Eagle Rock’s New Alan Jackson Profile Will Appeal To Country Music Fans In Towns Of All Sizes

Courtesy: Eagle Rock Entertainment

Country music star Alan Jackson has done it all, it seems, over the course of his career.  He has sold more than 80 million records, reached the top spot on the Billboard Hot Singles & Tracks Chart at least 35 times, received two Grammy® Awards 16 Country Music Association Awards, 17 Academy of Country Music Awards, and is a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame just to name a handful of accomplishments.  His albums have gone platinum no fewer than nine times, to boot.  He has played at the Grand Ole Opry multiple times, too.  All of this was accomplished by a man whose roots go back to a small southern town, so it makes sense that that is the title of Eagle Rock Entertainment’s new profile of Jackson, Small Town Southern Man.  Released late last month, the 90-minute documentary tells the story of Jackson’s life and career from his childhood in a small Georgia town to his reaching the peak of his career, becoming a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame.  That story forms the foundation of the documentary and will be addressed shortly.  The documentary’s editing is just as worth noting as the story itself.  The doc’s average price point proves to be money well-spent considering the editing and story.  Each item noted here is important in its own way to the whole of Small Town Southern Man.  All things considered, they make the documentary a presentation that proves big things can, and often do, come in small packages.

Eagle Rock Entertainment’s recently released Alan Jackson profile Small Town Southern Man is a presentation that will appeal just as much to Jackson’s fans as it will to country music fans in general.  That is due in large part to the story at the center of the documentary.  The story follows Jackson’s life and career from his humble beginnings in a small Georgia town to his nationwide fame, now decades into his career.  The story is told through the words of Jackson’s family and friends, including, but not limited to his parents and sisters, fellow musicians and executives at his label.  Audiences learn early on in the story that it was Jackson’s second hit single, not his first, that broke him into the mainstream.  It’s hardly the first time that such a scenario has happened for a band or a performer.  That is important to note because it serves as one more reminder that in the entertainment industry, it takes work to gain any level of success.  Success doesn’t always happen on the first try.  As the story progresses, viewers also learn that ‘Chattahoochie,’ another of Jackson’s hit singles, almost did not happen.  Those with knowledge of the story explain how the song stood out, at the time, from so much other country music, especially as it pertained to the song’s video, and the long term impact of the song.  It is pointed out that some of Jackson’s songs were written by people other than himself, but additionally pointed out that he still wrote the majority of his songs, and has still managed quite the success even with that balance.  As if all of that is not enough, viewers also hear from other well-known country music figures about their own view of his role in their development.  Jackson himself is featured through a series of vintage interviews to add even more to the story, enhancing the story even more.  The story at the center of Small Town Southern Man goes a long way toward making the DVD a positive offering from Eagle Rock Entertainment for Jackson’s fans and those of country music in general.  It is just one part of what makes the DVD a positive offering.  The story’s editing adds to its interest in its own right.

The editing that went into Small Town Southern Man deserves its own share of attention as it did a lot to help tell the story at the documentary’s center.  The live footage featured throughout the documentary make for solid transition points, cutting at just the right moments to help tell the story.  The division of the interviews throughout the course of the program shows the amount of time and effort put into making sure the story flows as well as possible, too.  Viewers will also appreciate the precise placement of the pictures and music video segments in their connection to the story.  They start and stop at all of the right points, and are used at all of the right spots to help keep viewers engaged and entertained.  What’s more, their use at those points plays into the program’s pacing, too.  This is important to note in that there are certain points as the story progresses where it feels that it should have ended but didn’t end.  Luckily, the editors’ work in assembling the story helped make up for the problem of those non-endings, keeping viewers watching even as the story continues past those points.  That is a strong statement about the editors’ talents.  Keeping all of this in mind, the work of the doc’s editors couples with the story directly to prove even more why this presentation will appeal to country music fans in general and Alan Jackson fans.  Considering that deep appeal, it makes the DVD’s average price point money well-spent for the noted viewers.

The average price point for Small Town Southern Man is $7.86.  That price is obtained by averaging prices at Amazon, Walmart, Barnes & Noble Booksellers and Best Buy.  At the time of this review’s posting, the DVD was not listed at Target and Books-A-Million.  Considering the fact that other standard documentaries on DVD can range from $15 and up, a DVD documentary that does not even break the $10 level – even within its own listing at the noted retailers – is even more positive for the DVD.  Given, there is no bonus content featured with the DVD, but the fact that there is no extra content makes that price point all the more acceptable and affordable.  To that end, the pricing is the proverbial cherry on top for this DVD.  It is one more way in which the DVD establishes its appeal to the noted audiences.  When it is considered with the DVD’s content and editing, the whole of the elements makes Small Town Southern Man a presentation that Alan Jackson and country music fans in every town will enjoy.

Eagle Rock Entertainment’s new Alan Jackson documentary Small Town Southern Man is a positive new offering for Jackson’s fans and for country music fans alike.  That is made evident in part through the DVD’s story, which establishes the DVD’s foundation.  That program’s editing goes a long way toward ensuring viewers’ engagement and entertainment, too.  Considering that content and editing, the DVD’s average (and separate) price point of less than $10 makes this a DVD that any country music fan and Alan Jackson fan can afford.  Those fans will also appreciate that lower price point, in comparison to the prices of other similar style DVDs from other companies on other topics that have the same amount of content.  Each item is important in its own way to the whole of the DVD.  All things considered, they make the DVD a presentation that Alan Jackson and country music fans in every town big and small will appreciate.  Small Town Southern Man is available now.  More information on the DVD is available online now along with all of Alan Jackson’s latest news and more at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.alanjackson.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/OfficialAlanJackson

Twitter: http://twitter.comOfficialJackson

 

 

 

More information on this and other titles from Eagle Rock Entertainment is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.eagle-rock.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/EagleRockEnt

Twitter: http://twitter.com/EagleRockNews

 

 

 

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The Appeal For ‘The Andromeda Strain’ BD Re-Issue Will Spread Like A Virus Among Audiences

