http://twitter.com/cinedigm

 

 

 

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Eagle Rock Entertainment To Release Special New Live Concert Recording Next Month

Courtesy: Eagle Rock Entertainment

Eagle Rock Entertainment is bringing audiences a very special new live recording from famed Academy Award®-winning composer Hanz Zimmer this fall.

Hans Zimmer: Live in Prague will be released Nov. 3 on DVD, Blu-ray, 2CD and 4 LP platforms.  The performance will feature Zimmer conducting a massive musical ensemble that includes a band, orchestra and choir, and The Smiths guitarist Johnny Marr as they perform some of the most beloved film-based songs that he has composed over the course of his decades-long career.  Those songs include compositions from the soundtracks of the Da Vinci Code, Rain Man, Pirates of the Caribbean and much more.

The concert presented in the recording was captured May 7, 2016 in Prague, Czech Republic and includes a powerhouse light show and more to accompany Zimmer and his fellow performers.  The recording’s full track listing is noted below.

TRACK LISTING

1) Medley: Driving (Driving Miss Daisy) / Discombobulate (Sherlock Holmes) / Zoosters Breakout (Madagascar)

2) Medley: Crimson Tide / 160 BPM (Angels And Demons)

3) Gladiator Medley: The Wheat / The Battle / Elysium / Now We Are Free

4) Chevaliers De Sangreal (The Da Vinci Code)

5) The Lion King Medley: Circle Of Life (Prelude) / King Of Pride Rock

6) Pirates Of The Caribbean Medley: Captain Jack Sparrow / One Day / Up Is Down / He’s A Pirate

7) You’re So Cool (True Romance)

8) Rain Man: Main Theme

9) What Are You Going To Do When You Are Not Saving The World (Man Of Steel)

10) Journey To The Line (The Thin Red Line)

11) The Electro Suite (themes from The Amazing Spider Man 2)

12) The Dark Knight Medley: Why So Serious? / Like A Dog Chasing Cars / Why Do We Fall / Introduce A Little Anarchy / The Fire Rises

13) Aurora

14) Interstellar Medley: Day One / Cornfield Chase / No Time For Caution / Stay 15) Inception Medley: Half Remembered Dream / Dream Is Collapsing / Mombasa / Time

More information on this and other titles from Eagle Rock Entertainment is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.eagle-rock.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/EagleRockEnt

Twitter: http://twitter.com/EagleRockNews

 

 

 

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Film Movement Bringing Blues Doc Home This Summer

Courtesy: Film Movement

Independent film studio Film Movement is taking audiences on a journey into the history of the blues this summer.

Film Movement will release its documentary I Am The Blues Tuesday, Aug. 8 on DVD and Digital HD.  The documentary, originally released theatrically in 2015, takes audiences on a tour of the places that formed the foundations of the blues, meeting the people who helped form those bases along the way.

The places include the swamps of the Louisiana bayou, the juke joints of the Mississippi Delta and the hidden gems of the famed “Chitlin Circuit” that so many of the blues founders traveled decades ago. Those founders include the likes of Bobby Rush–who won his first-ever Grammy® with his latest recording Porcupine Meat, which Rush released at the age of 83—Barbara Lynn, Little Freddie King, Lazy Lester, Henry Gray, Carol Fran, Bilbo Walker and many others.

Audiences can view a trailer for the award-winning, 106-minute documentary online now here.  More information on this and other titles from Film Movement is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.filmmovement.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/filmmovement

Twitter: http://twitter.com/Film_Movement

 

 

 

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‘Car Wash’ BD Re-Issue Is A Must See For Any Classic Movie Fan

Courtesy: Shout! Factory

The summer movie season is officially in swing once again, but sadly, Hollywood’s “Big Six” studios haven’t really turned out much about which audiences can be excited.  That leaves one wondering what alternatives are available.  One answer comes in the form of Shout! Factory’s recent re-issue of the classic dramedy Car Wash.  Released June 20 on Blu-ray, this 1976 flick is the polar opposite of everything in theaters today and almost everything before with few exceptions.  That is due in part to the movie’s story, one of its key elements to examine.  It will be discussed shortly.  The movie’s soundtrack is just as important to note believe it or not.  It will be discussed later.  The soundtrack is discussed at more length in the movie’s bonus material, which in itself is important to note.  Each element noted here is important in its own right to the whole of Car Wash’s presentation in its recent re-issue.  All things considered, Shout! Factory’s recent re-issue of Car Wash is a solid alternative to Hollywood’s annual lack of summer entertainment.