Courtesy: MVD Entertainment Group/Universal Pictures

Michael Crichton was one of the greatest literary minds of his time during his life.  He was, for all intents and purposes, the second coming of Jules Verne.  That is because his novels, like those of Verne, told stories that were so far ahead of their time.  Jurassic Park, for instance was not so much about a bunch of dinosaurs living on an island, but rather the issue of cloning before it become a major topic for scientists and news agencies to talk about daily.  Now it is everywhere.  Next focused on genetics and government control thereof before the news ever picked up on the issues, such as drug companies using people’s blood types to control the drug industry and people being able to pick the gender of their babies with their doctors.  In The Andromeda Strain, one of his earliest works, Crichton addressed the issue of germ warfare and the issue of what constitutes “intelligent” life from other worlds other than our own.  That book was adapted to the silver screen in 1971, and subsequently released (and re-issued multiple times) to home viewers.  Early last month, Arrow Video re-issued the movie again, this time on Blu-ray, resurrecting the chilling plague outbreak story for a whole new generation of sci-fi and horror fans.  The noted audiences are certain to appreciate the noted story, which forms the foundation of the movie.  The bonus content featured with the movie’s latest re-issue adds even more to its presentation.  The companion booklet that is also featured with the movie’s re-issue is yet another positive touch to its overall presentation.  Each item noted here plays its own key part in the whole of The Andromeda Strain.  They certainly are not the only key elements that one can examine.  One could also examine additional items, such as the movie’s cinematography, its casting and even the work of the movie’s cast by relation.  All things considered, they make The Andromeda Strain an welcome addition to the home library of any science fiction (and more specifically Michael Crichton) fan.

Plague outbreak stories seem to be a favorite go-to for Hollywood’s major studios.  From the likes of The Last Man on Earth (1964), The Masque of the Red Death (1989) and Outbreak (1995) to the likes of And The Band Played On (1993), 12 Monkeys (1995) and The Andromeda Strain (1971) and so many others, Hollywood’s major studios seem to love stories about plagues.  To that end, it makes sense that early last month, the latter of the noted group of movies – The Andromeda Strain – would re-issue that movie.  Released June 4, it was re-issued this time on Blu-ray.  Fans of the outbreak genre, fans of Michael Crichton’s works and sci-fi fans in general have plenty to appreciate in this latest re-issue, starting with the movie’s story. The story at the center of The Andromeda Strain follows a group of scientists that is working to contain a space-borne virus brought back to Earth on a satellite that mysteriously crashed to Earth in a quiet town in the American Southwest.  As the story progresses, it is eventually discovered — not to give away too much — that the virus being aboard the satellite might not have been quite as coincidental as originally thought.  The antidote (of sorts) is eventually discovered, thanks to two lone survivors from the town – an old man and a baby.  The story in whole harkens back to the sci-fi flicks of the 1950s and 60s turned out by Universal Pictures, whose stories centered on the military’s atomic testing leading to all kinds of problems for mankind.  Again, not to give away too much, but there is a very close similarity between those stories and this work.  It is also addressed in the bonus features included in The Andromeda Strain’s bonus material.  That will be addressed a little later.  Keeping that in mind, this story will appeal to a wide range of viewers, even despite its pacing issues.

It becomes clear through everything  noted so far, that the story at the center of The Andromeda Strain builds a strong foundation for Arrow Video’s recent re-issue of the movie.  The bonus content featured with the movie’s recent re-issue strengthens that foundation even more.  That is because this re-issue features some previously presented bonus content and some new material in one setting.  Among the most notable of the new bonus content is the discussion by critic Kim Newman.  Newman discusses in his commentary, The Andromeda Strain’s place in the bigger picture of the plague/virus outbreak genre, citing the movies already cited in this review, and others.  Newman’s discussion might not seem like much  on the surface, but in the bigger picture, the roughly 10-minute presentation brings new light to the fact that said genre is in fact so expansive.  The previously presented “making off” featurette, which was featured in the movie’s 2001 re-issue, is another notable addition to this re-issue.  That is because some viewers have not previously seen this featurette while others perhaps have not seen it in a long time and forgotten what was discussed in the mini-doc.  Audiences get discussions here on topics, such as the then groundbreaking special effects used in the movie, the deliberate choice of cast members who were not at the time, well-known  and the faux bibliography featured in The Andromeda Strain and its connection to it cinematic adaptation.  That discussion, with the movie’s script writer Nelson Gidding, makes for its own share of insight and entertainment.  There are also vintage interview segments with Crichton himself featured within the “making of” documentary in which he talks about his connection between his medical education and the book.  Those discussions are expanded even more in yet another of the movie’s key features, “A Portrait of Michael Crichton.”  The late, great author talks in this presentation, about his decision to author his original novels under a fake name and why he decided on going to medical school first among other topics.  As if everything in this and the other noted featurettes is not enough, the new feature-length audio commentary will entertain and engage viewers just as much if not even more than those featurettes.  All things considered here, the bonus content – new and old alike – does just as much to keep viewers engaged and entertained as the story at the center of The Andromeda Strain.  The two elements together are just part of what makes this latest re-issue of the classic sci-fi flick such a welcome addition to audiences’ home movie libraries.  The companion booklet that is featured as yet another extra with this re-issue is notable in its own right to the movie’s whole.

The companion booklet that comes with  the latest re-issue of The Andromeda Strain adds its own touch to the movie’s presentation, as its liner notes – penned by author Peter Tonguette – discuss not only the movie’s place in the grand scheme of the cinematic universe, but also that of its director, Robert Wise.  Tonguette states in his notes, that Wise and the movie both deserve far more credit than they have been given.  He notes Wise’s work on so many b-flicks prior to helming The Andromeda Strain as a big part of the reason that Wise has never gotten the credit that he believes the director has deserved.  Additionally, Tonguette discusses Wise’s approach to the Andromeda, crediting that approach for items, such as the dialogue and effect of the cinematography.  Along with Tonguette’s brief, but concise discussion on Wise’s work on The Andromeda Strain, the companion booklet also offers a starting point for discussions on the movie within the context of a film appreciation class, clearly outlining a set series of discussion topics; topics such as the nature of the deaths in Piedmont, the President’s decision whether to drop an atomic bomb on Piedmont, and the impact of the virus’ mutation.  There are also focuses on items, such as recent real life scientific breakthroughs in comparison to the topics discussed in the movie, whether The Andromeda Strain is in fact science fiction or science fact, and Werner Von Braun’s statement decades prior about the very topic on which Crichton centered his book.  Even more interesting is that all of these discussion topics were featured in a 1971 educational guide sent to schools nationwide to help promote the movie.  That guide is still just as relevant today as it was in 1971.  To that end, it is another key addition to the companion booklet included with this latest re-issue of The Andromeda Strain.  Keeping this in mind, the vast expanse of content (and the depth thereof) within the booklet proves to be just as important to the re-issue’s presentation as the bonus content and the story itself.  When all three elements are considered together, they make The Andromeda Strain a movie that, again, sci-fi fans will appreciate just as much as fans of Michael Crichton and those of the plague/virus outbreak genre.

Arrow Video’s re-issue of Universal Pictures’ The Andromeda Strain is a strong new offering for fans of Hollywood’s plague/virus outbreak genre just as much as for fans of Michael Crichton and of science fiction in general.  That is due in part to the movie’s central story.  While maybe not the first movie of its kind when it was originally released in 1971, its story is one that still rings true for audiences to this day.  It is far more believable than most other movies within its realm.  The bonus content that is featured with the movie’s recent re-issue adds even more engagement and entertainment to the re-issue’s presentation.  That is because the content balances new and old for viewers of all ages.  The companion booklet that also come with the re-issue adds even more interest to the re-issue.  Each item noted in this review is important in its own way to the whole of The Andromeda Strain.  All things considered, they make this re-issue a work that is one more of this year’s top new DVD/BD re-issues.  It is available now.  More information on this and other titles from Arrow Video is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.arrowfilms.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ArrowVideo

Twitter: http://twitter.com/ArrowFilmsVideo

 

 

 

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‘Fighting With My Family’ Deserves At Least A Fighting Chance

Courtesy: WWE Studios/Universal Pictures

Underdog stories and movies based on actual events are among the most commonplace staples in the movie industry today.  The genres reach all the way back to Hollywood’s golden age.  Back in February, World Wrestling Entertainment and its movie division WWE Studios joined the ranks of studios that have churned out movies under one banner, the other, or both when it debuted its new movie about WWE Divas Champion Paige, Fighting With My Family. The movie made its way to home release only months later in May complete with bonus content and extended director’s cut.  The bonus content featured in the movie’s home release plays its own important part to the whole of Fighting With My Family and will be addressed a little later.  The movie’s central story is its most important element and will be addressed shortly.  The work of the movie’s cast on screen also plays into its presentation and will also be addressed later.  Each item noted is important in its own way.  All things considered, Fighting With My Family proves to be a movie that has at least a fighting chance with WWE fans and wrestling fans in general.

WWE Studios/Universal Pictures’ recently released dramedy Fighting With My Family is a work that will appeal to a very targeted audience.  Keeping that in mind, it is a movie that has at least a fighting chance (yes, that pun was intended) with those viewers.  That is due in part to the story at the center of the movie.  The story is a work with an all too familiar underdog/coming-of-age base that is itself based on actual events.  It is nothing that audiences have never seen before, even within the sports realm, too.  It follows the story of WWE Divas Champion Paige as she rises through the ranks of the WWE from her humble beginnings in England.  Keeping that in mind, one could even call it another rags-to-riches piece.  Simply put, the story is nothing new in the bigger picture of the movie industry, and not overly memorable.  However, it is still an interesting piece worth at least an occasional watch both among wrestling/WWE fans and audiences in general.  Director Steven Merchant notes in his feature-length commentary that the Knight family was closely consulted for the movie, since it is based on a documentary about the family and real events.  He reveals the movie stays close to Paige’s real story, despite a few liberties being taken.  To that end, it will make the story that much more appealing for viewers.  It is just one of the aspects that makes the movie appealing to the noted viewers.  The work of the movie’s cast adds its own share of interest to the movie’s presentation.

While Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson does appear in the movie – and produced it – he is not the main star in the movie.  The cast that portrays Paige and her family are the main stars.  Nick Frost plays Paige’s dad Ricky, and is so entertaining in the role. Between his comedic moments and his more emotional moment (at the story’s finale) and even his more tough guy moments, Frost manages to keep viewers entertained with ease.  Frost’s co-star Lena Heady, who plays Paige’s mom Julia, plays so well against Frost as a foil.  The chemistry between the pair is obvious in their interactions.  It makes those interactions that much more enjoyable.  Lead star Florence Pugh is just as entertaining as her cast mates as she grows and develops as a character.  Her portrayal of Paige will keep viewers fully engaged as she goes from being that outside underdog figure at the story’s beginning to the confident, proud Divas Champion by the story’s end.  There’s no reason to hide that aspect of the story.  A story of this nature obviously ends with the underdog rising above all obstacles to win the biggest prize.  Between her acting, that of her main cast mates and even the supporting cast, the work on camera by the movie’s cast does just as much as the story itself to make the movie appealing for its key viewer base.  When the two elements are joined, they show even more why this movie doesn’t go down without a fight.  Yes, that awful pun was intended, too.  They are not the movie’s only key elements.  The bonus content that is featured with its home release is just as worth noting.

The bonus content featured with Fighting With My Family includes a feature-length audio commentary with Merchant, a “making of” featurette that features interviews with the cast, deleted scenes and a featurette on how Pugh learned the wrestling moves needed to take on the role of Paige.  The feature-length commentary is the anchor for the bonus content.  Merchant reveals through his commentary, a lot of information.  He points out that Paige’s first NXT match was actually inspired by Eminem’s movie 8 Mile, and adds later, Clint Eastwood’s 1979 movie Escape From Alcatraz played into another scene later in the movie.  That is just the tip of the iceberg.  He also reveals that Pugh’s co-star Vince Vaughan did quite a bit of improving throughout the movie in terms of lines.  The discussions on his improving will be saved for audiences to discover for themselves. Merchant also reveals through his discussions, that parts of Paige’s story were left out for the sake of time, such as the fact that Paige was accepted into WWE on her second try, not her first, and her road to the Divas Championship was far longer than time allowed, even in two-and-a-half hours (the run time of the movie’s director’s cut).  The NXT facility shown in the movie was not WWE’s real NXT facility, either, according to Merchant.  He reveals the facility was a set created in England, though many of the wrestling matches and WWE scenes were shot on set at WWE tapings.  This is just some of the information that is revealed through Merchant’s commentary.  There is far more for audiences to take in for themselves.  Between everything listed here and everything else, Merchant’s commentary proves it is the most important of this movie’s bonus features.