Shout! Factory’s recent re-issue of Universal Pictures’ classic dramedy Car Wash is an enjoyable alternative to Hollywood’s annual lack of entertaining summer fare.  That is due in part to the story at the center of the movie.  The story is relatively simple.  It follows a group of car wash employees over the course of a single day on the job. It sounds simple, and it is.  But it’s that simplicity that makes the story so interesting even with all of the different story lines.  Far too often in today’s movies, multiple story lines are the norm, and far too often, those multiple story lines mess up said movies because said movies’ writers don’t know how to balance the stories.  That wasn’t the case here.  Script writer Joel Schumacher (yes, the same one responsible for those awful Batman movies) actually did an applause worthy job in balancing each character’s story within the bigger picture of the story’s script.  That ability to balance the stories ensures audiences engagement from beginning to end.

On another level, the story’s aesthetic elements add even more to its surprising enjoyment.  It balances just as well its dramatic elements and its more comedic moments, making the story even more entertaining.  Viewers will laugh as one of the guys stuffs his friend’s sandwich with hot peppers and as George Carlin’s taxi driver looks for a woman who tried to get a free ride in his cab, trying to get his money.  What’s interesting about his performance is that one can’t help but wonder if Bill Murray might have taken Carlin’s performance as inspiration for his performance in Caddyshack.  Putting the pair’s performances side by side, one can’t ignore the similarity in the characters’ portrayals.  Getting back on track, audiences will be just as entertained in the story’s more moving moments such as when T.C. tries to woo a certain young lady and when Duane tries to rob the car wash (not to give away too much).  Between these moments and so many more, the balance of the story’s humorous and heartfelt elements makes the story even more entertaining.  Doing a comparison to certain other movies, one can’t help but compare that balance to that presented in Friday.  Stylistically, the two stories are very similar in that aspect.  Keeping that in mind, it shows potentially the long reach that this story has had.  Considering that and the balance in the story’s multiple lines, it becomes clear why Car Wash’s story is central to its presentation in more ways than one.  It is of course just one of the movie’s important elements.  Its soundtrack is an important element to note, too.

The story at the center of Car Wash is central to its presentation not just because it is the story, but because of the balance in its multiple arcs and aesthetic elements.  That balance ensures audiences’ engagement throughout the course of the classic dramedy.  Even with this in mind, it is not the movie’s only important element.  The movie’s soundtrack is just as important to note.  That’s because it isn’t just a random soundtrack.  In fact, as is discussed in the bonus material, it is actually its own part of the movie.  As is noted, the movie is actually built around its soundtrack.  The songs are deliberately placed alongside each scene in order to heighten each scene’s appropriate emotion.  Such a practice is something rare nowadays in most films.  It shows, too, with so many soundtracks just overflowing with Top 40 and rock songs.  Given, the songs included in this movie are major radio hits to this day.  But they were strategically placed, and quite well at that.  Even more interesting to note is that the movie’s title song was released before the movie even hit theaters.  That, too is noted in the movie’s bonus material, which will be discussed shortly.  Considering the deliberate, well thought out placement of the movie’s soundtrack, it goes a long way toward adding to the movie’s entertainment especially taking into account the knowledge of that intentional placement.  Keeping this in mind, it becomes fully clear why the soundtrack around which Car Wash’s story is built is just as important as the movie’s story.  It is not the last of the movie’s important elements either.  Those previously noted bonus materials round out the movie’s most important elements in its recent re-issue.