The cast discussions on their interactions with the real life Knight family and the focus on Pugh’s wrestling lessons are enlightening and entertaining in their own right.  They add a little bit more to Merchant’s discussions, but are overshadowed by the noted commentary.  That is not to say that they lack value, but that the commentary holds the most power in this movie’s presentation.

The deleted scenes are interesting in that it is clear why certain scenes were cut.  For instance, the extended cut of the chase between Zak and Ez definitely did not need to be in the movie for any impact.  To that end, the chase scene that is featured works well in itself.  The additional scene in which Paige’s friends confront her for changing when she comes home for the holidays is another scene that was cut.  It definitely was not needed either.  Paige’s weightlifting scene at the NXT facility did not add much to the movie, either, so it is understandable in watching that scene why it was cut, too.  These are just a few of the scenes that were cut from the final product.  When they are considered alongside the rest of the featured deleted scenes, the effect of having cut them makes for more appreciation for what is in the final product – even in the director’s cut.   Keeping all of this in mind along with the notes of the director’s commentary and the other featurettes, the bonus material featured with the home release of Fighting With My Family proves to be, in fact, important in its own right to the whole of the movie.  When it is considered along with the work of the cast on camera and the work of Merchant in fashioning the script, all three elements make the movie a piece that while it may not get its own title belt, at least doesn’t get pinned.  It is a movie that is worth at least an occasional watch that deserves a fighting chance.

WWE Studios/Universal Pictures’ recently released movie Fighting With My Family is an interesting presentation that will definitely appeal to wrestling fans in general and WWE fans alike.  It doesn’t take the championship in the already vast sea of movies from WWE Films, but it does at least deserve a fighting chance.  That is due in part to its multi-tiered story that is easily accessible due to its many all-too-familiar plot elements.  The work of the movie’s cast in front of the lens adds to its appeal, as noted already here.  The bonus content that is featured with the movie’s home release puts the finishing touch to its presentation.  Each item is important in its own right to the whole of Fighting With My Family.  All things considered, the movie doesn’t put the Smackdown on its counterparts in this year’s field of new movies, but at least never gets the three count.  More information on this and other titles from WWE Studios is available online at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.wwe.com/inside/overtheropes/wwestudios

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/OfficialWWEStudios

Twitter: http://twitter.comwweuniverse

 

 

 

More information on this and other titles from Universal Pictures is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.universalpictures.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/universalstudiosentertainment

Twitter: http://twitter.com/universalpics

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

‘The Big Bad Fox And Other Tales’ Is A Big Great Family Presentation

Courtesy: Shout! Factory/GKids

Bringing the family together just to do something like watch television and movies is something that is almost unheard of today.  It seems more and more, that television and movies have increasingly segregated families within the bounds of their own homes.  This summer though, Shout! Factory and GKids will release a new presentation that will certainly bring families back together in the form of the French import The Big Bad Wolf and Other Tales.  This roughly 80-minute presentation is due out on July 16 on Blu-ray/DVD combo pack.  While it is French in its origin, the upcoming import is dubbed in English, so American audiences won’t have to worry about reading subtitles versus watching each of the three shorts that make up the body of the presentation.  That is just one of the collection’s notable elements and will be discussed a little later.  The most notable of the presentation’s elements is its three collective shorts.  They will be discussed shortly.  The bonus content featured with the collection puts the final touch to the presentation of The Big Bad Fox and Other Tales.  It will also be discussed in this analysis of the presentation.  Each item noted here is important in its own way to the whole of The Big Bad Fox and Other Tales.  All things considered, they make the Big Bad Fox and Other Tales a collection that will entertain audiences of all ages and certainly bring the whole family together once again.

Shout! Factory and GKids’ upcoming domestic release of The Big Bad Fox and Other Tales is one of the most surprisingly enjoyable DVDs/BDs to come along so far this year in the Family DVD/BD genre.  Originally having made its debut June 21, 2017 in its home nation, its release on July 16 through Shout! Factory and GKids marks the first time the collection of shorts has seen a domestic release.  Being the collection’s domestic debut, it is a strong debut that even the most skeptical American audiences will enjoy.  That is due in part to the collection’s featured stories.  The collection is presented as a three-part play of sorts put on in a theater by a group of animals.  The first story is that of three of those animals – a pig, fox and duck – filling in for a supposedly injured stork, delivering a little baby girl to her new parents.  The physical comedy that is incorporated into the story harkens back to the old slapstick of the Looney Tunes cartoons and other similar animated shorts franchises.  That comedy ticks along at a stable pace along with the story, with the pairing ensuring lots of entertainment along with engagement.

The second story finds a not so big bad fox trying to steal chickens from a farm, but ends up becoming a surrogate “mother” to a trio of young chicks after he steals the eggs from their mother hen.  In the process, the fox has to deal with a far less nice wolf (who is introduced through a playing of the wolf’s introduction from ‘Peter and the Wolf’) and eventually learns a very valuable lesson about accepting himself for who and what he is.  That revelation leads to a heartwarming finale that will not be given away here.  It can be said that the finale will certainly leave a smile on the face of even the most hardened viewer.

The final act of the “play” is a holiday story that finds the trio from the first story joining together to save Christmas after one of the group accidentally knocks down a plastic Santa.  Thinking he has killed what the Brits call “Father Christmas” (Santa here in the U.S.), the animal sets off with his friends to play Santa and deliver their own presents to the children of the world.  The story’s finale will leave viewers of every age smiling and laughing just as much as the other stories featured in this collection.

Even after the collection ends, there is still something interesting to note.  Audiences who sit through the credits will find that a very well-known movie studio *coughs* Disney played a part in this collection, albeit a minor role.  There is also a rather delectable recipe for crepes featured at the finale of the credits.  The whole thing ends with a frog janitor putting on his own brief dance number for one last laugh before he walks off stage and turns off the theater’s lights.

The stories that make up the body of The Big Bad Fox and Other Tales offer more than enough entertainment for the whole family from the beginning of the roughly 80-minute presentation to its end.  While the content itself forms a solid foundation for the program’s presentation, it is just one part of what makes the collection so enjoyable.  As previously noted, The Big Bad Fox and Other Tales is French in origin.  Its forthcoming domestic release however, is dubbed in English thanks to a group of British voice actors.  This seems minor on the surface, but the reality of the situation is that it is key in its own way to the program’s enjoyment.  Being dubbed in English means that American audiences can enjoy the program in whole instead of having to divide their attention between the action on screen and nonstop English subtitles.  That full engagement means a full enjoyment by audiences of all ages, and in turn full appreciation for the collection.  On another note, a close watch of the collection reveals something interesting of the dub work done for the program’s domestic release.  The voice work actually lines up quite surprisingly well with the animals’ mouths.  There are so many foreign imports that come to the U.S. every year whose overdubs simply do not work because the actors’ mouths do not line up with what the English actors are saying.  It takes away from viewers’ ability to suspend their disbelief.  In the case of this presentation though, the dubs and on-screen motions line up quite well, which adds even more to the enjoyment, because it eliminates that focus from viewers’ minds, instead allowing viewers to focus that much more fully on the action onscreen.  It is one more way in which the dubbing proves crucial to the overall enjoyment of The Big Bad Fox and Other Tales.  When this is considered along with the stories already discussed here, the two elements together go a long way toward making the program in whole that much more enjoyable for audiences.  They are not the only key elements to discuss in analyzing this forthcoming animated import.  The bonus content featured with the program rounds out its most important elements.

The bonus content featured with The Big Bad Fox and Other Tales is just as engaging as the program’s primary content.  Audiences learn through the director interviews that director Benjamin Renner based the program’s title story on his own personal life.  He explains in his story, he felt like an outcast growing up, that he wasn’t what he was expected to be by so many, and that translated into The Big Bad Fox.  His discussion on this topic is quite moving and enlightening.  Renner additionally notes that the program’s first story, involving the trio bringing the baby to her new parents was also inspired from his own life.  He expands even more in the live Q&A session featured as another bonus, he went to animation because he wanted to tell stories, but could not write.  That in itself is an intriguing revelation.  This critic’s own view is that it is a good thing that Renner pointed his focus to animation, as the storytelling through this collection’s shorts are endearing and entertaining.

The director interviews and brief Q&A sessions are just two of the bonuses featured with The Big Bad Fox and Other Tales.  Also featured as an extra is a not so standard “making of” featurette that finds a trio of French youths interviewing Renner, his co-director Patrick Imbert and the rest of the program’s creative heads.  The children’s questions and actions put on full display, the innocence of children, and will make children and adults alike smile and laugh.  As one of the heads talks professionally about how things work in one discussion, the kids start losing attention very quickly.  Parents will laugh at this just as much as kids because of their ability to relate to the situation.  The discussions on why digital animation was used in place of hand drawn animation are enlightening for older audiences, and are just as sure to generate discussion among said viewers.  This viewer is still more a fan of hand drawn animation versus CG, though the work put into this program’s look did admittedly pay off, as it does stand apart from so many other CG animated features.  To that end, there is that to the presentation’s credit, too.  There is so much more that one could discuss other than what is noted here, but that would take entirely too much time.  When everything else featured in the “making of” featurette is considered with everything already noted here and everything noted (and not) in the director interviews, the end result is an experience that is just as entertaining and engaging as the program’s primary content.  When that content is coupled with all of this secondary content, the whole of everything makes The Big Bad Fox and Other Tales a big great family feature.

Studio Canal’s upcoming import of The Big Bad Fox and  Other Tales – which is scheduled for release July 16 through Shout! Factory and GKids – is a surprisingly entertaining overseas offering that American families across the board will and can enjoy together.  That is due in part to the entertaining and heartwarming stories that make up the body of the program.  The stories’ comedic elements harken back to the comedic stylings of Warner Brothers’ Looney Tunes shorts while the stories themselves will touch viewers of all ages.  The fact that the stories are told with English dubs that line up surprisingly well with the mouth motions of the characters adds even more to the program’s enjoyment.  The bonus content featured with the program puts the final touch to the whole of the presentation with its extra information.  Each item noted is important in its own way to the whole of The Big Bad Fox and Other Tales.  All things considered, they make this presentation a big great presentation for the whole family.  It is scheduled for release July 16 on BD/DVD combo pack through Shout! Factory and GKids.  More information on this and other titles from Shout! Factory is available online now at:

 

 

Website: http://www.shoutfactory.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/shoutfactoryofficial

Twitter: http://twitter.com/ShoutFactory

 

 

 

More information on this and other titles from GKids is available online at:

 

 

 

Website: http://gkids.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/GKIDSfilms

Twitter: http://twitter.com/GKIDSfilms

 

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‘Bridges To Bremen’ Will Certainly “Connect With” Every Rolling Stones Fan

Courtesy: Eagle Rock Entertainment

The Rolling Stones have been in the news quite a bit lately thanks to band front man Mick Jagger’s recent health scare.  Jagger didn’t take long to recover from that scare, though, allowing the band to head back out on the road for its No Filter Tour.  While the band’s tour spans the globe, there obviously are those areas and fans who will not get the chance to catch the band in its latest outing.  For those audiences (and even for those who will get to see the band), Eagle Rock Entertainment has pulled another of the band’s archived shows from the vaults and released it for the masses in the form of Bridges to Bremen.  Released just last week, this latest addition to Eagle Rock Entertainment’s ongoing series of live Rolling Stones shows.  The concert presented in the recording was originally captured Aug. 26, 1998 in Berlin, Germany.  The concert was part of the band’s yearlong Bridges To Babylon Tour, which was in support of the band’s then new album Bridges To Babylon.  This latest addition to The Rolling Stones’ live recordings collection from Eagle Rock Entertainment is just as enjoyable for all as each of the previous recordings that Eagle Rock Entertainment has released.  That is due in part to the recording’s set list, which will be discussed shortly.  The band’s performance of said set list plays just as much a part in the concert’s enjoyment as the set list itself and will be discussed a little later.  The companion booklet featured with the recording rounds out the recording’s most important elements.  Each item noted here is important in its own way to the whole of Bridges to Bremen.  All things considered, they make Bridges to Bremen a recording that will connect with The Rolling Stones’ fans everywhere.