The bonus material included in Car Wash’s recent Blu-ray re-issue via Shout! Factory are important to the movie’s presentation because they, surprisingly, create the movie’s backbone.  It is through Producer Gary Stromberg’s discussions that audiences learn about the movie’s story being created around its soundtrack rather than the other way around.  His discussion also reveals the tidbit about the movie’s title song being released to radio in order to build excitement about the movie.  Audiences will be surprised to learn just how much excitement that approach built.  For those unfamiliar with the song, the discussion on the song along provides an interesting history behind the composition.  As if that isn’t enough, Stromberg reveals he was still a struggling college student when the idea for Car Wash came about.  Audiences will be surprised to learn this piece of history, considering how popular the movie has gone on to become in the now almost 41 years since it debuted—on Oct. 22, 1976.  Stromberg’s discussions on the Soul train dancers being hired to dance at the movie’s premiere, how the story was scripted, and more are just as enlightening as his other discussions, too.  Considering all of this, Stromberg’s overall discussions form a solid foundation for Car Wash in its recent re-issue.  Looking back in hindsight, it is recommended that audiences watch this discussion before taking in the movie because of the groundwork that it lays.

Stromberg’s thoughts are not the only important input presented through the movie’s bonus material in its recent re-issue. Schumacher’s own commentary throughout the movie offers its own interest.  That will be left for audiences to discover for themselves.  His commentary, when coupled with that of Stromberg, creates a solid foundation for Car Wash proving finally just how important the movie’s bonus material is to its whole.  Keeping this in mind, the movie’s bonus material proves to be just as important to its presentation as its soundtrack and story in making it entertaining in its recent re-issue. Keeping all of this in mind, the movie in whole proves to be, again, a solid alternative to anything that Hollywood’s current lack of worthwhile entertainment.

Shout! Factory’s recent Car Wash re-issue is a classic that was well-deserving of being unearthed.  In a time when Hollywood’s Big Six are struggling to turn out anything truly meaningful or even memorable, its balance of heart and humor couples with its equally well-balanced story lines to make it a movie that will resonate with any true classic movie buff and that shows how far Hollywood has fallen from its former glory.  With that in mind, it is – once again – a movie that will entertain any audience looking for an alternative to Hollywood’s current fare.  It is available now in stores and online and can be ordered online direct via Shout! Factory’s online store.  More information on this and other titles from Shout! Factory is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.shoutfactory.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/shoutfactoryofficial

Twitter: http://twitter.com/ShoutFactory

 

 

 

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Public Media Distribution Re-Issuing ‘Room On The Broom’

Courtesy: NCircle Entertainment

There’s always room for more…on the broom.

Public Media Distribution announced Tuesday that it will re-issue the small-screen adaptation of author Julia Donaldson’s book Room on the Broom this summer.  Released via Magic Light Pictures and Orange Eye and featuring the voices of Simon Pegg (Star Trek, Star Trek Into Darkness, Star Trek Beyond), Gillian Anderson (The X-Files, The Last King of Scotland, The Fall), Rob Brydon (Cinderella, Lock Stock and Two Smoking Barrels, The Huntsman: Winter’s War) and others, the DVD will retail for MSRP of $12.99.

The movie’s story follows the journey of a witch (voiced by Anderson) and her pet dog (voiced by Martin Clumes – Shakespeare in Love, Kipper, Doc Martin) as they try to recover some lost items.  Along the way, the pair is joined by a kindly bird, cat and frog, who help save the witch from a dragon.

The new re-issue comes with the same bonus material included in the DVD’s previous 2013 release.  Those bonuses include a behind-the-scenes featurette, live performance from Donaldson and art gallery.

Room on the Broom can be ordered direct from the NCircle online store at http://www.ncircleentertainment.com/room-on-the-broom/843501008041.  To find out about even more releases from NCircle Entertainment, parents can go online to http://www.facebook.com/NCircleEntertainment or the company’s official website, http://www.NCircleEntertainment.com.

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.