Eagle Rock Entertainment’s latest addition to its ongoing series of live Rolling Stones recordings is a presentation that will connect with fans of the veteran performers around the globe.  Yes, that awful pun was intended.  The recording’s appeal is due in part to its set list.  The 22-song set list (26 counting the four bonus songs from the band’s tour-opening shows at Chicago’s Soldier Field) gives presents a relatively wide cross section of the band’s catalog up to that point.  The set list reaches all the way back to the band’s 1966 album Aftermath and as far forward as Bridges To Babylon, with that album getting the most nods, at five songs.  Audiences also get plenty of familiar hits, such as ‘Paint It Black,’ ‘Sympathy For The Devil’ and ‘Honky Tonk Women’ and some lesser performed songs, such as ‘Memory Motel,’ ‘Out Of Control’ and ‘Out Of Control’ just to name a few songs.  Those lesser performed, deep cuts are addressed in the recording’s liner notes, which will be addressed later.  The set list is presented in the same chronological order on the recording’s two CDs as on its SD Blu-ray, so audiences get the same full show on both platforms.  What’s more, the set list’s sequence shows the band members’ attention to the impact of each song’s energy, as the energies of each song are balanced expertly from beginning to end.  The band knew where to keep the energy high, where to pull it back and where to push it right back up again throughout.  Simply put, the set list featured in this recording offers audiences plenty to appreciate in itself.  The foundation that it forms is strong, and is strengthened even more by the band’s performance thereof.

The band’s performance of the concert’s set list includes not just that of the band’s main four members – Mick Jagger, Ronnie Wood, Keith Richards and Charlie Watts – but the performance of the group’s fellow performers, too.  When singer Lisa Fischer hits the high notes in ‘Gimme Shelter,’ her control of her instrument displays clearly, her talents just as clearly as her performances in past Rolling Stones live recordings.  The band’s late great saxophonist Bobby Keys is just as impressive both as a supporting musician and as he gets the spotlight in ‘Miss You.’  Mick, meanwhile, handles his role as front man with the same impressive swagger as always during the group’s performance of ‘Out Of Control.’  His connection with the audience as the song ends and the audience continues singing reminds audiences why he is among the upper echelons of the industry’s top performers.  The audience keeps singing, and he so nonchalantly encourages the crowd’s enthusiasm, in turn increasing the audience’s energy.  The very fact that he so casually looks at the stage’s video screen to find which songs the fans want to hear just before the band performs ‘Memory Motel’ adds even more to that positive image.  As Keith Richards brings up Ronnie Woods’ daughter at the end of ‘Thief in The Night,’ even he shows his own charm, adding even more to the show’s interest and enjoyment.  It’s another display of the band members’ humility in that willingness to put the spotlight on the rest of the group instead of themselves.  It’s just one more way – and hardly the last – in which the band’s performance makes this recording so enjoyable.  The rest of the recording offers just as many examples of why the group’s performance is so important to the whole of Bridges to Bremen.  While it clearly adds even more to the recording’s presentation, it still is not the last of the recording’s most important elements.  The companion booklet that is featured with the recording rounds out the recording’s most important elements.

The companion booklet that comes with Bridges to Bremen is important to note because, as with the booklets included with the band’s previous live recordings, it paints a vivid picture of the concert featured within the recording.  This time, that picture is painted by writer-broadcaster Paul Sexton, who has contributed to Billboard, Music Week and broadcasts on BBC Radio 2.  Sexton’s ruminations are an important addition to the recording because of the revelations that he makes.  He reveals in his notes, that Jagger admitted to him at one point, he was concerned about the ability of the pneumatic bridge to connect from the main stage to the secondary stage even though it allowed the band to get out with the crowd without making the band get into the crowd.  Of course it worked perfectly on the night in question in this concert.  Sexton also notes in his writings, the connection of the band in whole throughout the course of the show, the ability of the band’s fans to play a role in the concert’s set list (Mick even references the fans’ choices on stage early on in the show), the fact that the concert shown here was originally broadcast across Europe at the time and the placement of the concert in the bigger picture of the tour’s schedule.  He notes the concert was one of the band’s last in the yearlong tour.  This is important to note because as deep as the band was into its run by that point, none of the band’s members showed any wear and tear.  Every performer was at the top of his and her game.  Between these notations and plenty of others featured in the recording’s companion booklet, Sexton’s notes add their own share of engagement and entertainment to the overall presentation of Bridges To Bremen.  When all of that is considered with the band’s performance and the recording’s overall set list (bonus content included), the whole of this recording becomes yet another welcome addition to the home library of any Rolling Stones fan.

The Rolling Stones’ latest live recording Bridges To Bremen is another offering from the veteran rock band that the band’s fans around the globe will find another welcome addition to their collections of the band’s records.  That is due, as noted here, in part to the recording’s set list, which presents a relatively wide cross section of the band’s catalog at the time, reaching back in time to the band’s early days and up to its then most recent record.  The band’s performance of the set list (including the performance of the touring musicians) ensures even more, audiences’ engagement and entertainment.  The liner notes featured in the recording’s companion booklet adds even more to that engagement and entertainment.  Each noted item is important in its own way to the whole of BTB.  All things considered, they make the recording a presentation that is sure to connect with Rolling Stones fans everywhere.  Bridges to Bremen is available now.  More information on the recording is available online now along with all of The Rolling Stones’ latest news and more at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.rollingstones.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/therollingstones

Twitter: http://twitter.com/RollingStones

 

 

 

More information on this and other titles from Eagle Rock Entertainment is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.eagle-rock.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/EagleRockEnt

Twitter: http://twitter.com/EagleRockNews

 

 

 

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King’s Classic Montreux Show Will Appeal To Her Most Devoted Fans

Courtesy: Eagle Rock Entertainment

Carole King has seemingly done it all over the course of her career.  She has released 17 studio albums, released countless hit songs, earned just as many awards and nominations for her music and even been honored with a Broadway music.  She will also serve as one of the featured performers for this year’s Independence Day celebration on PBS.  That’s a heck of a resume (of sorts), and is surely just the tip of the proverbial iceberg. Early this month, Eagle Rock Entertainment released a new archived performance from King from 1973.  The performance, recorded at the famed Montreux Jazz Festival, is a presentation that is sure to appeal to King’s most devoted fan base.  That is due in part to its set list, which will be discussed shortly.  King’s performance of said set list plays into that appeal, too.  It will be discussed a little later.  The recording’s liner notes put the final touch to its presentation and will also be discussed later.  Each item noted here is important in its own way to the whole of Carole King: Live at Montreux 1973.  All things considered, they make this recording a piece that King’s fans will agree shows why she is “King” in name, but royalty in the bigger picture of the music industry.

Eagle Rock Entertainment’s new Carole King live recording Live at Montreux 1973 is a presentation that will appeal easily to King’s most devoted fan base.  That is due in no small part to the recording’s set list.  The 15-song set focuses largely on King’s 1973 album Fantasy and her 1971 record TapestryWriter (1970) is represented here with a performance of ‘Up On The Roof,’ but otherwise, the set list is composed of songs from the noted albums.  Fantasy gets the bigger portion of the show, with 10 of the album’s 13 songs featured in the set in the near same sequence as they are presented in the album’s presentation.  The only songs featured in Fantasy that are not featured in this performance are ‘Directions,’ ‘Weekdays’ and ‘Welfare Symphony.’  Again, save for those songs, the rest of Fantasy is featured here in its exact order from the album.  In regards to Tapestry, that record gets seven nods.  The album features 12 songs, to put that previous number into perspective.  In other words, while it may not be featured in whole itself, it certainly receives a healthy representation, too.  The songs are not presented in the same sequence from the album, but King’s most devoted fans will obviously overlook that, considering again just how many of the album’s songs are here.  It is not known why King’s 1971 album Music and its 1972 follow-up Rhymes and Reasons are not featured as part of the set list, considering that the performance featured in this recording came only a month after the original release of Fantasy – this little factoid is one of the interesting notes featured in veteran journalist Jim Farber’s liner notes, and will be discussed later – but that aside, the set list that is presented is such that it will still appeal to audiences even without those albums’ representation.  Keeping all of this in mind, the set list at the center of Live at Montreux 1973 forms a strong foundation for the recording.  That foundation is strengthened even more by King’s performance and that of her band mates who eventually join her on stage.

King’s performance of the show’s set list (and that of her band mates (al clad in St. Louis Blues hockey jerseys – that should add even more appeal to a certain cross section of King’s fan base, considering history was made by the Blues this year) strengthens the recording’s foundation even more because of the group’s ability to pull audiences into the experience.  It is difficult to fully put into words just what it is about the group’s performance, but audiences are pulled into the show through the group’s performance.  Maybe it is the subtlety in King’s own performance.  Maybe it is the subtlety of her band mates’ performances, which build on her own work, or maybe it is all of the above.  Even in the concert’s more energetic numbers, there is a certain control among King and company that creates its own power, and in turn pulls audiences in that much more.  It’s like watching a good movie or reading a really good book.  The collective performances present such expert talent that audiences will have no problem escaping into the performance.  Audiences will know, obviously, they are not there as they watch, but at the same time, the performances make it so easy to get wrapped up in the performance.  That is a tribute to the work of all involved.  When this is considered along with the concert’s set list in general, the two elements together make Live at Montreux 1973 that much more appealing for King’s most devoted fan base.  They are not the only elements of this recording that the noted audiences will appreciate.  The recording’s bonus liner notes put the finishing touch to this recording’s presentation.

The inclusion of bonus liner notes is nothing new for Eagle Rock Entertainment’s live recordings.  The liner notes always add so much to the recordings’ presentations, too.  This recording is no exception to that rule.  As previously noted, veteran journalist Jim Farber – who has worked for outlets, such as Time magazine, The New York Times and Mojo magazine – crafted the liner notes for this recording.  Farber offers plenty of information to add to the experience through his liner notes.  He reveals in his notes that the performance featured here was recorded only one month after King released Fantasy, adding prior to the performance here, the songs featured on that record had not been tested in a live setting.  That is important to note because considering this would have been the first official live outing for Fantasy, it received quite the positive reaction from audiences at the time.  To that end, it makes the recording a certain historical documentation of sorts.  He further states the performance here was a stark contrast to the 10,000 people before whom King had performed only six weeks prior in New York.  Additionally, he notes that the performance featured here marked king’s first-ever international outing.  King jokes nervously with her audience late in the show how little French she knows (for those who might not know, Montreux’s location makes French one of four prominent languages spoken in that region of Sweden.  The other prominent languages spoken in Montreux are German, Italian and Romansh.), leading to some playful laughs from the audience along with King. King even makes light of that herself in the hour-long performance.  As if everything noted here is not enough for audience, Farber also makes note of King’s role in the advent of the Smooth Jazz movement through certain songs that are featured here.  Audiences can read about those songs for themselves.  Between the revelations discussed here and plenty of others that Farber makes in his liner notes, the notes in whole join with the performance to strengthen the presentation of Live at Montreux 1973 even more.  It gives King’s most devoted fan base that much more reason still to add this recording to their own music libraries.  All things considered, the recording in whole leaves audiences agreeing that King is royalty not just in name, but in the bigger picture of the music industry.

Eagle Rock Entertainment’s recently released Carole King live recording Live at Montreux 1973 is a presentation that King’s most devoted fan base will find appealing with each watch.  That is due, as discussed here, in part to the shows’ set list, which presents King at an early stage of her career; not its infancy, but still very early on.  The performance of King and her fellow musicians will certainly pull audiences into the concert, adding to the experience for the noted audiences even more.  The recording’s bonus liner notes, crafted by veteran journalist Jim Farber puts the finishing touch to the recording’s whole.  Each item noted here is important in its own way to the whole of Live at Montreux 1973.  All things considered, they  make Live at Montruex 1973 a virtual time capsule of Carole King’s career that her most devoted fans will assuredly appreciate.  It is available now.  More information on Live at Montreux 1973 is available online now along with all of Carole King’s latest news and more at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.caroleking.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CaroleKing

Twitter: http://twitter.com/carole_king

 

 

 

More information on this and other titles from Eagle Rock Entertainment is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://www.eagle-rock.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/EagleRockEnt

Twitter: http://twitter.com/EagleRockNews

 

 

 

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‘The Illusionist’ Maintains Its Cinematic Magic In Its New Latest Re-Issue

Courtesy: 20th Century Fox/MVD Entertainment Group/MVD Visual

MVD Entertainment Group has added 20th Century Fox’s period drama The Illusionist to its MVD Marquee collection.  The company is scheduled to re-issue the movie, which stars Paul Giamatti (Sideways, Cinderella Man, 12 Years A Slave), Edward Norton (The Incredible Hulk, American History X, Birdman) and Jessica Biel (I Now Pronounce You Chuck & Larry, 7th Heaven, I’ll Be Home For Christmas) in its lead roles, on June 25.  The movie itself is one of the most underappreciated movies of the 1990s, and the upcoming re-issue serves to remind audiences of exactly that.  That is due in part to the movie’s story, which will be addressed shortly.  Its bonus content,  which will be addressed a little later, adds even more interest to the re-issue’s presentation.  The collective work of the movie’s cast and crew also adds to the story and will be addressed later.  When it is coupled with the movie’s story, all of the elements together show why this latest presentation of The Illusionist is more cinematic magic.

MVD Entertainment Group’s forthcoming re-issue of 20th Century Fox’s period drama The Illusionist is a positive offering for most audiences.  That is due in part to the movie’s story.  The story — based on a short story crafted by author Steven Millhauser — is a fully-engaging and entertaining presentation that is full of magic, murder, mystery and romance.  Those elements are all expertly balanced throughout the course of the story, too.  It is set in 19th Century Vienna, Austria (but was actually filmed in The Czech Republic – this will be discussed later) and features Norton and Giamatti as Eisenheim and Inspector Uhl respectively.  Eisenheim, who was friends with the Duchess Sophie van Techen (Biel) when the pair was much younger, wants to reconnect with the Duchess.  The problem for Eisenheim is that Uhl, who is working for Crown Prince Leopold (Refus Sewell – A Knight’s Tale, Dark City, Tristan + Isolde), stands in his way.  Eisenheim and Uhl eventually develop a certain almost friendship as the story progresses while tensions between Eisenheim and Leopold increase right up to the story’s climactic conclusion.  The story’s run time is listed at 109 minutes (1 hour, 49 minutes), but because of the pacing, feels longer than that noted time.  What’s truly interesting is that usually when pacing makes a move feel longer than it is, that is a bad thing.  In the case of this story though, it is the exact opposite.  Somehow, writer/director Neil Burger, who adapted Millhauser’s short story to the screen, managed to make the story work even despite that feel.  That is a tribute to his work.  Even with the pacing seeming slow at times, the story is still able to keep viewers engaged and entertained with ease.  The movie’s twist ending gives viewers a finale that is completely fulfilling.  That fulfillment finale, and the ability of the movie’s story to keep viewers engaged and entertained creates a strong foundation for The Illusionist and gives viewers more than enough reason to watch this movie.  As much as the movie’s story does for its presentation, its bonus content adds even more to the movie’s presentation.

The bonus content featured in MVD Entertainment Group’s forthcoming re-issue of The Illusionist is carried directly over from the movie’s most recent release, its 2007 release.  That includes not just the brief making of featurette and equally brief conversation with Biel, but also the feature-length audio commentary from writer/director Neil Burger.  The commentary is listed, in this re-issue, as an audio option instead of a bonus extra, unlike the 2007 home release, as an added note, but it is still the most important of the movie’s extras.  Burger  presents a lot of information in his commentary, such as the revelation that most of the movie was recorded on site in Prague, Czech Republic and that his adaptation of the original short story The Illusionist is quite different from its literary source material.  Considering the number of differences that he addresses, it makes one want to find said story and see just how different the two stories are.  That is just some of the content revealed through Burger’s commentary. He also reveals that Norton and Biel were not the first choices for their respective roles.  Those discussions are themselves certain to generate plenty of discussion, and in turn are more proof of why Burger’s commentary should have been featured in The Illusionist’s latest re-issue.  They are certainly just the tip of the proverbial iceberg that is his commentary.  As the movie progresses, he shares far more that audiences can discover for themselves.  Keeping that in mind, Burger’s bonus commentary builds on the foundation formed by the movie’s story and strengthens it that much more.  It is still not the last of the movie’s positives.  The collective work of the movie’s cast and crew couples with the story and commentary to give audiences even more to appreciate.

The work of all four of the movie’s lead cast members is worthy of applause in its own way throughout the movie.  Burger notes in the movie’s audio commentary (along with so much more already noted) that he made Eisenheim more of a sympathetic character by using Inspector Uhl more than he was in the movie’s source material.  The thing is that Norton’s abilities as an actor did not even call for more inclusion of Uhl.  Given, Norton and Giamatii were just enjoyable on-screen together as they were on their own, but Norton’s own abilities were more than enough to make his work engaging and entertaining in its own right.  His emoting during his time on stage in front of Eisenheim’s audiences is just one example of that talent.  His tears were just as believable as he reaches out for Sophie’s hand in the final act when he is on stage.  The pain that he displays translates so well, even if it is all part of his act to trick everyone.  Much the same can be said of Giamatti that is said of Norton.  When Giamatti is set alongside Sewell, he [Giamatti] shines even more while Sewell, as more of a supporting character, makes it just as easy for audiences to dislike Leopold.  Burger discusses this, too, in the commentary. Viewers will agree with his comments here, too.  What’s more, viewers will also appreciate the discussions by Burger on the amount of research that was done to make The Illusionist look just like 19th Century Vienna in terms of costumes and even buildings.  That research clearly paid off, as the resultant work of the movie’s costume and set designers created an environment that was just as believable as the work of the movie’s cast, getting back on track.  It is even noted by Burger, that Eddie Marsan (who played Eisenheim’s manager) was in his 30s when the movie was crafted, yet he looked like he was in his 50s.  That is another tribute to the work of the movie’s crew.  If one did not know what Burger revealed in the commentary, one would in fact think Marsan was in his 50s.  Getting back on the matter of the cast and crew’s work, it couples with Burger’s work on the movie’s script and his commentary, to make the movie appealing for everyone.

MVD Entertainment Group’s upcoming Blu-ray re-issue of 20th Century Fox’s The Illusionist is a work that will entertain any true movie buff.  That is due, as noted, in part to the movie’s story.  The story expertly balances elements of magic, murder, mystery and romance to make a whole that will keep viewers engaged from beginning to end.  That is due in part to the movie’s story, adapted by writer/director Neil Burger to the screen and to the commentary provided throughout the movie as a bonus commentary.  The work of the movie’s cast and crew adds to its enjoyment, too.  Each item is important in its own way to the whole of The Illusionist.  All things considered, they show why The Illusionist is its own magical cinematic diamond in the rough.  More information on this and other titles from MVD Entertainment Group is available online now at:

 

 

 

Website: http://mvdvisual.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/MVDEntertainmentGroup

Twitter: http://twitter.com/mvdentgroup

 

 

 

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and “Like” it.  Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil’s Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.